Day 2 of isolation – time to ponder our way of living

So far for me isolation at home is easy. I have very good company, and I have spent all days this week working from home anyway, so yesterday was much the same.

I’m enjoying working from home, but after a busy start to the week as clients were busy setting themselves up to work from home and rushing to get payrolls done before closing offices, it was noticeably quieter yesterday. I have other work I can do, but I don’t know if it will last four weeks.

Some messages from NZ First MPs.

A reversal:

Guardian environment editor – Coronavirus: ‘Nature is sending us a message’, says UN environment chief

Nature is sending us a message with the coronavirus pandemic and the ongoing climate crisis, according to the UN’s environment chief, Inger Andersen.

Andersen said humanity was placing too many pressures on the natural world with damaging consequences, and warned that failing to take care of the planet meant not taking care of ourselves.

Leading scientists also said the Covid-19 outbreak was a “clear warning shot”, given that far more deadly diseases existed in wildlife, and that today’s civilisation was “playing with fire”. They said it was almost always human behaviour that caused diseases to spill over into humans.

To prevent further outbreaks, the experts said, both global heating and the destruction of the natural world for farming, mining and housing have to end, as both drive wildlife into contact with people.

I’ve heard others make links between the virus and climate change and the environment and I think it is dubious at best.

Sure if the human population was a tenth what it is and no one travelled apart from walking then viruses and other contagious diseases would spread less quickly and less far, but I don’t think modern humans are any more responsible for naural mutations than past civilisations.

Aaron Bernstein, at the Harvard School of Public Health in the US, said the destruction of natural places drives wildlife to live close to people and that climate change was also forcing animals to move: “That creates an opportunity for pathogens to get into new hosts.”

“We’ve had Sars, Mers, Covid-19, HIV. We need to see what nature is trying to tell us here. We need to recognise that we’re playing with fire,” he said.

“The separation of health and environmental policy is a ​dangerous delusion. Our health entirely depends on the climate and the other organisms we share the planet with.”

Maybe, but 7.8 billion people need somewhere to live and need food to survive.

The Covid-19 crisis may provide an opportunity for change, but Cunningham is not convinced it will be taken: “I thought things would have changed after Sars, which was a massive wake up call – the biggest economic impact of any emerging disease to that date,” he said.

What sort of change? Reversing population growth?

Here from Newsroom: Covid-19 may be just what climate change needs

Big jolts wake us up and force us to act today. Gina Williams looks at how the Covid-19 pandemic might give us the chance to redesign our society to combat climate change.

Things like no cars, no meat, no international travel, no business or commercialism?

Right now use of cars is limited of course, but they help us keep in our bubbles going to supermarkets to get food. If everyone had to walk to a local dairy for provisions it would be much harder to lock down the virus.

Nature has always had ways of checking and limiting and reducing species of plants and animals that grow too prolifically.

Should we just let Covid-19 to knock the population  back? That would be getting back to nature, letting nature take it’s course.

There’s been a bit of idealist opportunism alongside the rapid sweep of Covid-19. Now is not a good time to make maajor knee jerk changes. We are in survival mode. lets get through the next year and then see what we should be doing differently.


But maybe with most of us confined to our homes with a lot less to do this could be a good time to contemplate the situation we and our society become, and to consider better ways of living.

There already seems to have been renewed interest in growing more food at home and cooking and baking from raw ingredients rather than relying on fast food and packets.

We will also have to work harder on relationships. Many of us will be spending a lot more time with a few people close to us for longer than usual.

There could be an opportunity for online nutrition advice and relationship counselling – but perhaps we should be working things out for ourselves more rather than relying on paid for quick fixes that often don’t work for long or at all.

 

Leave a comment

45 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  27th March 2020

    Some people with time on their hands writing crap. Humanity has suffered plagues since written records exist. Nothing to do with either climate change or environment or over-population.

    Over-zealous enforcement based on fear and panic could lead either to rebellion or dumbed-down submissiveness. The latter is what I fear most.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  27th March 2020

      the system has always been predicated on the latter.

      You should be used to it by now.

      Reply
    • Ray

       /  27th March 2020

      Tell that to Isaac Newton, he discovered and refined calculus and the theory of gravity while avoiding the plague.

      Reply
  2. David

     /  27th March 2020

    Because we are being forced apart people may end up more self reliant and insular and putting their own needs first. There will clearly be a spike in divorces and violence which will leave many permanently scarred particularly children. A few will lose everything, some will face unemployment and will struggle to ever find a job again (anyone over 55) so family will have to face losing loved ones to suicide.
    There is definitely some very grumpy and intolerant and anxious feelings around which we didnt have in the aftermath of the quake when people came together to share and help.
    There will definitely be some inter generational resentment towards the boomers as the young will foot the bill to prevent the deaths of very old and unwell people, many of those dont want the economy shut down which is hurting their kids and grandkids and would rather take care of themselves without all the fuss.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  27th March 2020

      well if you go broke David at least you’ll still get admiring glances when you go for a…drive.

      Reply
      • David

         /  27th March 2020

        I will be fine thanks Blazer. Bit upsetting watching whats happening with our staff in the tourism business which is stuffed for at least 12 months. Our Filipino workers while fine themselves are limited in how much money they can send home to their families.
        Havent heard from the property manager yet so presume all is well at this stage but no doubt will have to help there too. All our tradies are at home which will be rough as they are all self employed.
        The cost will be huge for Ardern not shutting the border early enough or doing it properly and then imposing the worlds most brutal lockdown and for a month as well. At least let the construction industry back to work with appropriate guidelines, maybe they should donate to the NZ First Foundation and get a horse racing type exemption.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  27th March 2020

          So we officially have a police state where they can make any rules they like with the threat of locking anyone objecting up for obstruction. Our supine media tells us:

          And if you are not sure who to listen to on this, the Police Commissioner is probably a better person than the PM. The Police have been empowered through Parliament to be operationally in charge of the matter. And in the cops’ defence, telling people to remain at home unless they have a good reason not to be is definitely the best way to handle it.
          https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120591047/coronavirus-government-needs-to-get-its-bubble-selfisolated

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  27th March 2020

            About 500,000 of us live alone in NZ, whether from choice or circumstances.

            The effect of isolation on this number of people will be catastrophic.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  27th March 2020

              I can guess who the meanspirited PDTs are.

  3. lurcher1948

     /  27th March 2020

    At home but at 12 pm noon took the dogs down to Waihinahina dog park by car (3 minutes from home) an old tip site, HUGE,JESS suffers more from cabin fever being a heading dog needs some serious zoomies with RED. Only 3 bubbles walking 100s of feet apart walked the dogs and went home back to self isolation….Stay safe and healthy and keep posting folks

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  27th March 2020

      Gemma and I did our usual morning walk on the piece of deserted track at Orongo Bay. Like yours she needs off leash running being part collie. Very quiet and partly foggy with little traffic. Waiting to warm up a bit before doing some serious gardening. Luckily our mower man turned up on Tuesday otherwise I’d be having to dust off my old Flymo and have a go at the top lawns at least.

      Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  27th March 2020

      Lurch, I have been writing a story based on your dogs….would you like me to send it to you?

      Love to RED, JESS and TALLULAH from my wee man.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  27th March 2020

      RED is not real. You told me that before. Have you got your scripts mixed up?

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  27th March 2020

        Who said that RED is not real ? Nonsense. We have seen photos of him.

        Reply
    • David

       /  27th March 2020

      About to take the dog to the mother in laws for a sleepover, keep her spirits up. Not sure what plod think but its so hard to get any clarity.

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  27th March 2020

        Enid Blyton would be very surprised to know that Mr Plod the Noddy books policeman had had his name become a generic one for the rozzers/Old Bill/peelers/bobbies/coppers/boys in blue. No one seems to know where Old Bill or ‘the Bill’ came from.

        Rude(ish) police joke.

        Two prostitutes were talking, and one asked the other if she’d ever been picked up by the fuzz.

        ‘No, but I’ve been swung round by the tits a few times.’

        Reply
      • Some things around this are quite vague. They had another go at explaining at today’s briefing but weren’t explicit and said common sense was needed. They reiterated ‘stay local’ and don’t drive distances for a walk or to the beach, but said riding a bike was fine and would cover larger distances.

        The kep concern seems to be ‘what if you had an accident and needed help?’ – you could as easily fall outside your home as across town at the beach, but they don’t want people driving all over the place when it’s not necessary.

        From RNZ Live:

        Official advice, stay local – but don’t put yourself in a position that would require others to come and rescue you if you got into trouble. Stuart-Black says people need to use their judgement and make sure they are doing activities that wouldn’t require them to be saved or interacted with.

        They say don’t go to to town.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  27th March 2020

          Life is about managing risks properly rather than vainly staying in bed to avoid every conceivable risk.

          It’s quite apparent that our bureaucracy will push constraints to the limit that the population will tolerate. I only hope there is a limit.

          Reply
          • Kitty Catkin

             /  27th March 2020

            From the little I have heard, there is a limit. The government will try to extend the lockdown at its own peril. People will only be tolerant up to a point.

            Reply
  4. Patzcuaro

     /  27th March 2020

    Don’t know if this has been posted

    Reply
  5. Corky

     /  27th March 2020

    Fear certainly shows up peoples true colours. The other day I pulled up outside my health shop to conclude business with the owners. A line had already formed. As I exited my car I noticed a woman at the end of the line in a vibrant mood chatting to the person in front of her. When she saw me coming to join the line her mood changed abruptly. Even though I kept my distance she moved to the side of the line while trying to keep her place. She kept looking over her shoulder and started rubbing her face and hands with what I assume was sanitiser. By this time another person had joined the line behind me. He tapped my shoulder and shook his head as her disdain for me continued. No doubt her foul mood was helped when the owner called me into the shop before the 10 people waiting to enter. This shop sold 400 500 ml bottles of CS leading up to close down.

    Conversely, I arrived at my bank past opening time to find it locked. Two tellers are at the counter. A young European guy is trying to get in. The staff just look at him and refuse to acknowledge him. He throws his hands in the air, gets into his mates car and buggers off.
    I move up to the door to try my luck. I’m acknowledged by one teller. The door is opened to allow me access to the ATM.

    PROBABLY two examples of racism and ageism.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  27th March 2020

      ATMs are OUTSIDE banks. There would be little point in having them inside. One doesn’t have to be let in to use them or no one would be able to get at them outside bank hours. The whole idea is to give people access to their accounts 24 hours a day.

      I won’t speculate on why that woman reacted like that when she saw you coming.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  27th March 2020

      I’m afraid your ignorance is to the fore again. Also your hinting that I make stuff up. I can’t help it if I have a life.

      ‘ATMs are OUTSIDE banks.’ Most are, yes. Mine has two, One outside and one in a foyer that also contains a machine for doing self deposits. When the bank is closed the foyer is accessed by your bank card that you swipe to enter.

      ”One doesn’t have to be let in to use them or no one would be able to get at them outside bank hours”

      Tsk Tsk Tsk! 😀

      ”I won’t speculate on why that woman reacted like that when she saw you coming.”

      Maybe you shouldn’t speculate at all. Just a thought

      Reply
      • Kitty Catkin

         /  27th March 2020

        As the card lets people in, they don’t need to be let in by the tellers. Many ATMs have deposit facilities and have done for years. They need to be one’s own bank for this, I believe, although withdrawals can be made from other banks’ ATMs.

        The idea that one person would be refused entry and another not is highly improbable.

        If going to a shop and ATM are ‘having a life’, I pity you..

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  27th March 2020

        ”As the card lets people in, they don’t need to be let in by the tellers.”

        That’s a fair point and down to me not explaining using a better description.

        ”Conversely, I arrived at my bank past opening time to find it locked.”

        I meant not passed closing hours, but passed their usual opening time. (9 AM).

        Obviously the swipe option had been disabled because I saw the young dude try to use it

        ”Many ATMs have deposit facilities and have done for years. They need to be one’s own bank for this, I believe, although withdrawals can be made from other banks’ ATMs.”

        Simply trying to muddy the waters. The other bank I know of that has a similar setup is Westpac. And their machines are in the foyer with swipe access.

        ”The idea that one person would be refused entry and another not is highly improbable.”

        As I have suggested, it’s time you stop speculating.

        ”If going to a shop and ATM are ‘having a life’, I pity you..”

        Don’t. I’m sure if we compared what comes out of the ATM…I would pity you.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  27th March 2020

          Why ? You have no idea how much I have in the bank. But I pity anyone whose idea of life is going to a bank machine and a health food shop.

          Reply
        • Corky

           /  27th March 2020

          Of course I do. You are a widow. You would live paycheck to paycheck, even allowing for a modest life insurance payout.

          ”But I pity anyone whose idea of life is going to a bank machine and a health food shop.”

          Yes, well, even in these times HARD CASH allows me to do things..and buy things your internet banking won’t allow. Er, that’s why I go to the ATM. That way I don’t eat into my reserve. I would agree that going to a bank and ATM isn’t living. But there are
          always lessons and observations I learn from most times doing these activities others don’t do, or who consider them just mundane chores to be done without thought.

          Your internet banking cuts you off from the world, and multiplies your social isolation many times over. But what would I know. So, carry on. Each to their own.

          Reply
            • Conspiratoor

               /  28th March 2020

              Use it before you lose it corky. Dirty cash may not survive Corona.

              Plonk that stack of dollar coins you’ve been hiding under the bed on the counter and you could soon be out of luck. Or you could convert your ed hillarys to greenbacks, they’re made of a blend of fabric and paper that apparently make it hard for the virus to stick to

          • Kitty Catkin

             /  28th March 2020

            Internet banking would only cut someone off from the world & multiply social isolation if their only contact with people was when they went to the bank. Utter nonsense. Why waste time & money paying a bill over the counter when one can do it from a computer or have an automatic payment ? There are more interesting things to do than stand in a bank queue.

            We don’t talk about ‘paychecks’ in NZ, by the way, so no, I don’t exist from paycheck to paycheck. No one in NZ does.

            You have no idea how much is in my bank account or on term deposit, so don’t act as if you have.

            As an ATM isn’t a free money machine, anyone taking money out of one IS using their ‘reserve’.

            Reply
  6. Duker

     /  27th March 2020

    Kiwibank says its closed ALL its branches , so much for being an essential service. The government should step in and say OPEN NOW As mentioned by others they may restrict entry to known customers or for other reasons

    https://www.kiwibank.co.nz/contact-us/support-hub/coronavirus-updates/changes-branch-hours/

    But they do mention that cash can be withdrawn from supermarkets during shopping when using an eftpos card

    Reply
    • I can continue to do all my banking with Kiwibank. I haven’t been in a branch for years.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  27th March 2020

        What happens if the internet goes down?

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  27th March 2020

          you won’t be able to…surf the net.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  27th March 2020

            No shite. Sherlock. 😀

            Reply
          • Duker

             /  27th March 2020

            The internet and the mobile system are under stress…hoefully they sort the hiccups but I remember about 10 years ago when the then Telecom mobile network broke and was down for about a week – its was a failure of some hardware.
            Well be stuffed if that happens now , as a cold start of the entire mobile system can take days

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  27th March 2020

              Don’t scare the horses, Duke. This lot seem to think everything will continue to be Kapai. What about my landline? Tell me it ain’t so!

        • Corky

           /  27th March 2020

          Come to think about it, that would also include ATMs. In that case the government would force banks to open? While many have cash reserves on hand, my guess is the majority don’t.

          Reply
        • People would have to complain in private guess, or by cellphone.

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  27th March 2020

          All food and medicine purchases will stop as they are not taking cash now.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  27th March 2020

            Not so in my area. We are using toke -ins.

            Reply
            • Duke

               /  27th March 2020

              Paid in cash in Pak N Save the other day…. also dairies are still taking cash from personal experience. I did use paywave at Chemist
              Petrol stations are still using night pay windows for cash but the one I use is card at pump

      • Kitty Catkin

         /  27th March 2020

        People who don’t do online banking are going to be hit hard. I can’t even remember when I was last in a branch; I had to go in when my husband died, but that was four years ago.

        Reply

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