Covid-19: 4 level alert system with guidance on current level 2

  • Four stage Alert System for COVID-19 announced
  • New Zealand moved up to COVID-19 Alert Level 2 – Reduce Contact
  • New Zealanders over 70 and those with certain medical conditions told to stay at home as much as they can to reduce risk of contact with the virus
  • Workplaces to implement plans to reduce person-to-person contact, including work from home where possible
  • Limit all non-essential domestic travel

New Zealand has been moved up to COVID-19 Alert Level 2, Reduce Contact, in an escalation of efforts to reduce the spread of the virus in New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today.

“Protecting New Zealanders from the virus is our number one objective, and we must take decisive action to prevent the worst occurring here,” Jacinda Ardern said.

“New Zealand is fighting an unprecedented global pandemic. We must fight by going hard and going early with new measures to slow the transmission of the virus.

“Today I am announcing a four stage COVID-19 Alert Level system, with escalating restrictions on human contact, travel and business operations.

“The international situation is changing rapidly and we need to clearly sign-post the changes New Zealanders will be asked to make as we step up our efforts to limit the spread of the virus. The alert system means people can see and plan for the kinds of restrictions we may be required to put in place, which may be required rapidly.

“Based on expert medical advice and international evidence I am moving New Zealand to Alert Level 2, Reduce Contact. This will have a significant disruption on how we go about our daily lives, but it is necessary to protect lives.

“People over 70 years of age, or people who are immunocompromised or have certain pre-existing conditions, need to stay at home as much as they can from now on.

“I’m asking everyone to support our older New Zealanders by doing things like keeping in contact with them and dropping off food or other supplies.

“I am also asking businesses and workplaces to play their part. Many workplaces already have plans for staff to work from home or to distance themselves in the workplace. We are now asking you to put those plans in place.

“Health and emergency professionals, transport and delivery staff, supermarket and food production workers, and other essential people will be continuing on at their place of work at this alert level.

“It’s also important to note that at every alert level supermarkets around New Zealand will remain open.

“We are also asking New Zealanders to limit all non-essential domestic travel. We need people to significantly reduce the number of interactions they have at this time and that includes visiting people in different parts of the country for non-essential reasons.

“These measures are being taken in the national interest. We know people, business, and sports events will be impacted, but these are short-term disruptions for the overall health of our people and country.

“I know many New Zealanders are anxious. The alert system is designed to offer certainty around future action and the ability for people to plan and prepare for any future eventuality. Please be strong, be kind, and unite against COVID-19,” Jacinda Ardern said.


COVID-19 alert levels [PDF, 50 KB]

Arden has just said ‘this won’t be for just weeks, this will be with us for some time’.

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28 Comments

  1. Jacinda Ardern is due to have a media conference at 12:30 pm

    Reply
  2. Kitty Catkin

     /  21st March 2020

    Yes, I see people being kind and dropping off groceries etc…I DON’T think.

    This alarmism is insane in light of the new statistics about the virus which show that it’s nowhere near as dangerous as it was made out to be.

    Reply
    • Our government is dealing with a serious situation and have huge responsibilities. They are acting on best advice and best judgement. This is a crisis no matter how you look at it and it will be something we need to deal with for months and probably more.

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  21st March 2020

      Your outlook is different than those who are saying we should have closed the borders months ago and the pubic health professor who just said the new moves don’t go far enough. I guess that shows how getting everyone on the same page is not easy.

      If you’re referring to Ardern’s address as insane alarmism’ that view itself is a different disparagement than some others about it:

      “I had to turn the TV off. I hate being spoken to in such a patronising manner. I will get the brief version of what she said later. For someone with a communications degree she sure doesn’t know how to speak to people.”

      “What a condescending talk that was. I’m not a bloody toddler.”

      “Ardern is a complete idiot.”

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  21st March 2020

        In view of the numbers here and WHO’s revised figures about the death rate, the reaction is the old sledgehammer and nut one. One person in 125,000 has had it, none were seriously ill, no deaths have occurred and we have no community spread. Yet the hysteria continues as if it was everywhere and an automatic death sentence,

        If she thinks that people are suddenly going to go all caring and look after people who live alone, she’s dreaming. They don’t now. Why will they start to do this ?

        I didn’t hear the latest address; the news is now nothing but the virus, which is instrumental in scaremongering.

        Reply
    • Patricia

       /  21st March 2020

      “Yes, I see people being kind and dropping off groceries etc…I DON’T think.”

      I don’t know what world you live in Kitty, but we have offered to help three separate old folks in our street to get their groceries or anything else they need. Husband is off to do a shop for one of them now. They were so happy and relieved to know they had been thought of and that they’re not alone. We won’t be the only ones doing this – it’s what people do.

      Reply
      • Chris

         /  21st March 2020

        Great Patricia. I thought Kitty’s comment was very cynical. Good on you and Pete George for caring about others in a useful and positive way.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  21st March 2020

          One detective had dealt with four cases in six months of people being found dead weeks after they died. That was in one area, how many are there nationwide ? People who are so isolated that no one bothers to wonder why the letterbox is overflowing and the grass is knee-high are lying dead inside their houses until the smell reaches the street.

          Cynical ? I don’t think so. Realistic, more like.

          Reply
      • Conspiratoor

         /  21st March 2020

        Well done Patricia and well said Chris. Times like this bring out the best in most people but unfortunately the worst in some. This is a scary time for the very old, especially those like my dear old mum who has been quarantined in her apartment and are relying on the good will of family and folks with compassion

        Reply
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  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  21st March 2020

    This is a good sign they’re working with businesses to make things as workable as possible. A tick for this:
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=12318724

    Be a good idea to get your required details printed so you can just hand them out.

    Reply
  6. Corky

     /  21st March 2020

    Yesterday I was talking to a relly. We wondered how long it would be before Tuhoe cut off access to their territory. Well, Tuhoe have been beaten to the mark by another iwi. This has the potential to turn ugly very fast.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12318689

    On ‘ no panic buying.’ Maybe those not prepared should panic buy? Continuous food supply demands a continuous human input. Businesses cannot produce if people walk off the job; inexperienced new staff stuff up production lines and quality control etc. What about overseas material we use in manufacturing? We can’t expect an unbroken supply chain.

    Farmers are about to be hit hard with rustling. The penny hasn’t dropped with criminals yet. When it does, the way they operate will also have to change.

    How long before we have to start printing money?

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  22nd March 2020

      I see Italy is closing supermarkets to give workers at rest. Funny that, I mentioned it yesterday.

      I see Maori have just received a lush financial packet to help fight Coronavirus. Millions of dollars other people won’t receive. Somebody tell me this isn’t an apartheid country.

      I was behind a bro in the supermarket who told the person in front of him he was stocking up. His trolley was like mount Everest. Yep – 4 sponges, 2 trays of sausage rolls, top shelf soft drinks. 4 trays of high sugar yogurt. I stopped looking at that stage. The total was $430.72.

      I thought…this is a rich bro dressed rough. Then he handed over a Winz chit and the familiar faded blue card. I hope he was grateful to taxpayers…as should all beneficiaries and superannuates.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  22nd March 2020

        The WINZ food grants are for essential items only and things like soft drinks are not allowed to be bought with them. There is a list of what they can and can’t be used for and the checkout operator would know that soft drinks are on the list of things that are not considered to be essential. How many times a week do you go to the supermarket ???

        Reply
        • Corky

           /  22nd March 2020

          Don’t tell me what I didn’t see. I saw the chit and the card. Essentials it would seem are out the window. That’s the reason I mentioned it. The supervisor came over after
          being signalled by the checkout operator. The supervisor said to the operator these EXACT words: ‘I just need the paper.’

          I have stated before how many times a go to the supermarket and why.

          Anyway..anything to offer your fellow man to help them through this crisis. Perhaps how to mow the lawns when petrol supplies are disrupted?

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  22nd March 2020

            You didn’t see a paper; they use cards now. So the supervisor couldn’t have said that. The essentials only criterion hasn’t changed.Why would it ?

            If there’s no petrol, what would I mow the person’s lawn with ? Shears ? Why would I mow a young, fit person’s lawn, anyway ? They should be helping me with mine, as I have a large sloping verge, not the other way around. I believe that WINZ pays for lawnmowing for people on Super or who have disabilities and can’t DIY.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  22nd March 2020

              They not only do that, they cover the costs of gardening and window cleaning.

          • Corky

             /  22nd March 2020

            ”You didn’t see a paper; they use cards now. So the supervisor couldn’t have said that. The essentials only criterion hasn’t changed.Why would it.”

            Stop insinuating. Are you calling me a liar?

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  22nd March 2020

              Well, you do seem to fantasise, to put it mildly.

              You have told a number of lies about me; remember my feral Maori neighbours across the road, never mentioned by me here, who were actually Pakeha and a ‘professional couple’ ? That was only one of them. So was the claim that I am housebound; I am not. And so on…

  7. artcroft

     /  21st March 2020

    From the WPO.
    “For Hayden Peeler, a 28-year-old mother of two, the prospect of getting coronavirus is the least of her concerns.”

    Its going to be like that for most people. Corona virus will be a big nothing, slightly sick at most. Now explain to them why they have to be poor and unemployed, living precariously for months on end. Go on Jacinda tell us why?

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  22nd March 2020

      because the C19 virus masks the fact that the financial system based on endless Q.E and low interest ratres designed to enrich a few at the expense of many,was already…collapsing.

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  22nd March 2020

      The actual illness won’t directly affect most people by lying them low. Why do they have to be poor and unemployed, living precariously for months on end?

      Maybe those hit should just stay at home laid low, or in hospitals or in morgues and let the rest of the world just carry on. (Italy announced 793 more deaths on Saturday, the second day in a row of the biggest day-to-day increase in the country’s four-week epidemic, after surpassing China’s death toll on Thursday.)

      Exactly what should Jacinda Ardern tell us?

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  22nd March 2020

        Italy’s average age is among the world’s highest (more than 20 years higher than China’s) and, as has been said here, the people who’ve died were aged 80+ on average, 50% had three at least existing conditions, only .8% had no known ones, the rest had one or two, It seems that many of these people would have died of what was wrong with them anyway at that age. Italy is atypical and should not be used as an example for scaremongering.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  22nd March 2020

          Don’t disagree. I used that as an example of different regimes doing things differently or at different times.

          Corona virus will be a nothing to most people. If no precautions or ineffective ones are introduced it will be nothing to a lot less people. If precautions are taken people are going to be disadvantaged. That could mean unemployment. Does Ardern have to tell us why that would be?

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  22nd March 2020

            I agree with taking precautions in epidemics, but not shutting every public place in the country and risking the entire economy by sending businesses bankrupt. Handwashing and sanitiser and known to be effective against the spread. Keep the old and frail safe. Don’t assume that everyone has it and that it’s a death sentence.

            Reply
  8. lurcher1948

     /  22nd March 2020

    To all the PM Jacinda Ardern haters, kiwi blogs patron David Farrar is truly winding up his feral followers,here and there and nearby,his income rapidly raising supported by the national party….Communist Chinese donation money being put to foul use…the cry has gone out,GO AWAY from more testing,TO raise it to level 4, thank god racist nutter righties are not running the country…you rock Jacinda… national a dismal 2nd

    Reply

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