Open Forum – 16 February

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121 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  16th February 2020

    NZ Initiative(Business Roundtable)does not take kindly to a Reserve Bank Governor that puts NZ citizens needs above their own….

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/opinion-analysis/119530605/a-year-of-anger-between-reserve-bank-governor-adrian-orr-and-nz-initiatives-roger-partridge

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  16th February 2020

      Blazer shilling for a banker! Too funny.

      Orr’s latest performance analysed:
      https://croakingcassandra.com/2020/02/13/an-unimpressive-mpc/

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  16th February 2020

        Croaker is never happy …nothing at the Reserve Bank/Treasury is ‘rigourous’ enough since he left.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  16th February 2020

          Many agree with his critiques which are usually very well founded and factually sourced.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  16th February 2020

            they are nothing of the sort…they are just the bankers usual veiled threats when the tame RB Governors they are used to dealing with are…replaced by someone with some …balls.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  16th February 2020

              Complete crap, B. He’s an economist not a banker. And anyone can make their own judgement from reading his writings compared with your nonsense.

    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  16th February 2020

      Bad news, Lurch, is most Americans feel better off under Trump.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  16th February 2020

        So , where is the sky high approval ratings then, the economy is good, they feel better …..yada yada yada…the numbers arent good enough to get him re-elected.
        Is it his personality do you think ?

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  16th February 2020

          Here, just where they were last time he was elected:
          Phttps://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/other/president_trump_job_approval-6179.html

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  16th February 2020

            So average 45% approval is good ?
            I would be worried if I won the presidency by 75,000 votes in 3 states and since then democrats have pushed voting turnout to highest level in a century ..

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  16th February 2020

              I don’t think it’s a slam dunk either way but a pretty good chance Lurch’s nemesis will finish nose in front again.

            • I think you are probably right on that 2020 electoral outcome Alan.

              Because the American voting system is so heavily rigged in favour of the Republicans, the Democrat presidential candidate could win a 6% majority of the popular vote and still lose out in the electoral college vote.

              “Historically red states like Texas and Arizona are trending toward Democrats, but most likely not enough to flip those states in the next election. If Democrats narrow Trump’s margins in those states, while Trump barely holds onto states like Florida or Wisconsin, the next Democratic candidate could win the popular vote by 5 million votes or more — and still lose.”

              https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/9/17/20868790/republicans-lose-popular-vote-win-electoral-college

              https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/1/30/20997046/constitution-electoral-college-senate-popular-vote-trump

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  17th February 2020

              To state the obvious, the result will depend on the turnout in the places that matter, not in those that don’t. The Democrats are at a disadvantage in that their candidate selection is dividing and polarising their own supporters risking demotivating those who support the losing candidates.

            • To restate the even more obvious, the next Democratic candidate could win the popular vote by 5 million votes or more — and still lose, because the American voting system is so heavily rigged in favour of the Republicans.

              In 2016, Clinton received 1 electoral college vote for every 290,000 popular votes. Trump received 1 electoral college vote for every 206,000 popular votes. That’s how rigged the system is.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  17th February 2020

              The system is designed to prevent the interests of a few big states like California and New York steamrolling those of many small states. Trump won and will likely win again by precisely advocating for the interests of those small states. How is this wrong?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  17th February 2020

              And before you answer that, think about whether or not the UN should operate under the same principles.

    • Corky

       /  16th February 2020

      Also raise your hand if you did shite!

      Reply
  2. lurcher1948

     /  16th February 2020

    Trump’s golf trips are costing the USA citizens megabucks
    https://trumpgolfcount.com/
    tRump supports don’t want this known as he’s a cheating ball kicker.and a man who bankrupted a casino and a lot of other companies

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  16th February 2020

      Those undocumented migrants who Trump now complains about but was happy to employ to clean his golf resorts confirms the Secret Service is charged the full going rate, not the nominal charge that some Trum family members talked about
      Trump charging Secret Service premium rates at his hotels: $650 for rooms, $2,000 for golf carts
      https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2020/2/7/1917402/-Trump-charging-Secret-Service-premium-rates-at-his-hotels-650-for-rooms-2000-for-golf-carts

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  16th February 2020

      USA citizens don’t care about small beer around golf trips. They don’t care about his tax situation. (There are enough in-depth articles after investigations about that.) They don’t care about his relationships with bankruptcy and shady things which litter his history.

      They want what they see as a benevolent dictator. And they will listen to the person who fits that bill ahead of any so called experts, ‘independent analysts,’ or mere ‘commentators.’

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  16th February 2020

        They don’t all feel like that, or the figures would not show that fewer are in favour of him than aren’t.

        $128,000,000 for golf isn’t small beer, that works out to roughly $128,000 for evey day that he’s been in office and he plays golf one day in four.

        The idea that the money paid by the taxpayer for the hotel nights and golf cart rentals goes to him is abhorrent.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  16th February 2020

          It is not fair to pick on Shipley about that dinner. As Judith Collins showed, it’s easy to get confused about dinners and casual cups of tea. They both had more important things on their minds so little slips of recall are understandable.

          Reply
      • Duker

         /  16th February 2020

        US Citizens dont care ?

        It was Candidate Trump who raised a hue and cries about Obamas golfing trips
        “The Trump Twitter Archive shows the Republican whining about his predecessor’s golfing over and over and over and over and over again.
        So US citizens arent concerned but one Trump was ?
        eg

        “At an event in New Hampshire in Feb. 2016, while again complaining about Obama golfing, Trump declared that if he were in office, “I’d want to stay in the White House and work my ass off.” It’s a vow he repeated several times.
        https://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/spotlight-returns-trump-s-intense-interest-playing-golf-n1121061

        Clearly the US voters would be worried that Trump isnt working his ass off in the Whitehouse like he said he would.
        Hint dont dig the hole deeper for yourself as I have a bigger spade to bury you

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  16th February 2020

          I would bet that Obama didn’t own the equipment or hotels that he charged to the taxpayer, either. $128,000,000 won’t be 100% profit for Trump, or anything like it, but even if he only cleared 10%, that’s $12,800,000 handed to him by the government, i.e. the taxpayers. Nice work if you can get it. Pay yourself millions to play golf.

          I wonder what other perks he’s giving himself. Isn’t he charging for VIPs to stay at his hotel ? I seem to remember something about that.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  16th February 2020

            I wasn’t too far out with my one day in four; he’s been on the golfcourse 22% of the days he’s been president.

            No wonder with the revenue he’s gaining from it. .

            Reply
            • duperez

               /  16th February 2020

              Given what happens now when Ardern isn’t in Parliament imagine the reaction if on 22% of days she were on the golf course!

          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  17th February 2020

            Be thankful he is such a conscientious tweeter than barely a day passes without his provoking righteous rage from the MSM, even when he has is golfing. Such dedication to his job.

            Reply
  3. Duker

     /  16th February 2020

    Blast from the past …the late 1990s Tourism scandal with added juice about a then brash young Aussie hired to tell Kiwis how to run things -ScoMo
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/119419731/tourism-wars-1m-payouts-and-an-arrogant-future-australian-pm-at-the-centre-of-a-very-kiwi-scandal
    That complete disaster as a Minister McCully was at the centre of it…preceeding his later muck ups over Nuie Toursim, and the Saudi Sheep deal where facilitation payments or bribes were handed over.
    What caught my eye was this
    “Shipley faced questioning in Parliament over her relationship with Roberts, and in particular a dinner they’d had together in August 1998.
    Shipley at first denied the dinner had taken place, then said the dinner did happen but tourism was not discussed, and finally admitted tourism was discussed but not Saatchi’s contract.
    Then a letter from Roberts to the Tourism Board surfaced, dated shortly after the August dinner, in which he confirmed the contract had been discussed.
    An orchestrated litany of Lies by the then PM..

    Then the last laugh … she made a speech “on the steps of parliament” saying she hant misled anyone. Convention of the day , and now, meant she couldnt tell porkies inside the house.
    The media should have ripped her head off over this Trumpian level of lying

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  16th February 2020

      How do you know that HE wasn’t lying ?

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  16th February 2020

        Why did she lie about the dinner even occurring and the succession of lies
        Of course it was Shipley as Roberts was a master of the backroom deal.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  16th February 2020

          I prefer not to assume that someone’s lying unless I have evidence.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  16th February 2020

            Evidence ?
            “Shipley at first denied the dinner had taken place, then said the dinner did happen but tourism was not discussed, and finally admitted tourism was discussed but not Saatchi’s contract. and then the letter came out… ” he confirmed the contract had been discussed.”
            Like I said the letter was probably in Labours hands all a long and Shipley lied 3 or 4 times unless you are saying she refreshed her memory 3 or 4 times
            Then the recent Construction Mainzeal firm collapse court case her evidence was :
            “”I consider the board of Mainzeal was diligent and careful, in the circumstances we faced at the time. We kept the interests of Mainzeal’s creditors, employees and customers firmly in mind at all times and endeavoured to protect their interests and avoid loss.”
            Cant have been much truth in that as as she had to pay $6 mill in damages, along side other directors.
            In really she was a bunny as far as construction industry practices and was used as a trophy director by the principal owner.

            Reply
          • Blazer

             /  16th February 2020

            how do you think we got to…’Shipley’s ..believe it or…not’!

            Reply
  4. Corky

     /  16th February 2020

    Simon is promising tax cuts. What? Giving people their own money back?. Dat’s not how a gummint should operate.

    So the equation is:

    Tax cuts v benefit increases =?

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  16th February 2020

      What about spending more than labour on infrastructure and tax cuts and ‘no tax increases’ ( conditions apply) and taxes will be indexed (conditions apply)…….

      Sounds like GST is going to be increased again so that tax cuts and indexing can happen

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  17th February 2020

        Geez, pity you didn’t listen to Mikey this morning, Duker. The PM was so vague it wasn’t funny. She fluffed around the Winston saga. She refused to deny straight away information Mikey had received regarding Labour hiking the tax on da witch to 45%.

        Poor Mikey, Even Phil Goff had a go at him during the open of another expensive cycle track for a few riders. The joke, of course, will ultimately be on Goff.

        The election cannot come soon enough

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  17th February 2020

          What tax hiked to 45%..usual Hosking gooblygook

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  17th February 2020

            No, he had it from good sources. The PM should have gone straight on the attack and said ” rubbish, we have no intention of doing that.” Nothing hard about saying that. But the PM vacillated while probably working out how to deny such a rumour without committing to a guarantee such would never happen.
            Typical sly socialist.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  17th February 2020

              Phil Goff was probably speaking for many people when he expressed delight that the petulant Mike H wants to leave NZ because the roadworks hold him up on the way to the hairdresser. Others have offered to contribute to the air fare.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  17th February 2020

              Hosking seems to have misunderstood or been disingenuous.

              The hike would be for those who don’t disclose their IRD number.

              If Corky means ‘the rich’, he should say so and not use baby-talk.

            • Corky

               /  17th February 2020

              Funny, I heard nothing about IRD numbers from the PM. Why didn’t she say something. What better time to deal with a smug, urbane and wealthy Rightie?

              Sarcasm:
              noun: sarcasm; plural noun: sarcasms
              The use of irony to mock or convey contempt.

              Geez…some people need to get edgeimcated.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  18th February 2020

              They do indeed, if you mean ‘educated’. I remember old men in my childhood thinking it funny to mispronounce educated in ways like that; it’s quite a nostalgia trip to hear it again.

              The higher tax rate for nondisclosure of IRD numbers came from the IRD’s website.

            • Corky

               /  18th February 2020

              Higher tax rates for non discloure have been in exsistence for over twenty years. I remember in the early 2000s my credit union asking me to supply my IRD number otherwise I would be taxed at the higest rate. Nothing new. What is new is a rumour Labour want to increase tax for the wealthy to 45%.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  18th February 2020

              Don’t believe it, then, if you think that the IRD are lying or mistaken about the about to be increased rate for non-declaration of one’s IRD number. If you think that Mike Hosking knows something that they don’t, so be it.

    • Blazer

       /  17th February 2020

      becoming burdened with debt,is probably ‘doing well’ in your book.
      ‘Bangladesh’s external debt doubled in the past five years, according to the report. A total of $44.3 billion more is also waiting in the pipeline, it says.
      As it looks set to get the ‘developing nation’ status by 2024, the rates of interest on loans offered by other countries and agencies are also increasing.
      Interest rate on loans from Japan International Cooperation Agency or JICA may increase from 0.1 percent to around 1 percent while the World Bank’s International Development Association has already pushed the rate from below 1 percent to 1.5 percent, according to Ruhul Amin.
      Asian Development Bank lends money at two levels. One is with 2 percent interest while the other is based on London Interbank Offered Rate or LIBOR, he said.
      China said Bangladesh would not need to pay more than 2 percent interest while India is not charging more than 1 percent, the ERD joint secretary said.
      Russia, however, is taking more than 4 percent interest for the $12.65 billion Rooppur Nuclear Power Plant Project. “Generally the interest rate is high in such deals,” the additional secretary said.’

      Reply
      • Indeed. Bangladesh risks falling Chinese debt trap as a result of joining China’s Belt and Road initiative, and its growing reliance on Chinese money could end up with Dhaka beholden to Beijing.

        Remember Sri Lanka’s experience, where Colombo had to cede control of its southern port of Hambantota to China in 2018 on a 99-year lease after it failed to repay its debts.

        Still, if Bangladesh can manage its Chinese debt then all kudos to them.

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  17th February 2020

        A debt is balanced by an asset and a commitment for the future. It can be good or bad depending on where that balance lies. At least by the account I linked it appears that Bangladesh is doing well which for a poor country is a big improvement on doing nothing with no debt.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  17th February 2020

          same template…

          Reply
        • Blazer

           /  18th February 2020

          around 97% of the money supply is created by interest bearing debt.

          The most common method of money creation is mortgages and business loans.

          The fractional reserve system means the money go round must constantly be renewed,as there is never enough ‘money’ in existence to purchase all the goods and services produced.
          That is why people are encouraged to spend to maintain ‘consumer confidence’…i.e borrowing to fund purchases that are actually in abundance.

          Reply
  5. just an addendum.. ‘Thieves Alley’ market day (octagon Dn, sat 15/2)
    I helped at a stall.. highlight : a visit from current minister MSD (Hon. C.S. MP) who seemed very interested in the ‘medicinal products’ on sale & talk on the ‘Reeferendum’. She took a handout leaflet

    ..then came back later, for a second look ! 🙂

    Reply
    • Sorry I missed this, I was away for the weekend.

      Reply
      • cheers PG.. 🙂

        btw: we had a ‘Legalise’ T-shirt raffle.. ($2) Im sure you would look cool in one !

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  17th February 2020

          Hey, Zedd! Could I entice you to buy one of our T-Shirts. It’s a little more expensive ($5) given it has more words, hence increased printers costs. It reads:

          ‘ Vote no to dak. The country is fugged enough as it is! ‘

          P&P is extra.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  17th February 2020

            That is gibberish.

            Reply
            • tautoko Kitty..
              more inane drivel from corky

              one thing that was very clear in my korero: Alcohol is the more harmful Drug & many folks are more concerned about it…. not from ‘herb’

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  18th February 2020

              I keep hearing that hard drug users start with dope, but that’s like saying that alcoholics start with beer (which most do, I would imagine) so beer drinking leads to alcoholism.

          • Corky

             /  17th February 2020

            ‘That is gibberish.’

            That sounds like someone who has partaken of the pipe.

            Everyone would be asking for the new strain called ‘Gibberish.’ 😂

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  17th February 2020

              No, it sounds like someone who recognises nonsense when they read it.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  17th February 2020

              If you don’t know what gibberish means, look it up.

              [Enough bickering from both of you please. PG]

        • Corky

           /  18th February 2020

          ”Tautoko Kitty..
          more inane drivel from Corky”

          One thing I have been clear about in my korero is alcohol is not more harmful than herb. Alcohol is more available and is etched into our national psyche, so it has a head start. Of course much depends on the mental and physical weaknesses of users.
          Either substance can have a devastating affect on users, or conversely a minimum affect on users.

          People like Zedd need to be met head on. Anti smacking legislation. Lowering of the drinking age. Principles of the Treaty. Gay marriage etc, were all promoted by people like Zedd. People who know the average Kiwi is half asleep and not too bright.

          Don’t let these people bs you.

          Reply
  6. USAG Bill Barr made a commitment at his last confirmation hearing, in which he reaffirmed that an Attorney General must prevent political influence from corrupting the course of justice in criminal cases.

    Just another lie.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  17th February 2020

      Rubbish. The judge decides the sentence, the prosecution only decides the charges. No corruption has occured.

      Reply
  7. I’ll see your ‘rubbish’ and raise you.

    There are over 1,100 legal experts including several former US attorneys appointed by both Republican and Democratic presidents and section chiefs of key elements of the justice department including its antiterrorism unit, who disagree with you. They’ve called for Barr’s resignation, writing that: “ Each of us strongly condemns President Trump’s and Attorney General Barr’s interference in the fair administration of justice,”

    They write that it is unheard of for top leaders of the justice department to overrule line prosecutors in order to give preferential treatment to close associates of the president. They say that amounts to political interference that is “anathema to the department’s core mission and to its sacred obligation to ensure equal justice under the law”.

    Frankly, they have wiser legal heads than you and me put together. But you don’t care. Trump doesn’t care. Barr doesn’t care. Senate republicans don’t care. Putin doesn’t care.

    What it boils down to is that you support Governments that use the enormous power of law enforcement to punish their political enemies and reward their allies.

    Reply
    • Apologies – was intended as a reply to Alan above.

      Reply
      • McCarthy makes his standpoint clear (as do you): Republican presidents have the right to intervene in the judicial process, as does the attorney general. Only a republican president. If a Democrat president attempts this it’s unconstitutional, communist, fascist, and they should be immediately impeached & removed from office.

        Bear in mind that Stone conducting a two year cover-up, including making threats against a judge, and threatening to kill another witness.

        Where a grand jury refused to even charge McCabe with”a lack of candour” (what he was investigated for), a grand jury indicted Stone on seven felony counts, and a jury of his peers found him guilty of every count with which he was charged.

        Which leads us back to Barr’s thumb on the scale of justice:
        Chairman: Mr. Barr, what is your position on candor under oath?
        Mr. Barr: My position, as a matter of personal safety, is keep as far away from it as possible.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  17th February 2020

          Prosecutors exist to interfere in the judicial process and judges are there to enforce fairness. There will be a ruling with reasoning and we can debate that when we have it.

          Reply
          • So now we have over 1,000 federal judges who consider Barr’s interventions to be an intolerable political interference in America’s justice system – on top of over 2,000 DOJ alumni who have now signed the letter in my post below.

            Alan’s flakey defence of Barr (and Trump) is looking less and less credible by the day…

            https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2020/02/17/roger-stone-sentence-judges-worried-political-interference/4788155002/

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  18th February 2020

              The federal prosecuotors are chosen by and serve at the pleasure of the President. The judges are just as political but can’t be fired like the prosecutors. 99.9% of cases aren’t politics so no one noticed but don’t kid yourself about how impartial it all is.
              Even in NZ when a vacancy for a district Court judge comes up local MPs concern themselves over who will get the nod, national party looks for strict judges while labour greens etc want community focused judges which means no corporate or commercial based judges are wanted.
              Any kiwi lawyer will tell a lot depends on the judge , the law isnt some sort of consistent guide you might hope it is

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  19th February 2020

              So these judges (yet to meet and decide what to do apparently) have decided to protest about political comments on judicial decisions by making political comments on administrative decisions.

        • 1,100 real prosecutors respectfully disagree with your bunkum, Alan.

          We, the undersigned, are alumni of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) who have collectively served both Republican and Democratic administrations. Each of us strongly condemns President Trump’s and Attorney General Barr’s interference in the fair administration of justice.

          As former DOJ officials, we each proudly took an oath to support and defend our Constitution and faithfully execute the duties of our offices. The very first of these duties is to apply the law equally to all Americans. This obligation flows directly from the Constitution, and it is embedded in countless rules and laws governing the conduct of DOJ lawyers. The Justice Manual — the DOJ’s rulebook for its lawyers — states that “the rule of law depends on the evenhanded administration of justice”; that the Department’s legal decisions “must be impartial and insulated from political influence”; and that the Department’s prosecutorial powers, in particular, must be “exercised free from partisan consideration.”

          All DOJ lawyers are well-versed in these rules, regulations, and constitutional commands. They stand for the proposition that political interference in the conduct of a criminal prosecution is anathema to the Department’s core mission and to its sacred obligation to ensure equal justice under the law.

          And yet, President Trump and Attorney General Barr have openly and repeatedly flouted this fundamental principle, most recently in connection with the sentencing of President Trump’s close associate, Roger Stone, who was convicted of serious crimes. The Department has a long-standing practice in which political appointees set broad policies that line prosecutors apply to individual cases. That practice exists to animate the constitutional principles regarding the even-handed application of the law. Although there are times when political leadership appropriately weighs in on individual prosecutions, it is unheard of for the Department’s top leaders to overrule line prosecutors, who are following established policies, in order to give preferential treatment to a close associate of the President, as Attorney General Barr did in the Stone case. It is even more outrageous for the Attorney General to intervene as he did here — after the President publicly condemned the sentencing recommendation that line prosecutors had already filed in court.

          Such behavior is a grave threat to the fair administration of justice. In this nation, we are all equal before the law. A person should not be given special treatment in a criminal prosecution because they are a close political ally of the President. Governments that use the enormous power of law enforcement to punish their enemies and reward their allies are not constitutional republics; they are autocracies.

          We welcome Attorney General Barr’s belated acknowledgment that the DOJ’s law enforcement decisions must be independent of politics; that it is wrong for the President to interfere in specific enforcement matters, either to punish his opponents or to help his friends; and that the President’s public comments on DOJ matters have gravely damaged the Department’s credibility. But Mr. Barr’s actions in doing the President’s personal bidding unfortunately speak louder than his words. Those actions, and the damage they have done to the Department of Justice’s reputation for integrity and the rule of law, require Mr. Barr to resign. But because we have little expectation he will do so, it falls to the Department’s career officials to take appropriate action to uphold their oaths of office and defend nonpartisan, apolitical justice.

          For these reasons, we support and commend the four career prosecutors who upheld their oaths and stood up for the Department’s independence by withdrawing from the Stone case and/or resigning from the Department. Our simple message to them is that we — and millions of other Americans — stand with them. And we call on every DOJ employee to follow their heroic example and be prepared to report future abuses to the Inspector General, the Office of Professional Responsibility, and Congress; to refuse to carry out directives that are inconsistent with their oaths of office; to withdraw from cases that involve such directives or other misconduct; and, if necessary, to resign and report publicly — in a manner consistent with professional ethics — to the American people the reasons for their resignation. We likewise call on the other branches of government to protect from retaliation those employees who uphold their oaths in the face of unlawful directives. The rule of law and the survival of our Republic demand nothing less.

          (my bold but their words)

          Reply
        • and before Alan tries gas-lighting us with some sort of fake claim along the lines that the Justice Department is rife with deep-state officials who are biased against Trump, remember this:

          all the investigations of the president have been initiated by Trump appointees.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  19th February 2020

            What rubbish. FBI/DoJ was investigating Trump before he was elected. Clinton/Obama were investigating him then too. The House was investigating him for impeachment under direction of the Democrats.

            Reply
  8. Reply
  9. Corky

     /  17th February 2020

    Baby Boomers may be becoming ill because of their amalgam fillings. No wonder dementia and Alzheimer’s disease rates are increasing.

    Here’s one reason why you should always take what health professionals say with a grain of salt.

    Quote:

    ”The Waikato District Health Board has recently gone amalgam free, and principal dental officer Rob Aitken told Summer Report it had been in the pipeline since 2016, but it was not mainly because of the perceived health risk.

    “It’s more to do with the environmental damage, because mercury is a cumulative poison and it builds up in the environment, so this is something that across the world DHBs and health professionals are moving to eliminate.”

    Unbelievable but true. I wonder if this chap realises his weird logic in that quote? I guess mud on your face is better than conceding you were wrong.

    Good to see Dr Mike Godfrey finally vindicated…or has he? The NZ Skeptics called poor Mike a quack. I admit has a unique manner( in a nice way). The Skeptics are yet to reply to my query as to whether they still consider him a quack.

    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/348114/amalgam-fillings-should-be-phased-out-dhb-dentist

    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE1801/S00034/nz-health-officials-proven-wrong-on-mercury-amalgam-fillings.htm

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  17th February 2020

      When the coronavirus was being discussed, you claimed to have rellies who were doctors and nurses. This was used as an argument to prove your superior knowledge. Now you say that we should take what medical professionals say with a pinch of salt (how original).

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  17th February 2020

        Amalgam has been used for fillings since 1830; and many reliable sources say that the rate of dementia and Alzheimers has gone down, not up, although the number of people who are living longer may make it seem that it has risen although the % of people who have it has dropped.

        Reply
    • Corky

       /  17th February 2020

      Given I have learnt my lessons with the way Kitty bends the truth and tells porkies, I now make sure I bookmark all her uterances. Yes, I did mention my rellies who are doctors and nurses ( also teachers and princpals). But it’s all about context. For those who haven’t fallen alseep, it will be quite easy to check the ”facts.”

      And the facts show Kitty’s thoughts on the Coronavirus and what I wrote are jumbled as usual.

      https://yournz.org/2020/01/27/coronavirus-concerns/#comment-394992

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  17th February 2020

        Total irrelevancy, and if you have nothing better to do than bookmark everything I say, I feel very sorry for you. That shows an obsessive personality. It’s rather creepy; are you a stalker?

        Your rellie was not a principal to begin with, and the fact that you claimed that she took 8 hours to prepare (was it a year’s work ?) made it an obvious lie that she was even a teacher.
        No teacher would spend so little time on preparation. I have been one, my mother was a deputy head and I know a lot of teachers.

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  17th February 2020

        Like a punch drunk boxer. The brain is incapable of telling the body to lie down and avoid further punishment. The mental processes spin endlessly regurgitating the past, and mixing it with the present. Thank God for bookmarks.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  17th February 2020

          I am not surprised that what you call your brain is in that condition. You seem to be extremely confused; you often contradict yourself. You tell us that you have rellies who are doctors and nurses, and then that doctors let people die rather than use alternative/new medicine and that we should treat health professionals’ words with a pinch of salt. You don’t know that the teaching position your relly holds doesn’t exist.

          You once tried to tell us that a tourist barged into the dentist’s office when you were there and demanded antibiotics for an abcessed tooth that he’d had out…as cruise ships have resident doctors and people have antibiotics BEFORE the abcessed tooth is treated, this could not possibly have been true. I don’t remember all your nonsensical statements, of course, only the most ridiculous ones like this and your obvious lies about my neighbours.

          You ought to bookmark and classify your fabrications so that you don’t contradict them later or try to deny them.

          Bookmarking everything that I say is extremely bizarre. It’s also stupid, because anyone who reads the one above will see that what you said is arrant nonsense and bears no resemblance to the views attributed to me. You didn’t even know that there are many coronaviruses. The number of downticks for you and upticks for me indicates that people don’t share your inflated opinion of your own cleverness.

          Reply
  10. I posted about this weeks ago, to much derision but it’s highly likely she’ll be running. It’ll be bigger than Ringling, Barnum and Bailey.

    https://www.businessinsider.com.au/clinton-wants-back-in-as-bloomberg-campaign-quiets-vp-speculation-2020-2?r=US&IR=T

    Reply
    • oh dear, Clinton coming back into a presidential race would be almost as bad as Trump winning another term.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  17th February 2020

        Depends on how desperate the Dems become.

        Reply
        • MaureenW

           /  17th February 2020

          They’re desperate and the Clintons own the Democratic Party. You can see all the jiggery pokery going on in the Democratic Caucus Elections .. I mean who have they got?

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  17th February 2020

            True..no one when you think about it. At least Trumpy can stay awake and put on a show.

            Reply
            • yeah nothing to worry about in the Trumpy camp … aside from the increasingly obvious signs of frontotemporal dementia… oh, and the stunning exposure of his criminality…

            • Corky

               /  18th February 2020

              Honestly, with the antics of the Dems and their dearth of talent, I wouldn’t be engaging a Trump supporter. But the Left always had this blindspot – an inability to judge what the average voter thinks,needs and wants.

  11. Corky

     /  17th February 2020

    One News tonight may have turned the election in Nationals favour. First, the PM was criticised over her handling of the NZ1 saga. Next, there was talk of an early election from Paula Bennett (birthing it into reality). While an early election may not happen, it is now out there, ready to grow a life of it’s own.

    Talking of Paula. She looked fine. Like a real stateswoman. Animated and dressed appropriately. Unfortunately, the news item then panned to Jacinda telling everyone that Winston’s business is not hers. She was shown repeating that twice. She looked like she had walked off the factory floor. Lanky dank hair and strained demeanour. Even the sign language guy looked to be having a little fun a one stage.

    Yep..a great news piece.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  18th February 2020

      It’s a pity Ardern has to come on looking like she had walked off the factory floor, lanky dank hair and strained demeanour and having to tell everyone twice that Winston’s business is not hers.

      She should have just said, “Fuck off, ask Winston.” You wouldn’t have worried about her appearance, would have claimed it was her business and sneered at her firmness of language.

      Recently we picked a load of home grown nectarines at a friend’s place. They looked a bit rough and ready. The ones at the supermarket looked, do look, picture perfect. Straight out out of the magazines. The not so good looking ones were the best, juiciest, most tasty nectarines we’ve ever had. Those from the market are over-stored, over ‘manufactured’, fancied up and tasteless and dull to eat.

      No surprise the thought of Bennett birthing an early election might turn you on.

      Reply
  12. Corky

     /  18th February 2020

    Cultural correctness catches up with dear old Plunket.

    https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/two-m-ori-midwives-helped-create-plunket-recognised-organisation-changes-name

    I go to a medical clinic that is so European oriented, it would make your eyes water. Prints from famous European masters adorn the walls. There’s not one anatomy chart in sight.
    The bathrooms are mock 18 century replicas. And the water station has smaller cups to accommodate the refined breeding of people like me. There’s also free organic health bars made by Dawn from all natural ingredients.

    Imagine my shock and horror when I recently visited to find a tekoteko staring at me. Worse,
    all signs had their Maori equivalents underneath.

    Money, money money, it’s a white man’s world is now….truly defunct.😪

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  18th February 2020

      Don Brash had an interesting interview on Magic Radio. It concerned a factually incorrect historical resource used for teaching intermediate kids at school. Don outlined the inaccuracies. The author of the resource wouldn’t appear. Of course he wouldn’t because he knows Sean isn’t a patsy interviewer.

      Brash has written to Hipkins. Early days yet..but no reply. Of course not, Don. These are sly socialists.

      One can only shudder at what this government will introduce into schools if they are reelected.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  18th February 2020

        !8th century houses didn’t have bathrooms.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  18th February 2020

          18th.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  18th February 2020

            There’s a better name for it , of Germanic origin , what Corky has described is kitsch.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  18th February 2020

              Or traume (German for dreams)

              As there were no bathrooms in the real sense of the word in the c.18, it’s hard to imagine what a replica would be. Indoor loos didn’t come in until later, although flush ones had been invented. Some Regency houses in Bath still have the famous ‘hanging loos of Bath’ on the outside of them. These were put there after the very early inside ones had the pipes burst in an exceptionally cold winter, with predictable results. These were the exception; most people had earth closets (or similar) during much of the 19th and even 20th century

              18th century people who had baths would have them in the bedroom where they would be filled and emptied by hand. There were commodes, but chamber pots were common. Perhaps that’s what the medical centre has. Hip baths, wash stands and gazunders.

      • Duker

         /  18th February 2020

        Since when did Don Brash become. ‘historian’… He wasn’t all that good at economics either, but he the PhD which came him some credibility. I suppose nowdays Cullen could run rings around him with his doctorate in ‘economic history’ and show how the stuff Don was tuaght 50 years ago is out of date and discredited .

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  18th February 2020

          If I remember correctly, Brash has some type of history degree. Of course this debate could have been settled smartly if Brash’s critics had shown up. I thought they would have relished a chance to throw more mud in Don’s face. Guess not..huh?

          But never fear. Brash is on record. So what he says is either factually correct, or not. I will try to find the relevant clip.

          In the meantime…do try to keep up!

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  18th February 2020

            His first degrees were in economics, history and political science; he is a PhD in economics.

            Reply
          • Duker

             /  18th February 2020

            His specialty was always economics, history was a minor for his undergraduate degree and then did Masters and PhD in Economics. As I said he’s no historian .
            Some people here really do have a good grasp of history, so what this fallacy he has discovered that is twisting those formative minds

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  18th February 2020

              And like I said: He is either right or wrong. He is on record. Once the show is posted, I will post it here.

      • Corky

         /  18th February 2020

        Oops! Sorry guys. Of course I forgot. It should have been 19th century; maybe early 20th. I’m no expert. Sorry you wasted so much effort on a trifle.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  18th February 2020

          No effort was involved, I knew this already. I used to live in Bath so have seen the ‘hanging loos’.and know enough history to know about what houses would and wouldn’t have at various times.

          Even a c.19 or early c.20 bathroom would be an odd thing to find in a medical centre; do people have baths while they’re there ? My GP’s surgery is in an old house, and the loos are in keeping with it albeit with modern plumbing rather than the chain flushes that the house would probably have had, but there are no bathrooms, just loos with basins. If your one has replica Victorian/Edwardian ones, I wonder where they found the wooden cisterns with chains that the loos had in that era.

          Reply
      • Blazer

         /  18th February 2020

        ‘ It concerned a factually incorrect historical resource used for teaching ‘..hilarious!..there are hundreds if not thousands of..them.

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  18th February 2020

        magic radio!…do me a favour!

        Reply
  13. Corky

     /  18th February 2020

    Er, Pete. A heads up on the next super food that is more suited to South Island conditions. This berry is reputed to have a better nutrient profile than Blueberries. That is saying something.

    https://www.grownups.co.nz/life/gardening/havent-heard-haskaps-read/

    http://www.lovehoneyberry.com/new-zealand-honeyberries/

    Rory Harding is a breeder located in Dunedin.

    Reply
    • Interesting. We grow a range of berries here now. I’d try growing some of these if I could get them, but it seems that could be difficult at this stage.

      Reply
  14. Duker

     /  18th February 2020

    Finally someone has a few home truths
    The coronavirus crisis was made in China, but no one will say it

    It may be a made-in-China global pandemic, and China might have bungled its handling of it, but that’s somehow irrelevant and China’s government says it’s “unhappy” with Australia. Come again?
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/the-coronavirus-crisis-was-made-in-china-but-no-one-will-say-it-20200217-p541hk.html

    That same line is being said by the Chinese ambassador here

    Reply

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