Kia pai te rā!

RNZ continuing to promote te Reo Māori

“There’s a familiar word there – ‘pai’ – which means ‘good'”, says Hēmi.

“‘Ra’ is ‘day’ – so we’re telling someone to have a good day: ‘kia pai te rā.”

It’s a sentence that can be used at any time of day – and a dextrous one too.

“What we can do is take out that word ‘rā’ and we can put in another word.”

“If we want to say have a good meeting – ‘kia pai te hui'”.

“Have a good trip – ‘kia pai te haere’. So we can change that last word for different contexts.”

“You’ll normally hear it when you’re saying goodbye to someone, or maybe when you’re signing off an email, if it’s not too late in the day.”

“You can also change ‘ra’ for ‘po’, which is ‘night.'”

The two ‘t’ sounds in te Reo Māori

Hēmi also takes us through the two different sounds of the letter “t” in te reo Māori.”

“There’s the dull ‘t’ sound, in words like ‘ta’, ‘te’ and ‘to'”.

“Some day it’s almost similar to a ‘d’ sound.”

“Then there’s the sharper ‘t’ sound, like in ‘ti’ and ‘tu'”.

“You can hear the – almost ‘s’ sound. Tsi, tsu.”

Audio for pronunciation is included at Māori Phrase a Day : Kia pai te rā

There may be moans about this but I don’t see any harm in it, and some will appreciate it.

Leave a comment

2 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  17th January 2020

    What National Socialist Radio espouses doesn’t worry me. I don’t listen. That’s a pity because they have some decent interviews without the curse of ad breaks talkback radio requires to remain viable.

    The problem is One News. They now have the anchor sign off in Maori after talking to a correspondent. This pidgin-like approach gets up my nose. Either have the news in Maori or English. What’s so hard about that?

    Kia pai te rā ,Pete. ✔

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  17th January 2020

      Why do you call National Radio Nazi Radio ? That’s what National Socialist means; Nazi is the abbreviation.

      We don’t call newsreaders ‘anchors’ in NZ, that’s their American name.

      Reply

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