Advice from 7 weeks of Covid confinement

This was posted on Facebook a few days ago – these are challenging times but there are or can be positives if you look for them and appreciate them.


To everyone who is feeling the fear – have a read of this. My friend Victoria posted it and I hope it brings you some comfort. This is the stuff we want to see on our newsfeed!♥️ It came from a teacher in China who has been there since the start of the crisis, and is well worth a read:

“It has been a while since my last post when we were in ‘lock-down’ in China and since I’ve had a few emails recently, I think it’s probably time to update everyone.

We are just finishing our 7th week of E-Learning, seven weeks of being mainly housebound and seven weeks of uncertainty. We are healthy, we are happy, and we are humbled.

We are allowed to move around freely now with a green QR code that we show when we get our temperature taken. You get your temperature taken everywhere, and it’s just become part of the routine. Most restaurants and shopping centres are now open, and life is coming back to our city.

As we watch the rest of the world begin their time inside; here are some of my reflections on the last seven weeks:

1. Accept that you have no control over the situation. Let go of any thoughts of trying to plan too much for the next month or two. Things change so fast. Don’t be angry and annoyed at the system. Anxiety goes down, and you make the best of the situation – whatever that might be for you. Accept that this is what it is and things will get easier.

2. Try not to listen to/read/watch too much media. It WILL drive you crazy. There is a thing as too much!

3. The sense of community I have felt during this time is incredible. I could choose who I wanted to spend my energy on – who I wanted to call, message and connect with and found the quality of my relationships has improved.

4. Appreciate this enforced downtime. When do you ever have time like this? I will miss it when we go back to the fast-paced speed of the ‘real world’.

5. Time goes fast. I still haven’t picked up the ukelele I planned to learn, and there are box set TV shows I haven’t yet watched.

6. As a teacher, the relationships I have built with my students have only continued to grow. I have loved seeing how independent they are; filming themselves to respond to tasks while also learning essential life skills such as balance, risk-taking and problem-solving, that even we as adults are still learning.

7. You learn to appreciate the little things; sunshine through the window, flowers blossoming and being able to enjoy a coffee in a cafe.

To those just beginning this journey, You will get through it. Listen to what you are told, follow the rules and look out for each other. There is light at the end of the tunnel. 🙏🏼

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33 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  29th March 2020

    Seen on Al Jazeera

    Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  29th March 2020

    Far too passive for my taste. Not made to be a prisoner.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th March 2020

      Nor am I. It’s appalling; the days seem endless.

      This person’s Pollyanna attitude is actually quite annoying. I see nothing positive about total isolation, especially for the very old who are still living in their own homes and who will be unable to even have a new library book in this time, let alone any visitors.The toll on mental health will be immense.

      Reply
  3. After three days of isolation at home I’m actually quite enjoying it. I like working from home. Yesterday I got a good chunk of firewood ready for the winter. And I’ve started to work on projects that I haven’t had time to do.

    As well as that there’s a few things I would like to do that I’ve never had time to do. A heap of things really.

    And I have more time to put into this blog.

    I’m sure after a while I will miss some social interactions, and will miss things like going on beach and bush walks (I’m not pushing the isolation boundaries, I want to protect myself and others as much as possible).

    I don’t want to contribute to South has most cases per head of population

    Today’s rise of 20 new cases in the South comes on a day when 83 new cases were announced across the country.

    But so far this has been an easy exercise, and in some ways better than normal life, more laid back and less hectic.

    Reply
    • Kitty Catkin

       /  29th March 2020

      For you it might be. For the 500,000 who live alone and for whom social contact is now against the law except at second hand, it’s less attractive. For the people whose livelihoods are going down the dunny, it’s a time of appalling stress. I wonder how many suicides will happen as people can’t take the strain.

      People can’t even go to the library, forsooth. Now many won’t even have the newspaper to make a diversion or a magazine to read; the PM could have left people that small oasis of pleasure, but no, it’s not essential. What else will the Dear Leader decide is not essential ?

      Reply
      • I know it’s going to be harder for some people. Quite hard for some – that’s why it’s important for communities to support each other. I wouldn’t like to be living alone going through this.

        But for many people it won’t be too bad, and there will be positives from it, with more home time, more family time, and going back to self entertainment like it used to be.

        Reply
        • Kitty Catkin

           /  29th March 2020

          That sounds terribly smug. ‘Quite hard’ doesn’t even begin to cover it for people living alone, I think, especially old people. How can the community support people when they can’t legally visit them?

          For many people it’s already the opposite of ‘not too bad’.

          Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  29th March 2020

        The authorities seem to be hell- bent on making everyone’s life as miserable as possible and dredging up the most far-fetched claims of risk unchallenged as an excuse.

        Reply
      • Zedd

         /  29th March 2020

        I too live alone kitty.. BUT I still go out walking daily & say “kia ora’ to my neighbours (over the fences).. & of course I still read/comment on YNZ etc. 🙂
        > this is hardly like ‘we are in prison’ (LOCKED down).. Jacinda is doing her best (IMHO) to strike the balance; to try & prevent it become Full-blown ‘Plague’ proportions
        *Id rather her leadership.. than Simon, who is sounding more Trump-esq, by the day; ‘the economy is MORE important’ ?! :/

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  29th March 2020

          Of course the economy is more important otherwise 100% of the population would die instead of 1%. Why do people swallow crap without thinking?

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  29th March 2020

            misery is your raison d’etre,you should be ecstatic Al to have this situation to…spread it.
            You ain’t seen nothing yet as far as the ‘economy’ goes.
            The capitulation of Capitalism as corporations run to the Govt to save them.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  29th March 2020

              The Govt had always had the power to destroy the corporations, B, but they know that doing so would destroy themselves as socialist dictators everywhere have found.

            • Blazer

               /  29th March 2020

              Absolute b/s Al…Many corporations have failed ..and life goes on.
              Business failure used to have consequences,now it is an excuse for a taxpayer bailout.
              Boeing is a perfect example.Has spent around 60 billion in buybacks and dividends to shareholders in recent years…all its cashflow and now asks the Govt for a 60 billion ‘assistance package’.

            • Gezza

               /  29th March 2020

              Multinational Corporations seem to me to be the worst thing about capitalism. It’s too easy for them to destroy other useful capitalist enterprises by putting them out of business.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  29th March 2020

              @G, it’s s lot easier for the govt to do it. Around the world they’ve just put prob millions of SME’s out of business.

            • Gezza

               /  29th March 2020

              Multinational Corporations have done the same thing. That’s how Trump got elected. Telling Americans he’d make US Corporations come back to the US & employ Americans.

          • Zedd

             /  29th March 2020

            ‘Of course the economy is more important otherwise 100% of the population would die instead of 1%’ sez AW

            oh really.. one thing is certain, if this does reach ‘plague proportions’.. whats left of the ‘precious economy’ will be mostly cooped by the selfish, greedy capitalists & the rest of us, will be left to fight over the scraps OR maybe what we can pull out of our gardens

            *time for a rethink.. maybe; ‘Socialism’ ideas, will see us ALL through this :/

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  29th March 2020

              Dunno, Zedd.

              Denmark – Covid-19 measures.

              “We cannot expect the same welfare state on the other side”

            • Gezza

               /  29th March 2020

              Soz. Correction:

              “We cannot expect the same welfare society on the other side” is what their Social Democrat PM says.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  29th March 2020

          Zedd, going for a walk’s all right in good weather, but poor fun when it’s hosing down.

          For those who have limited mobility, it must be hellish being under house arrest, which is what it is.

          Reply
          • I’m sure some will find it difficult.

            But what would be more difficult for someone who lives alone is if the caught Covid-19. Getting care would be difficult (ring the Healthline), and going to the supermarket would be ruled out.

            So prevention, even if it not easy, must be better than the alternative.

            Reply
            • Kitty Catkin

               /  29th March 2020

              How long do you expect people to not mind being confined to the house or the distance they can walk ? How long do you expect people not to mind becoming unemployed ? What if the PM decides to continue this indefinitely, which she has said is a possibilty ?

              Surely there must be an alternative to this.

            • One alternative is to let the virus run through the population unchecked. Another alternative is to take less stringent precautions and allow more transmissions, illnesses and deaths. I think that most people probably aren’t keen on either.

          • Zedd

             /  29th March 2020

            @kitty
            Ive got a trusty rain coat.. keeps me fairly dry in heavy downpours too 🙂
            As PG sez.. I dont think we want covid19, to run unchecked & take down many, many more folks ?!
            Kia Kaha; we are all in this waka; but socially distanced, to avoid it sinking :/

            Reply
      • duperez

         /  29th March 2020

        Get yourself a computer, get on line and get into the world through there. Believe it or not there are worlds to explore. If you are too dependent on others for a lead, or incapable, I will set you some homework.

        Or you can sit there for a couple of weeks dwelling on how everyone’s livelihood is going down the dunny, everyone’s going to be suffering appalling stress and there are going to be thousands of suicides.

        You could even marry the two. There are endless examples of misery and woe to be investigated. Studying those could cheer you up.

        If you want a lead, a study of the work of the music group Church of the Cosmic Skull would be a good start. Their 2019 album ‘Everybody’s Going to Die’ should provide enough material for a good essay.

        Personally I think there is more material and scope in a paper on Leonard Cohen. You even get the mournful.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  29th March 2020

          Hell no, dups. I spent two years in a Canadian lab with a Leonard Cohen addict. It was like suicide watch every day.

          Reply
          • duperez

             /  29th March 2020

            There’s one of life’s coincidences! I’ve just come here from looking at livecam of where our off-spring is in Canada and a not-long posted video of her boss talking about how their company is handling things.

            Maybe her not working in the lab (where she could be) is a blessing! (Alberta)

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  29th March 2020

              Just recently heard that my old Cohen lab mate died in Blenheim in January and my then Prof’s wife also just died in Victoria, B.C. It does feel like a lifetime ago. My then wife also died 6 years ago so I strangely feel I am living a second life now.

            • duperez

               /  29th March 2020

              Been to Victoria online recently and seen Parliament Buildings through a different lens. And the Fairmont Hotel under construction! I reckon spending 8 minutes 20 of the confinement looking at this is worthwhile.

        • Kitty Catkin

           /  29th March 2020

          Odd as it might seem, Duperez, I do have a computer.

          Your sneering won’t do anything to alleviate the consequences of the lockdown.

          Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  29th March 2020

    Yesterday I made the unpleasant discovery that our mower man had been interrupted by rain on Wednesday and had only mowed the top couple of lawn areas. That left three down the hill from the guest house and two below ours and a small piece where the dogs can run above. Worse, because he hadn’t been back since the drought ended there were clumps foot long in some areas.

    So I dug out my old Flymo which hadn’t seen grass for nearly two decades and sure enough the blade was rusty and the motor seized. I pulled it to bits and cleaned it up and copious amounts of CRC later it was freed up and even ran. That left me to rediscover why I pay someone else to do the lawns. Four lawns later dripping wet with sweat I collapsed into a bath and wasn’t interested in anything but a beer and dinner. Luckily my wife volunteered for the evening dog walk. And so ended the third day.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  29th March 2020

      Finished the last two lawns today and still in a pool of sweat. Wife said she wouldn’t sleep with me unless I had another bath but was going to anyway. Packed the mower away and hope it stays there.

      Reply
  5. Pink David

     /  29th March 2020

    “You will get through it. Listen to what you are told, follow the rules and look out for each other. ”

    Confinement is liberty!

    Reply

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