New threats directed at mosque being investigated

New threats have been made online against the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch that was the target of a mass shooting nearly a year ago.

While online attacks on Muslims have continued since the massacre I think this latest threat is more likely to strengthen defence and support of Muslims in New Zealand.

Stuff:  Worshippers at the Al Noor mosque photographed in terror threat

Members of Christchurch’s Al Noor mosque have increased their security measures following an apparent terror threat, two weeks before the first anniversary of the March 15 attack in which 51 worshippers were gunned down.

The threat was issued on Sunday night on an encrypted messaging app, accompanied by a photo of a masked man sitting in a car outside the mosque.

A police spokeswoman has confirmed an investigation into the threat is under way.

The threat and accompanying photo was posted anonymously to more than 2000 followers on a messaging channel on the encrypted communication app Telegram.

The image shows a man wearing dark sunglasses and a balaclava printed with an image of a human skull. Through a car window the front of the Al Noor mosque can be seen.

In the background, four people are visible at the entrance of the mosque.

The message attached, written in both English and Russian, implies the people at the “same mosque” would be greeting each other for the “last time”. A gun emoji, or symbol, is also used in the message.

The image was posted on a messaging channel dedicated to celebrating the March 15 terror attack.

A very small minority involved, but this is still insidious.

RNZ: Muslims on high alert after report of threat against Christchurch mosque

On Sunday, members of the Al Noor Mosque were the subject of a reported terror threat, which police are investigating.

The Islamic Women’s Council’s national co-ordinator, Anjum Rahman, said the threat was the fourth she was aware of since the attacks.

“We have been talking to authorities for some months, since last year, definitely, about preparations coming into 15 March,” Rahman said.

“Absolutely, we were expecting this and possibly worse things.”

Rahman said racist and xenophobic extremists were emboldened by the 15 March attack.

“There were two things that happened after the mosque attacks,” she said.

“The first was that huge outpouring of solidarity and support, but the other thing that happened at the same time was that people that were that way inclined felt emboldened and strengthened and more connected.

“The negative and hateful commentary online has not stopped, and I believe it influences the way these people think.”

She said the current political environment meant that people “who aren’t the targets of these kinds of threats have a louder voice than those who are vulnerable to them”.

It’s not just anonymous online extremists being called out.

Newsroom: Jones’ attacks on Indian students a timely reminder

It is extraordinary that as we approach the one-year anniversary of a devastating terror attack at two Christchurch mosques by a white supremacist, a senior politician has directed an inflammatory broadside against the Indian student community in New Zealand.

Shane Jones, the New Zealand First Minister for Infrastructure, Forestry and Regional Economic Development in the Labour-led Coalition Government, said on Saturday New Zealand’s current immigration policy is “unfettered” and specifically attacked students from India who, in his view, “have ruined many of those [academic] institutions” they have attended in this country.

While this is not the first time prominent figures have resorted to xenophobic dog whistle politics in an election year, the Christchurch atrocity highlighted the very real dangers of allowing such narratives to go unchallenged.

But Jones’ comments on Saturday are a reminder that some New Zealand politicians still do not recognise that the battle against extremism after Christchurch begins at home and that there is a responsibility to refrain from words and actions that encourage intolerance, exclusion and even violence.

In this context, not only are Jones’ words racist and inflammatory, they are also wrong. It is important to emphasise that there is no evidence whatsoever to support his specific allegations regarding Indian students, or other groups of international students more generally.

That was written by Professor Harlene Hayne, Vice-Chancellor and Robert Patman, a Professor of International Relations, both from the University of Otago.

Prime Minister Ardern has ‘reprimanded’ Jones but he seems unrepentant, saying he has a mandate from NZ First to ‘contually speak’ about immigration – see Ardern says Jones was loose and wrong, but Jones unrepentant.

Police say they expect to take action over the person or people involved in the latest threats made against Al Noor mosque.

Leave a comment

22 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  3rd March 2020

    Yawn… The Vice chancellors dont mention this and being Newsroom who only looks at one side of any issue
    https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/410566/surge-in-indian-student-visa-refusals-in-2019

    “Melville said Immigration was still refusing applications because it suspected fraud in documents showing students had sufficient funds to support themselves, a problem that surfaced some years ago.

    She said it had also seen cases of what it called “crowd-funding”.

    Reply
  2. artcroft

     /  3rd March 2020

    Appalling to hear of new threats to the mosque. What goes through the heads of people like those making these threats. Well and truly beyond me.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  3rd March 2020

      Be thankful that you don’t know what it feels like to be one of these sadists.

      Reply
  3. Corky

     /  3rd March 2020

    It’s a non event. Real terrorists don’t big note in front of their supposed target. They just do what they intend to do.

    ”I think this latest threat is more likely to strengthen defence and support of Muslims in New Zealand.”

    Well, that’s the problem isn’t it, Pete. Muslims were already sacrosanct before the mosque attacks. After the mosque attacks they are now completely untouchable. Asking for any balanced reporting on Islam from our media would be like asking them to stop speaking pidgin English…it ain’t gonna happen.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  3rd March 2020

      “Real terrorists don’t big note in front of their supposed target. They just do what they intend to do.”
      really , they are completely rational ?
      Isnt the whole point of the original attack – big noting by an insignificant and irrational man, we arent talking highly trained ‘operatives’ here.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  3rd March 2020

        You have things mixed up. You are talking after the fact. There’s also a difference between hardcore believers, and show-boaters looking to outrage for attention. That has worked in this instant.

        I take it you haven’t been in a street fight, Dukes. If you had you would know precisely what I mean.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  3rd March 2020

          Spontaneous street fights have what in common with terrorist attacks either by lone wolfs or groups that are preplanned. Didnt Tarrant visit the area of the Christchurch mosques as he lived in Dunedin.
          And he was a show boater extraordinaire with his live streaming.

          Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  3rd March 2020

          There seems little connection between a massacre of innocent people at prayer and a street fight, and the idea that the people at the mosque are attention-seekers is a gross insult. They didn’t publicise this threat. The loony who made it did.

          The Muslim baby whom I was playing with in The Warehouse today was about the age of the one who ran smiling towards his murderer last year.

          I haven’t been in a street fight, needless to say, but I have seen several. One, in Belgium, ended with a knifing that I witnessed.

          Reply
        • Corky it’s the ranting of the “showboaters looking to outrage for attention” who spur on the “hardcore believers”.

          They are like schoolkids congregated around a schoolyard scrap shouting “fight, fight, fight”

          You don’t need to look any further than Trump’s “lock her up” call at rallies to understand how that incites others to full-blown violence.

          Reply
  4. Blazer

     /  3rd March 2020

    ‘ Asking for any balanced reporting on Israel from our media would be like asking them to stop speaking pidgin English…it ain’t gonna happen.’

    Reply
  5. Zedd

     /  3rd March 2020

    we need to beware ‘false flags’ ;
    >folks who claim to be on one side, but may actually not be ?!

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  3rd March 2020

      That’s the great thing about our media, Zedd…no false flags; just a verbiage of biased stories in favour of the Left, Maori, Liberals, Muslims, Palestinians,anyone anti Trump, climate change, bike lanes and general feralism. Simple really! 🤔

      Reply
  6. Corky

     /  3rd March 2020

    Apparently Ethiopians and other black Jews discovered that when they gave blood it was discarded. Not good…but not a surprise to me. I support Israel…but I don’t put them on a pedestal.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  3rd March 2020

      Reply to Duker above.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  3rd March 2020

        I doubt if Israel would find your support flattering.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  3rd March 2020

          The blood story happened 25 or so years ago, and was done because the virus that causes AIDS was much more prevalent then among Ethiopians and other Africans.

          The blood was quietly discarded so as not to stigmatise Africans. The virus can take 6 months to develop, and then the tests wouldn’t show it. I don’t know how the tests work now, but this was in 1990s.

          Reply
    • Kitty and Corky, you might both find this paper interesting…

      Seeman, D. (1999). “One people, one blood”: Public health, political violence, and HIV in an Ethiopian-Israeli setting. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 23, 159–195.

      Click to access seeman.pdf

      Reply

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