‘Bring back nature’

This is enhanced with full screen and plenty of sound.

The unanimous view here (two adults, two children) is that this is very cool.

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22 Comments

  1. Gerrit

     /  1st March 2020

    Where are the humans? Are they not part of nature?

    Unless one addresses the issue of how to cloth, feed and shelter 7 billion humans. There is no way nature will reestablish like a musical score.

    The rest of nature needs to adept to coexisting with the 7 billion humans or face extinction.

    Or 7 billion humans need to be extinguished so that nature (under Darwins laws) will reestablish itself to a new world order.

    Reply
    • Obviously humans have to fit in with nature. But areas of natural environment without humans or human effects are an important part of the mix.

      Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  1st March 2020

      It’s a pretty little video, but it’s basically flawed, I think, and certainly simplistic.

      Many people are doing their best for ‘nature’ already..

      Reply
  2. Barbara McKenzie

     /  1st March 2020

    The primacy of ‘nature’ over humanity comes out of the same stable as ‘global warming’. The idea is that ‘biodiversity’ in the form of the least insect must always trump human happiness and human rights. Thus the plan for Wellington city, which has ample reserves, is that human beings be confined as much as possible to apartments, while as much space as possible is declared to be reserve land, via the (illegal) Significant Natural Areas (SNA) policy. So any space between houses that is big enough, ie 0.5 hectares, is deemed to be a nature reserve, no matter what is growing: gorse, pine, agapanthus, rhododendon shrubbery. There are of course property right issues: people will now have to get permission, presumably under the RMA, for permission to subdivide, add on a room, build a shed, plant a camellia.

    Meanwhile suburban gardens are anathema. According to council candidates last year, the 250 school children who participated in its consultation process, want a compact vibrant city. School children are deemed to be the best people to make decisions on everything from town planning to climate change, because they are going to live longer. So when teenagers decide that a child friendly city is one with groovy cafes rather than backyards to play in, there is nothing more to be said.

    Nobody asks the wildlife of course. The birds, bees and bugs actually like our gardens with their trees and shrubs, exotic or native. They probably won’t be that enthusiastic about the cherry trees and laburnums (wood pigeons love laburnums) being replaced by fast-growing, flowerles natives of inferior quality. Ex deputy-mayor Jill Day told us that ‘it’s not about people’. Truth is, it’s not about the environment either.

    Reply
  3. Duker

     /  1st March 2020

    yes they tried the ‘wilding’ of existing farmland’ in the Netherlands
    In winter, many froze to death as there wasnt enough feed, remember this isnt a farm anymore and you cant just feed out and starvation is ‘natures way’

    Roughly 25 miles east of the Dutch capital, they pass a nature reserve called the Oostvaardersplassen, where herds of red deer, wild horses and cattle roam free.

    The 5,000-hectare plot is supposed to provide a rare haven for wildlife in one of Europe’s most densely-populated countries. But when the weather turns cold, it can become more of a prison.
    That’s because the creatures which inhabit this low-lying expanse of marsh and grassland find themselves with very little to eat.

    Slowly, but surely, they starve to death. In particularly hostile winters, when the ground can freeze solid, hundreds — and sometimes thousands — perish, filling fields next to the railway tracks with emaciated corpses.

    This appalling spectacle, which has occurred several times in recent years, is the result of an experiment in ‘rewilding’ — a trendy, but for some, highly controversial form of land management in which large areas of countryside are allowed to revert to nature.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8057699/How-trendy-metropolitan-eco-zealots-set-driving-farming-rewilding-land.html

    Reply
    • Griff.

       /  2nd March 2020

      The problem in Oostvaardersplassen is well known.
      No apex predator like wolves to keep the large herbivores in check.
      Ecology’s are surprising complex.

      Reply
  4. Corky

     /  1st March 2020

    ”The primacy of ‘nature’ over humanity comes out of the same stable as ‘global warming’’

    Yes, many Greenie idealists believe Gaia must be allowed to regenerate the earth without human interference. Read that whichever way you want. The bottom line is it has the same idiocy about it, as does man made global warming.

    Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  1st March 2020

    Plenty of nature here. My auto rat trap keeps a bit of a check on it. Three chooks and at least one bunny have also taken up residence without being invited.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  1st March 2020

      What’s your fly problem like up North? For me, it’s the first time I can remember house flies have been almost non existent compared with other years. Same with white fly on plants. Usually, I will spray Neem oil twice in spring/ summer to control white fly. This year there’s been no white fly. Very unusual.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  2nd March 2020

        A few flies around in Feb but not much of a problem. Pretty normal I think. The little fruit fly midges are the most annoying.

        Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  2nd March 2020

        Yes, we have fewer flies inside but have planted pyretherm plants near the house plus now have a screen door over the ranch slider. One thing I have noticed an abundance off are bees. We planted a row of phohutakawa bushes (dwarf) to line the drive and front path and when in flower these attract the bees in fairly large numbers.

        Maybe we just need to change what plants we have to attract (or deflect) the right insects.

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  2nd March 2020

          Good initiatives there Gerrit.
          Good to hear bees are in abundance.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  2nd March 2020

            Alan, are the fruit flies tiny brown ones ? I have had a lot, but they seem to have taken off now. I never remember having so many for so long.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  2nd March 2020

              They are tiny but I would have said black rather than brown. Seem to be fly spray resistent too.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd March 2020

              Mine were brown. The problem with spraying the little buggers is that they move so fast. I use flyspray as a last resort. They were in the container that scraps for the compost bin go into (how they squeezed in is a mystery) and I flipped the lid up and sprayed. It worked.

            • Kitty Catkin

               /  2nd March 2020

              The little ones here did land on flypaper, but there were still a lot zipping around. A few days ago they all vanished. They’d be about sandfly or mozzie size.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  2nd March 2020

          Dwarf pohutukawas ??? I didn’t know there were such things.

          Reply
  6. Blazer

     /  1st March 2020

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  2nd March 2020

      I have that on an LP that I found in an opshop; Loxene Golden Discs.

      Reply

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