‘Ethical leadership’ of Ardern praised – is it world changing?

There seems to have been a few people with time on their hands under lockdown putting time into praising the leadership of Jacinda Ardern. Here’s another from Lola Toppin-Casserly (Newsroom): Is Ardern going to change the world?

Jacinda Ardern seems to be nailing it.

She is receiving international attention for “a triumph of science and leadership” through the Covid-19 crisis. She has made difficult decisions to prioritise saving lives over prioritising the economy (rightly so, says The Economist magazine).

Her approach has resulted in New Zealand being one of few countries with a low death rate from Covid-19, and a chance at elimination. Compared with the results of other leaders’ efforts globally, her approach is clearly successful.

“One of few countries with a low death rate” is a highly debatable claim, and in any case is too soon to call the New Zealand approach an outstanding success. Australia (under Scott Morrison’s leadership) is getting similar results with Covid but with lighter restrictions on business.

This is not the first time either. She made headlines with her empathetic response to the Christchurch mosque attacks. She is an inspiration and a hope to many of us.

That’s obvious, glowing praise is being lavished from a number of directions.

For a long time, we have had a global leadership crisis and a prevailing view that our leaders are inadequate and failing. We have unethical scandals in our organisations made public frequently and we have a plethora of narcissistic and incompetent leaders, often men, to refer to, according to organisational psychologist Professor Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic.

Coupled with Ardern’s extraordinary empathy, emotional intelligence and ability to integrate and embody these talents through honed communication skills, she has demonstrated a values-centred approach.

To an extent, yes, but she isn’t the Government on her own, and the values of some around her are more questionable. The Winston based approach of her deputy Prime Minister contrasts with Ardern, and Minister of Health David Clark has been an embarrassment to Ardern’s empathy and values.

There are different ways we might categorise her leadership through the Covid-19 crisis. She has been hailed for providing a masterclass in crisis leadership. Alternatively, resonant and primal leadership would align with her emotional intelligence and self-awareness, directives to be kind and compassionate, and motivating and collaborative approaches. Authentic leadership has received much airtime in recent years and holds that self-awareness, openness, transparency and consistency are at its core.

In the case of Covid-19, Ardern has demonstrated much of this, but more importantly her communication has explicitly prioritised saving lives over the economy.

But Ardern has tried to straddle both, claiming her stringent health priorities will be better for the economy in the medium term (we are yet to see evidence of this).

Other countries have taken a different approach, including Italy, where a recent analysis of the country’s high infection and death rates concluded they were due to an approach based on early advice to keep people and economic activity moving instead of lockdown.

Pretty much every country has grappled with trying to get a balance between health, social and economic impacts.

We might interpret Ardern’s focus on saving lives as putting ethics at the core of New Zealand’s approach to Covid-19.

We?

There is a significant body of academic work on ethical leadership, but there is still debate on what exactly it is and the best approach to thinking about it.

There will always be debate about things like ethical leadership.

A general consensus is that leaders who are honest, caring, principled and make fair and balanced decisions communicate with their followers about ethics and ‘walk the talk’ on ethical conduct.

Most New Zealand leaders could make claims to making “honest, caring, principled and make fair and balanced decisions”, with some justification.  Honesty is probably the trickiest of these to live up to, especially when associated with openness and transparency, and Ardern is flawed in this respect like the rest of them, to a degree at least.

Awareness, care and concern for others, prioritising others’ needs over self-interest, and considering the ethical consequences of decisions also make up ethical leadership. We might say this is just good leadership in general.

But the absence of it in society in current times is why it is worth focusing more specifically on the ethics required of leadership.

There isn’t an absence of it in our society. Ardern may have more successfully promoted it, but she hasn’t suddenly invented it.

Despite debate on the merits of different models of ethical leadership, if we could see more of these items in our leaders’ practices the world would be a far better place.

It is not difficult to see examples around us of where more ethical leadership would create the changes the world needs. Ardern therefore prompts a critical question for us: why are we not seeing more leaders like her?

Every leader is different, in style and substance. Ardern has certainly been noticeably better at some things, but it’s arguable whether New Zealand has done better than many other countries in dealing with Covid-19, and it’s certainly arguable about how well Ardern’s government has performed overall. It has dragged the chain on a number of important social issues like homelessness, poverty and mental health.

The interesting thing about Ardern is she seems to provide us with a role model for a new type of leader, arguably an ethical leader. This is why she gives us hope.

According to theory, we may now start to see ethical followers. And if we have more ethical leaders and followers emerging in our world, we may start to see some of the change we need.

So is Ardern going to change the world? I do hope so.

Ardern and her style of leadership has certainly made an impact, and she needs to be applauded for some things she has achieved. She could end up making quite a positive impact on the country and to a lesser extent the world.

But her ‘ethical leadership’ is hardly an immaculate conception.

I think that some adulators may be confusing Ardern’s actions and speech matching their ideals (selectively) with it being the best and only way to lead.

Lola Toppin-Casserly is a PhD candidate in the School of Government at Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington.

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63 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  1st May 2020

    Isnt it better to have a nations leader getting world wide media attention thats positive rather than a leader who has has to pay to appear on US TV ( and paid the wrong people as hes the butt of jokes on others).
    It was almost cringe worthy how at these global talk fests the kiwi media were pumped to report Keys lame attempts to have face time with major world leaders with his ‘pull aside’
    2 min meetings
    .Meanwhile Ardern gets invited in straight to the Top Table.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3036618/Shortened-Obama-trip-cuts-chances-of-Key-meeting
    Sure one newspaper called him a ‘ economic rock star’ and we never heard the end of it. He seems to be back on the political stage here in NZ … dropping comments everywhere including how hes doning a property flip in Sydney ( how outstanding is that!)

    Reply
    • Kimbo

       /  1st May 2020

      Wow, is Key Derangement Syndrome STILL a thing?! Then again Helen Clark still has her detractors, especially when she publicly opines about ships and shoes…

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  1st May 2020

        Hes back on the stage again Kimbo …along with all his baggage and I dont think we will be seeing less of him ‘this election year’ as it seems hes the one pumping his own tires

        Anyway why not compare the different leaders and the reaction on the world stage.
        One was an L&P leader , the other is genuinely widely acclaimed.
        And is Helen Clarks public role on global issues better news than an apartment flipper

        Reply
        • Kimbo

           /  1st May 2020

          So, yes, KDC is alive and well. Buttressed by a good old dose of tribal “whataboutism”.

          And as per the Rorschach Test analogy I gave below you remind me of the patient who, on asking his reaction to different ink blots Immediately responds, “sex!” every time. On being informed he has a sex addiction, the patient objected, “its not my fault, you’re the ones showing me all the dirty pictures!”

          Reply
  2. Kimbo

     /  1st May 2020

    Like Trump, Ardern’s diametrically opposite image is a political Rorschach Test saying more about the views and values of those who applaud or criticise them. I’ll leave assessment of their actual decisions to the post mortems that lie in the months and years ahead.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  1st May 2020

      Good approach. Leaders’ overall impacts are often best appreciated & most clearly evident looked back from a distance in time.

      But that’s not to say that contemporary analysis isn’t worth anything. Polls for example seem to me to be often quite important in the decisions & actions they take following clear shifts or trends.

      Reply
    • Duker

       /  1st May 2020

      Trump isnt a leader… any more than TV host Bradley Walsh is a leader.
      he runs a clown government

      Reply
  3. David

     /  1st May 2020

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/121350448/coronavirus-the-importance-of-jacinda-ardern-sharing-the-spotlight-during-covid19-pandemic

    This one is just as bad. I dont mind some praise of her actions and her clearly fantastic qualities but she aint perfect and hasnt been a particularly effective PM particularly on the issues she campaigned on.
    The lockdown by all accounts she had to be pushed into doing should have got a mention, she was pushed into quarantining at the border and her timidity is seeing us locked down for longer in a harsh way while she was slow in sorting out the contact tracing which are legitimate criticisms but not ones that are personal.
    A bit of journalisming would be welcome.

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  1st May 2020

      The sort of ‘journalisming’ that checks things like ‘by all accounts she had to be pushed into’ and ‘she was pushed into quarantining’ ?

      Reply
      • David

         /  1st May 2020

        She has done well dont get me wrong but its absurd for our media to spend their days trying to outdo each other in heaping praise on her when any objective look would show more than a few holes.
        If she had the testing right why arnt we in level 2 already. Why was she so slow in quarantining given thats where all of the cases were coming from. Why have we had infections in hospitals from transferring rest home folk. Why has the privacy act been prioritized ahead of contact tracing (personal experience). Why is Bunnings etc. shut. Is the level system way too prescriptive so shops can only open when bars do.
        It would be nice to have inquisitive journalism because lets face it we havent been given much information except what she has allowed us to have.

        Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  1st May 2020

    It’s a worry that our universities now have a School of Government. Talk about an elite thinking they are born to rule.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  1st May 2020

      Most countries have them…its where they teach students intended for government on how to speak or write without much knowledge

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  1st May 2020

        They need to start teaching the universities some ethical principles.

        Reply
        • Kimbo

           /  1st May 2020

          …and real critical skills, not the lazy left wing dialectic/critical theory imposter.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  1st May 2020

            This was Oxford University back in the 80s ..Johnsons time
            “In an essay for The Oxford Myth (1988), a book edited by his sister Rachel, Johnson advised aspiring student politicians to assemble “a disciplined and deluded collection of stooges” to get out the vote. “Lonely girls from the women’s colleges” who “back their largely male candidates with a porky decisiveness” were particularly useful, he wrote. “For these young women, machine politics offers human friction and warmth.” Reading this, you realise why almost all Union presidents who become Tory politicians are men. (Thatcher’s domain was OUCA, where she was president in 1946.)

            Johnson added: “The tragedy of the stooge is that . . . he wants so much to believe that his relationship with the candidate is special that he shuts out the truth. The terrible art of the candidate is to coddle the self-deception of the stooge.”
            https://www.ft.com/content/85fc694c-9222-11e9-b7ea-60e35ef678d2

            Reply
            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              Yeah, nah, sorry. I get it that there is a stream of consciousness going on there, but too obscure, too long a bow to draw, just too…intellectually self-indulgent for any intelligent discourse.

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              Mind you, given the well-deserved reputation Cambridge earned for being a hotbed of communist sleeper agents who infiltrated the British government and establishment from the 1930s on, it would seem only fair if Oxford evened up the score. Wonder if outdoing Cambridge earned Boris his blue! 😂

            • Duker

               /  1st May 2020

              Are you always this pretentious … this here aint the New York Review of Books …[deleted]

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              No, just working with your conspiracy theory re Johnson: “So, Boris, when you were a Oxford did you play cricket, rugger, row…or outdo Cambridge infiltrating the British Civil Service?”

              And like music and movie stars, male politicians don’t need to assemble groupies. As per Henry Kissinger and power being the ultimate aphrodisiac, the camp followers naturally materialise. I don’t make the rules, I just report them…

            • Duker

               /  1st May 2020

              Not a conspiracy ..just that a place like Oxford wasnt all that challenging for Johnson at least….his rise in politics was far more due to his early political cunning AND after graduation going straight into The Conservative Party ‘Research unit’

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              So essentially the same political apprenticeship and career pathway as Jacinda Ardern and Grant Robertson? 🤣

  5. duperez

     /  1st May 2020

    The sad thing is that some things that Ardern does that are so ordinary have been lauded as being so exceptional. Or should be so ordinary.

    That is a comment on what the world and its inhabitants are like.

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  1st May 2020

      Like what?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  1st May 2020

        Serving barbecued steaks to folk up at Waitangi around Waitangi Day?

        I mean, who hasn’t served barbecued steaks to folk at Waitangi (apart from you & me the day we visited the Treaty Grounds)?

        (I never managed to get the mud completely out of that hanky I wiped my shoes down with after I walked backwards into that bloody drainage ditch while videoing the big waka & landing area. Waitangi mud sticks like shit to a blanket. I’ve still got the hanky as a souveneir of that visit tho.)

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  1st May 2020

          Most PMs media appearances are ordinary…the school..the factory ..the shopping mall.
          Its ordinary for very deliberate reasons that seem to have escaped you

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  1st May 2020

            No, they probably haven’t. The reason’s obvious to everyone.

            The reason I posted what I did above has clearly escaped you though, because you’re so one dimensional.

            Here’s a clue, and a recommendation:

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  1st May 2020

              Yawn… the background visuals are to connect with most voters everyday lives.
              Stick to the days of their lives of your pukekos and ‘other feathered visitors’…perhaps theres a Watership Down to come out ..perhaps not

            • Gezza

               /  1st May 2020

              Yawn… the background visuals are to connect with most voters everyday lives

              Yawn. Everybody SO knows that it doesn’t even need saying here.

              🤔 Although I suppose a total bloody plonker might think it did.

              Keep going for the berley. I never let an opportunity to entice an orc into making a public exhibition of their nasty nature go by.
              … … …
              Burglar alarm box looks good after a good rub down with sandpaper. 2nd coat of CRC Rust Converter applied; will let it work itself into any subsurface ferrous oxide over the next 20 hours or so, then put 3 coats of acrylic gloss white on it.

      • duperez

         /  1st May 2020

        Just doing her job! I can’t find the Fox Carlson Tucker spiel but here is one I bumped into. From 10:00 on : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lrj0c3Ta-Tg

        Like saying some things that are twee to some, such as ‘be nice.’ That’s an attempt to affect the environment we operate in. The leader expecting people to act in certain ways is an inherent part of the job. Like exhibiting some base humanity post the Christchurch slaughter.

        I don’t see those as exceptional. The reactions are.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  1st May 2020

          I don’t recall any of our previous leaders not exhibiting base humanity towards disaster victims and survivors. Do you?

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  1st May 2020

            “I don’t recall any of our previous leaders not exhibiting base humanity towards disaster victims…” really
            ‘The first thing is I’m here to give you absolute reassurance, we’re committed to getting the boys out, and nothing’s going to change that. So – when people try and tell you we’re not, they’re playing, I hate to say it, but they’re playing with your emotions.’- from the video footage.
            Later reneged on.

            Reply
            • David

               /  1st May 2020

              50 odd million spent now on this voting bribe and still no one out despite all the promises. Key’s government did all they could its just a petty pedantic partisan complaint you throw up when you cant slot in English’s housing.
              As usual no value added to the post from you.

          • duperez

             /  1st May 2020

            No. Did the media act like it was a big deal when they did? And, just as importantly, did the critics?

            Reply
          • Kimbo

             /  1st May 2020

            As we mentioned last week I think, Helen Clark towards the misfortune and disaster that beset the hapless Mike Moore wasn’t very high in the empathy stakes! More like “black widow”…😂

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  1st May 2020

              To be fair she wasn’t a Christian. The people who are censurious, hypercritical, hypocritical, unempathetic & unforgiving who I find the more worthy of condemnation are those who profess to be Christians but in their actions are so un-Christlike you have to wonder about their self-awareness & their ability to live up to the principles they preach.

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              “To be fair she wasn’t a Christian…”

              Seems irrelevant to the subject at hand but as she professed to be a good democratic socialist (arguably a secular version of the biblical injunction to love your neighbour as yourself) by her own lights the way she used and then disposed of Moore was pretty…cold.

              But ultimately she was a competent leader and given the nature of her vocation there is seldom a “nice” way to gain the crown. So joking aside, she deserved credit for the skill with which she disposed of Moore.

              And Christians are especially hypocritical? Maybe or maybe they are (as above) your Rorschach Test. Human folly, including the capacity for self delusion is a universal trait although I’d accept the religious or ideologically-captured are maybe more susceptible.

              More troubling is when the religious don’t understand the constitution. In whatever sense we may have once been a “Christian” country, that no longer applies. You have no special privileges or rights, including stemming the tide of legal reform in abortion, euthanasia or recreational drug decriminalisation. A recent visit to the Facebook page of an overtly Christian MP disabused me of the notion that many NZ Christians have a sound grasp of our constitution. What they seemed to be insisting once was and now should be the case is a Christian theocracy with imposed morality. No thanks, go to Tehran if you want that…

            • Gezza

               /  1st May 2020

              Seems irrelevant to the subject at hand

              Perhaps it was meant to be relevant in an ever-so-slightly different context & pleasantly succeeded in its objective. It gives me a neutral opportunity to apologise for a past misunderstanding that got out of hand & is regretted.

              but as she professed to be a good democratic socialist (arguably a secular version of the biblical injunction to love your neighbour as yourself) by her own lights the way she used and then disposed of Moore was pretty…cold.

              But ultimately she was a competent leader and given the nature of her vocation there is seldom a “nice” way to gain the crown. So joking aside, she deserved credit for the skill with which she disposed of Moore.

              I think whether being a socialist is arguably a secular version of the bib,ical command to love thy neighbour as thyself is a bit of a stretch, tbh, Kimbo. My own view is that that has more to do primarily with wanting to achieve more equitable distribution of wealth & the state taking a bigger role in providing social and other services free or more cheaply in preference to user pays private profit-oriented service providers.

              I got a bit lost over exactly what you meant in the rest of that towards the end. I have sympathy & understanding for those who are opposed to abortion; also understanding of those opposed to euthanasia – altho less sympathy in that case.

              Those who argue (& this includes my former GP, at my last visit, unprompted, & which I think was completely improper) that assisted dying should be voted against because these days there is no need for anybody to die in pain, completely ignore that many of those who would choose that option would do so to end the psychological distress of the many other appalling physical “discomforts” & the loss of agency & dignity that accompanies a long drawn out death from, say, metastatic colon cancer.

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              My target was Christians who throw up their hands and wail while begging the uestion, “how come we have abortion/euthanasia reform/drug reform/sodomy/cats living with dogs

              …when we are meant to be a Christian country?! We must claim this nation back for Jesus!”

              Leaving aside the zeal (which, as John Calvin observed, without knowledge is like a sword in the hands of a lunatic)

              It is troubling to behold the…constitutional stupidity. Plus the self indulgent echo chamber in which those who profess “spiritual discernment” that will make the nation wise create. Same shit 34 years ago with Homosexual decriminalisation. If they could, they WOULD make being gay illegal again. All for Jesus.

              Well, this Christian says…fuck off. In a loving manner, of course. 😳😂

            • Gezza

               /  1st May 2020

              Ok. Yep. Can see that now. 👍🏼

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              And plenty will argue against euthanasia because….Jesus…image of God…slippery slope…oppose godlessness…Christian nation…Pope commands…Bible says…etc. Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer pick on who is unethical and without empathy.

              But we DON’T privilege religion in the matter. Or at least we shouldn’t.

        • Duker

           /  1st May 2020

          Base humanity …you mean like Scott Morrison exhibited during their bush fire emergencies….
          You are confused over ordinary and doing it well so it seems effortless….

          Bill English liked to project himself as ‘compassionate’ …they have strategic media advisors to work on these things for them.
          Key did the every day man and blokey image , but it was a fake..golfing with Presidents .

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  1st May 2020

            I knew you would go for him so I said “our leaders”.

            Morrison seems to have learnt from his mistakes.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  1st May 2020

              The state premiers have by passed him as they have authority on the ground.
              Morrison has been back and forth and round and round. But then again like you only looking at Trumps edited transcripts ( it was live to millions …the ratings) to find what you want to hear….which is leftys putting words in his mouth.
              Some people
              “As my nephew, a teacher, texted me last night, he’s still allowed to teach a class of 30 children but if he dies from the virus caught there only 10 can come to his funeral. If he remarried only four others could be there but if he called it a boot camp 10 could come. Which makes for a clear message.

              As the prime minister drifted back and forth in his rambling comments, shopping centres around the nation were closed early on in the presser, only to be reopened 15 minutes later. The prime minister wanted to be clear and the nation could agree on that much at least. But the problem is that every time he speaks nothing is clear.
              . When on Sunday night David Speers asked him in an ABC interview a simple, straightforward question that was perplexing many Australians at that moment – exactly what was an essential service? – Morrison disappeared into aggressive evasion, losing much of a national audience desperate to know the answer to this and so many questions.”
              “Why else, when the gravity of the crisis was already apparent and the need for social distancing clear, did he smilingly say he would be going to the football?”
              https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/mar/26/australia-is-scared-and-confused-about-coronavirus-is-scott-morrison-the-leader-we-need-for-this-grave-moment

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  1st May 2020

              A month old Guardian article. Are you serious?

            • Kimbo

               /  1st May 2020

              Of course. It is holy writ for Chardonnay Socialists, Alan! Joking aside Helen Clark used to get a copy every day. So much for NZ PM’s throwing off the cultural cringe! 😀🇬🇧

            • Duker

               /  1st May 2020

              “As the prime minister drifted back and forth in his rambling comments, shopping centres around the nation were closed early on in the presser, only to be reopened 15 minutes later. ”
              https://www.afr.com/property/commercial/major-shopping-malls-could-be-shut-by-tuesday-20200322-p54coj

              It did happen like that , he meant food courts and Trump did the same ‘Closed the airports to everyone from Europe’ which was then corrected after the speech to only non americans blocked.

  6. For those who liked Is Ardern going to change the world? may also enjoy: Jacinda Ardern chats to Suzy Cato

    Reply
  7. Pink David

     /  1st May 2020

    Lola Toppin-Casserly has written a job applcation.

    Reply
    • oldlaker

       /  1st May 2020

      PD That’s exactly what I thought when I read the article. And Newsroom’s reliance on sponsors (including universities) means they are obliged to publish this kind of blather. It’s a great weakness.
      Calling Ardern honest is outrageously dishonest. Steve Elers got into trouble this week for pointing out her claim about testing in a speech on Monday April 20 was false. In fact, economist Ian Harrison (ex RBNZ, world Bank, IMF) found six false claims in that particular speech. It pains me to say it, not least because I voted for her, that she lies like a flatfish.
      https://croakingcassandra.files.wordpress.com/2020/04/a-fact-check-of-the-prime-minstere28099s-20-april-coronavirus-presentation-ian-harrison.pdf?

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  1st May 2020

        “Steve Elers got into trouble this week for pointing out her claim about testing ”
        Thats was a falsehood by Elers, most of those ‘ ahead’ in the testing stakes were micro countries/city states etc
        Based on actual countries we were just in the 6-8th in say 150 countries.
        Faeroe Is was up there at the top with the Falkland Islands, Malta , San Marino, Bahrain
        Now that we are level 3 the testing daily has become half or less

        Elers wasprobably doing a job application of a different kind..maybe that well known Massey University Professor of Politics/Communication isnt around any more for National Party political contract work

        Reply
        • oldlaker

           /  1st May 2020

          NZ is 30th on the rankings today. A handful, not most of those, ahead of us, are “micro-states”.
          Any opinion on the other five false claims in just one speech by Ardern itemised by Ian Harrison? (As it happens, he included the claims about testing as his sixth.)
          I’d love to know how many NZers would rate a sports team coming in at 30th in the world as among the best.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  1st May 2020

            It was 7th or 8th amoung ‘actual countries’ when I fact checked Elers – last week.
            Ever heard of Podium Finish? being even in the top 10 of 150 countries is ‘world class’

            Its obvious why San Marino, Falkland Is and Faeroe Is , Malta etc are way up near the top

            Reply
    • artcroft

       /  1st May 2020

      I guess the School of Govt is unaware of the principle of a politically neutral civil service.

      Reply
  8. Sally Poutai

     /  1st May 2020

    This is an example of the blind leading the blind. How any leader can be considered ethical when they support and pass legislation that permits the killing of children and supports other legislation that encourages adults to kill themselves?

    How can a leader be ethical when they borrow the methods and madness of Communist China to manage a “pandemic” that is considerably less deadly than the seasonal flu. Policies that deny the sick and elderly visits from their loved ones even at the point of death and preventing people from holding funerals. A lockdown will destroy personal and economic freedom and make us all more dependent upon the government and large corporations?

    The population of NZ is being ruled by fear and sold a new normal that has been created by decades of media propaganda and the lockdown itself and will be reinforced by a constant state of emergency and medical dictatorship. A successful vaccine for SARS coronavirus doesn’t exist 11 years after the event for scientific reasons. What makes people think it will be any different for COVID-19?

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  1st May 2020

      Legislation has permitted abortions since the mid 70s…so your point is

      Reply

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