Prepare for lockdown

Rumours were rife in Australia on Tuesday that an internal lockdown announcement was imminent. That didn’t eventuate.

Here in New Zealand on Thursday afternoon internal lockdown rumours swirled – see Covid-19: Rumours, lockdowns and anxiety-fuelled social sharing – but media didn’t go public with the information. The  borders only were locked to anyone except New Zealand citizens and permanent residents. Australia followed suit.

But it looks likely we are headed for some degree of internal lockdown. From an interview on RNZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern…

…reiterated her message to be prepared, saying New Zealanders should be prepared to work from home and be prepared to cancel non-essential travel.

She said more than that, clearly implying the regional lockdowns were distinct possibilities, as was a national stay at home order, as has happened in a number of countries already, and has just been announced in California.

And Scott Morrison is signalling similar for Australia: PM flags further internal travel restrictions

Mr Morrison said Australians should “reconsider the need for unnecessary travel”.

Mr Morrison said further advice is being taken to the national cabinet next Tuesday night and will be available before people go on school holidays.

“I am just flagging that for next week, when we consider those issues on a broader scale,” he said.

So we have plenty of warning that we may be largely confined to our homes, possibly in the near future.

Most people I have talked to at work this week have been preparing for working from home.

I have been able to work from home for years so don’t need to do much more, but I guess need to mentally prepare for a major change in work and lifestyle.

It is being made clear that we all need to prepare for the possibility, if not likelihood, that we will be confined to home some time soon, and potentially for an extended period of time.


Jacinda Ardern is on Seven Sharp tonight to ‘answer questions’.

She has reiterated:

  • Prepare to work from home.
  • Prepare to not travel.

 

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26 Comments

  1. Kitty Catkin

     /  20th March 2020

    I can’t see how busdrivers, shop workers, dustmen,, police and roadworkers can work from home.

    Given that we know that the people with have brought it in and are in isolation, not even ill enough to be in hospital, this seems a gross over-reaction.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  20th March 2020

      The government has to be seen to be doing something, but they will wreck the economy at this rate. They are ignoring the WHO stats of the people who would be likely to die (old and frail, immune-compromised, people with existing conditions) and the % of people who would die (now a fraction of what was believed to be the case) Deaths among younger people in good general health are not happening. To shut down everyone is insanity. Isolate the ones who’d be in danger if it did strike here and don’t let the country go bankrupt because of fearmongering.

      Reply
    • Ray

       /  20th March 2020

      I agree that it might be an overreaction but sooner or later it will arrive and then we all will have to make major changes in our life styles.
      And for we all we know it is already in our communities, thanks to people just walking through customs with no verbal warning till yesterday, so let’s get organised.
      I suggested on no hand shaking at Rotary two weeks ago, one or two insisted on walking around the group doing just that.
      Absolutely no sign of that last night!

      Reply
    • Whatever anyone thinks of what is an appropriate reaction or not, the clear signs are that we need to prepare for the possibility (probably likelihood) that we have to stay at home except for emergencies.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  20th March 2020

        That ‘probably’ won’t be till there is something like 20 deaths. If we do it too early than isolation fatigue kicks in and if no one is looking will break the rules . It may be better to restrict it to virus hotspots or particular groups most vulnerable.

        In an ideal world every pandemic or epidemic is treated equally when the death roll rises but a form of mass hysteria has taken over that means this one is different until a treatment works and a vaccine is released
        ..I have vague notions of the polio epidemic of the late 50s??
        “New Zealand experienced polio epidemics in 1916, 1925, 1927, 1937, 1948–49, 1952–53 and 1955–56.” When case fatality rates apparently we’re similar or greater than CV-19, 2% -10%.
        There was a vaccine by the late 50s…the current epidemic has no vaccine or validated drug treatment
        https://teara.govt.nz/en/epidemics/page-5

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  20th March 2020

          Prepare for the possibilty, but don’t do it when there’s no need.

          WHO has revised the % of those who’ve died OF it rather than WITH it. It now seems more like the flu death rate, and we don’t have the mass hysteria over that although it kills 500 each year in NZ. The young and healthy seem not to be in much danger of the Covid virus, and there’s no point in isolating those in no danger; concentrate on those who would be.

          Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  20th March 2020

    Surely even Lefties need the excuse of uncontrolled community transmission to impose this economy and job killer?

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  20th March 2020

      I’d hate to think that it was deliberate, but the result will be the same. The revised figures (like the number now known to have died with it rather than of it) are not publicised to the same extent. It seems that the 3.4% death rate was highly exaggerated, but the news doesn’t seem to be reporting this. Almost all the deaths were people who were ill anyway. Take the same care as one would for any infectious illness, but keep it in proportion !!!

      Reply
    • Blazer

       /  20th March 2020

      tragic Al….economy more important than peoples health….hopeless!!

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  20th March 2020

        You obviously haven’t noticed health depends on the economy – but you may sooner rather than later.

        Reply
        • And you obviously haven’t noticed that an economy depends on a healthy population – but you may come to sooner rather than later.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  21st March 2020

            Of course I have as have all businesses. Both are important and you can’t wreck one without wrecking the other which was exactly my point.

            Reply
  3. I’ve just been talking too someone involved in health in Aus. Lockdown looks inevitable, as does widespread infection over years. Health systems can barely cope with normal workloads and Covid will tip it over capacity, it’s just a matter of how much.

    And it’s not just a matter of getting more ventilators, operating them requires experienced nurses and it’s not easy to quickly train them, especially when those who are experienced are busy saving lives.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  20th March 2020

      Surely effective drug therapies and earlier interventions with better testing will drastically reduce the need for ventilators.

      Reply
      • Developing proven alternatives will take time, possibly quite a bit of time. It’s all new territory. And any new drugs or therapies require experienced administration and monitoring. Our health system has very little extra capacity, especially for new treatments for new illnesses.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  20th March 2020

          That answer reeks of bureaucracy. Uunleash the private sector and replace can’t do with can do.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  21st March 2020

            ‘ Uunleash the private sector ‘!!!…pure comedy gold as the private sector unleashes carnage on the economy from the created trillions and low interest rate regime to bail out their incompetence.

            Boeing cap in hand to the Govt for a 50 billion lifeline after spending 45 billion buying back their OWN shares!!!!

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st March 2020

              B is still blissfully unaware his entire lifestyle depends on the private sector he hates.

              Actually he is far from blissful – sadly, permanently tormented by his imaginary demons rather.

            • Blazer

               /  21st March 2020

              Al, blissfully unaware of how a handful of people manipulate economies ,by misallocation of finance ,created on a whim and designed to maintain the modern feudal system.

              Heads we win ,tails you lose…socialise losses and privatise..profits…pre GFC in 2006 20 people at Goldman Sachs were paid more than 20 million a year……nothing to reflect on at…all!

            • Blazer

               /  21st March 2020

              correction=100 people were paid more than 20 million that year…Al would say..they ‘earned it!

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  21st March 2020

              Ah, B’s “wicked banker” fetish rides again.

  4. Maggy Wassilieff

     /  21st March 2020

    Watching TV One news last night and you’d think that we were all middle-class technophiles.

    Few tradespeople, hospitality workers, cleaners, primary productiion workers, etc are going to be able to work from home.
    Their work will grind to a halt.

    None of us are going to be happy little campers at home if the internet goes down and electricity is turned off.
    Stock up on good books and whittling wood.

    Reply
  5. New York next:

    Reply

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