International escalation of Covid-19 and travel restrictions

International spread of the Covid-19 coronavirus and measures to try to limit or slow the spread – a lot of the world is going into virtual lockdown.

Coronavirus Cases:

154,273

Deaths:

5,798

Recovered:

74,262

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

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21 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  15th March 2020

    2009 Swine flu pandemic – between 150,000 and 500,000 fatalities worldwide

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_flu_pandemic

    Whats different now is social media panic

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  15th March 2020

      In 2009 New Zealand had 3,175 cases and 19 deaths due to swine influenza.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_flu_pandemic_in_New_Zealand

      Normal deaths in NZ from all influenza viruses is around 100 per year

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  15th March 2020

        I thought that, but some sources say 4-500 a year.

        I can’t remember if there was the hysteria and paranoia then or not. I think that there was some, but it wasn’t as bad as this lot.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  15th March 2020

          Yes, it’s about 500 (so higher than the road toll) and more than 200,000 people catch it every year. The % is lower than Covid, but I can’t see us having 200,000 cases of that.

          Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  15th March 2020

        So obviously both the infectiousness and mortality rates of swine flue were far lower.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  15th March 2020

          Swine flu mortality rate was 0.02%. Coronavirus is two orders of magnitude worse on current estimates.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  15th March 2020

            Because it came directly from China , I think the peak deaths is concentrated earlier rather than spread over longer time- which is what the medical specialists want to be able to cope with the severest cases
            As well flu vaccines are very common even then especially for vulnerable, while no corona virus one is available

            Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  15th March 2020

      So in round figures, the number of CASES of C19 is the same as the MINIMUM estimate of DEATHS from SARS. And there were 500 times as many people here with SARS as there are of C19.

      Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  15th March 2020

    Australia follows NZ to self isolate all Incoming passengers.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  15th March 2020

      Also cruise ships but only for 30 days.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  15th March 2020

        I’m sure the Australian thing was coordinated with NZ… Maybe agreement that we would start first

        Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  15th March 2020

        Spotted a cruise ship in the BOI Thursday morning, lucky this is coming towards the end of the season.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  15th March 2020

          We’ve had heaps. Prob about 60 visits this summer. Sometimes two at time. Doubt there’ll be any next summer.

          Reply
  3. Alan Wilkinson

     /  15th March 2020
    Reply
    • Patzcuaro

       /  15th March 2020

      It seems to me not enough people in NZ are being tested to get a better picture of what’s happening. The recent cases seem to be in bound tourists, under the current situation should people still be travelling?

      We missed dial my sister recently, late February, she has been living just south of Munich. Turned out she was in Venice for the carnival, just as the virus was spreading in northern Italy. Her partner is a teacher in Bavaria, so they headed back after the reduced carnival and he went back to school for a week before being sent home because of the north Italian connection. Should he have self isolated on his return for Italy?

      Reply
  4. Patzcuaro

     /  15th March 2020

    I’ve seen reports that Italy may have to ration their medical response to Coronavirus as their health system is overwhelmed.

    Reply
  5. Patzcuaro

     /  15th March 2020

    Here is a history of our 8 coronavirus cases, how can you get tested but travel before you are notified of the result? Patient 7 staggering.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120105345/coronavirus-what-we-know-about-the-five-new-zealand-coronavirus-patients

    Reply
  6. david in aus

     /  15th March 2020

    I hate to say it but this is a situation where Modern Monetary Theory may be useful. We are witnessing a combination of global pandemic coupled with a global financial crisis. Nearly everything is being sold off: high yield debt, equities, commodities, and even gold mining companies when the gold price is holding up. There are forced sellers who have to indiscriminately sell. The real economy is also being affected by sudden stops in cash flows which will result in widespread bankruptcies unless there is some sort of intervention.

    This could morph into the first global depression since the 1930s.

    NZ may be spared with death and morbidity in the short term but unless there is a vaccine for coronavirus, which never has been done before, the virus will percolate into NZ eventually. NZ will not escape.

    This may be a situation for a global debt jubilee.

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  15th March 2020

      Have you thought about the other side of this situation? That’s when we come out of the pandemic and try to pick the pieces up. Supply lines destroyed. Maybe critical producers gone or damaged beyond repair. Bureaucracy tightening up again after allowing some slack to compensate for the pandemic. People who have taken advantage of the situation to gain power. It seems pretty bleak whichever way you look at it.

      Reply
    • david in aus

       /  16th March 2020

      The economic effects of the virus may kill more people than the virus itself.

      In Fukushima, the panic from evacuating from the nuclear reactor killed many fold more people in terms of heart attacks, car accidents, than the radiation.

      Reply

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