Open Forum – 29 February

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32 Comments

    • Duker

       /  29th February 2020

      It was a wholesaler…who generally supply small supermarkets but do ‘cashand carry’ for regular customers .

      Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th February 2020

      If someone finds photos of supermarket customers interesting, I suppose they’d find these ones interesting…but really, one supermarket looks much like another.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  29th February 2020

      Observation and extrapolation. Two very good friends of the wise. Not so important for point scoring time wasters though.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  29th February 2020

        There is a variety of people there; all different skin colours. There seems little to be ‘extrapolated’ from that. The darkskinned man in the first photo could be from any number of ethnic backgrounds, and there are plenty of Pakehas in the others.

        The only thing to be observed is that people of all races use that supermarket. Were you trying to make a racist point ?

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  29th February 2020

        Kitty says:

        ”There is a variety of people there; all different skin colours.”

        Please..it’s Asians all the way. Unless I’m looking at another clip( slight exaggeration applied)

        But why Asians..where are Maori, European and Islanders in relative numbers?

        1- Are Asians more prone to panic?
        2- Have overseas rellies told them concerning details our media aren’t privy to?
        3- Do Asians have a support network that provides them with advice and support. A network that maybe is supported by the mother country? Does the mother country want its expats ready to take advantage of situations that may arise from social disorder?
        4- Does the clip show a mindset that morphs into other areas of Asian life. A mindset that is alien to us even though these folk live in our midst?
        5- What does it say about us?

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  1st March 2020

          As most of those people are seen from the back, it would be absurd to claim that they are ‘Asian’ (do you mean Chinese ? Asian is not a nationality)

          If you are determined that the people in the photos are ‘Asian’, it would be pointless to try to make you see reason.

          The other questions are bizarre and not worth answering.

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  1st March 2020

          ”Observation and extrapolation. Two very good friends of the wise.”

          A picture paints a thousand words…for some people at least.

          ”The other questions are bizarre and not worth answering.”

          See top sentence.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  1st March 2020

            The cliche is that a picture is worth a thousand words, or it’s meaningless.. The idea that it’s possible to guess someone’s nationality from their blurred back view is absurd. Pictures need context. A photo of people in a supermarket is not evidence of anything.

            The ‘top sentence’ (‘Observation and extrapolation’.) isn’t one.

            Asia is a continent, not a country and is made up of many countries and nationalities.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  1st March 2020

              A proper look at the photos shows that many of the people in the second photo are, in fact, Pakeha, judging by their skin colour. The ones in front on the last one are, and as the rest are in semi-darkness it’s impossible to tell. One looks as if she may be from an ‘Asian’ background.

            • Corky

               /  1st March 2020

              ”You use the phrase ‘A Picture Paints a Thousand Words’ to indicate that a picture or impression can express a complex idea in the same way a large amount of descriptive text can.”

              Ah,literal translation of ‘paints.’ It’s that literal thing again.

              ”The idea that it’s possible to guess someone’s nationality from their blurred back view is absurd. Pictures need context.”

              To silly for words. Maybe Kitty’s link isn’t working properly. Here, I will repost.

              https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2020/02/coronavirus-queues-at-supermarkets-as-panic-buying-ramps-up.html

              ”Asia is a continent, not a country and is made up of many countries and nationalities.”

              Correct:

              People from countries in Asia…Asians.
              People from countries in South America…South Americans.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  4th March 2020

              That doesn’t mean that Asian is a nationality, any more than European is.Indians and Koreans are totally different.

              There are a number of very obviously Pakeha people in those photos, like the woman in pink and the one with a white top and black trousers…and the man in the same photo. Hint; the hair and skin colour.

              If the link hadn’t worked, I couldn’t have seen that the people were Pakeha and not all ‘Asian’.

  1. Corky

     /  29th February 2020

    Another two murders in Auckland. Firearms involved in one incident. Just imagine what it will be like if cannabis is legalised?

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th February 2020

      Is there any connection between those two things ?

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  29th February 2020

      Kitty askes a question Pete has already broadly asked:

      ”Is there any connection between those two things ?”

      Well, concerning these two individual cases I don’t know. However, when someone askes such a question, it is pointless to proceed with an explanation. Best to let things play out then explain to them why that is

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  29th February 2020

        In other words, there is no connection.

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  29th February 2020

        In other words I’m not wasting my time explaining.

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  29th February 2020

        I will bookmark this for a later date, should Dak be legalised. My points will be self explanatory as the murder and assault rates spiral out of control.

        Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  1st March 2020

    This column in the Telegrsph is too good to be hidden behind a paywall:

    From Coronavirus to climate, medieval thinking has triggered an epidemic of self-loathing
    JANET DALEY

    29 FEBRUARY 2020 • 1:00PM

    We seem to have woken up in the Middle Ages

    We must all have been transported backwards in our sleep, because we seem to have woken up in the Middle Ages – to a world of child saints and plague towns and apocalyptic helplessness. To push the medieval analogy to its logical end, we could end up attributing both the coronavirus and what is now inevitably described as a “climate emergency” to divine retribution: punishment for the sins of globalisation and the pursuit of mass prosperity.

    Surely, the soothsayers will conclude, people were not meant to travel so far and so frequently from their place of birth. Nor should the goods that they produce be shipped to all corners of the earth to be consumed in alien lands. In the quest for ever-greater wealth, we have lost touch with our roots and our sacred places. This terrible End of Days is a warning…

    Well, perhaps it hasn’t quite reached this point of absurdity but give it another few weeks. (In fact, the most extreme form of climate activism already talks like this.) What is truly alarming about the response to this phenomenon in its varied forms – floods, virus, whatever – is its failure to allude to the obvious: the remarkable capacity of human intelligence for invention, adaptation and co-operation. Instead of emphasising the virtues that have permitted the most ingenious species of life ever to inhabit the planet to alter and affect the conditions in which it can survive, this bizarre cult of guilt demands endless remorse.

    Instead of hope through rational progress, the message is overwhelmingly of blame. Even while demanding positive change, Extinction Rebellion manages to sound as if it loathes everybody (or maybe just everybody in the Western world since it oddly fails to stage any protests at the Chinese embassy) and will be satisfied with nothing less than total self-abnegation. Indeed, some climate emergency spokesmen openly long for a radical reduction in the world’s population – so maybe the advent of coronavirus suits them quite well.

    The most extreme interpretations of data are presented as objective fact. The most terrifyingly tendentious projections dominate the public discourse so aggressively that any expression of doubt appears irresponsible. But the encouragement of panic is the very opposite of responsibility: it is conducive to hasty, unsound decisions as desperation replaces reasoned argument.

    No one can deny that the floods that have caused such havoc in the English regions are genuinely tragic for those whose homes and businesses have been destroyed. But to count as evidence of an imminent and inevitable change in the climate, they have to beat the 1990 February rainfall record of 193.4 mm. As of 25 February, this year’s total was 179.3 mm.

    You may say that even if the “climate emergency” talk is overblown, it can do no harm to behave as if it were literally accurate and take the precautions that might mitigate the damage. This may be true but only if it does not distract from what might be a more practically remedial problem: many experts, including some eminently well-informed letter writers to this newspaper, have suggested that the management of rivers is the more immediate cause of the current flooding. If that is the case, then evangelical climate activism with its insistence that the only possible remedies involve drastic restrictions on economic growth, could actually be a hindrance to finding an effective solution.

    This alternative view of the twin crises that are currently dominating the news cycle – climate and coronavirus – was put into interesting perspective by Mark Carney in his last interview as Governor of the Bank of England. What he told Sky News was that (contrary to the rabble rousing XR rhetoric) the need to deal with the new dilemmas could eventually accelerate economic growth: research, discovery and innovation would create more opportunities for employment and investment. That is how free market societies have generally seen the need for change – as an open field for opportunity, not an excuse for contraction. To put it even more baldly: that is the difference between rationality and superstition.

    Something has gone badly wrong when the world passively accepts flagellation from a teenage girl who was, by her own and her parents’ admission, suffering from serious mental disturbance before finding a miraculous deliverance through leadership of her climate campaign. I have all the sympathy in the world for the kind of psychological breakdown which so many adolescent girls experience as they encounter the shock of female puberty. But I draw the line at sacrificing the prosperity and security of the populations of the world (including parts of it which have, until very recently, lived in poverty) for the sake of providing therapy.

    Of course, there is ambivalence among the governing classes over this public mood. Having the population’s consciousness focused on what seem to be acts of God (virus epidemics) or events of such cosmic enormity that they appear to dwarf the power of individual states (climate change) could be quite useful. It takes people’s minds off of the day-to-day business which elected leaders are expected to handle. But when the markets begin to crash and real incomes – both in earnings and profits – are threatened, it then becomes very hard to restore morale. This is what wartime governments have always known: don’t ever let despair get the upper hand.

    So can we just remind ourselves that human beings are not dinosaurs? They are not dumb galumphing creatures, incapable of understanding and adapting to circumstances, fated to be swept away by incomprehensible events. With their outsize brains and opposable thumbs, they have triumphed over adversity and challenge many times. They will invent their way out of climate change without sending us all back to pre-industrial subsistence, and somebody will discover (probably quite soon) a way to vaccinate against this latest virus outbreak.

    But for now we must deal with the epidemic of self-loathing. Time for the grown-ups to get a grip.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  1st March 2020

      ‘ But when the markets begin to crash and real incomes – both in earnings and profits – are threatened, it then becomes very hard to restore morale. ‘

      Yes Al….’they paved Paradise and put up a parking lot’….and only charge $30 a day to park…there.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  1st March 2020

        The eco-loons think a mangrove swamp is Paradise but actually it is the parking lot that paved over the paradise that used to be there.

        Reply
  3. An example of the nastiness of social media.

    Australia is entirely within its rights to send back New Zealand citizen crims, no matter how long they have been in Australia.

    Only problem of course is we get them.

    Better that these animals be put on a military aircraft, flown out over the Tasman sea, and air dropped, Argentine dirty war style.

    That would be the best outcome – both for Australia, and New Zealand.

    https://thestandard.org.nz/do-not-deport-your-people-and-your-problems-to-new-zealand/#comment-1688402

    Reply
  4. Another example of the nastiness of social media.

    Reply
  5. Corky

     /  1st March 2020

    How white middleclass NZ are sucked in with a mix of truth, half truths and plain bs. I found this painful to watch because I only needed one look at the intervee to know her life story and personality. Hayley… you were sucked in.

    https://play.stuff.co.nz/details/_6136607806001

    Reply
  6. Corky

     /  1st March 2020

    Greece now in a fight for its life. Will they be the first Western country to technically fall to immigration and refugees? How ironic should that happen.

    https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/02/greece-defensive-turkey-opens-border-refugees-200229091808379.html

    Reply
  7. If accurate this sounds bad for Iran – and potentially elsewhere. The virus has spread to New Zealand and Australia from Iran.

    Reply
    • There’s more on that Twitter thread.

      Reply

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