Despite fine, reparation and sentence police restrain all company’s assets for ‘proceeds of crime’ over a Health and Safety offence

A workplace accident and employee death in 2015 resulted in a costing a company nearly $400,000 in fines and reparations, and the company owner, who accepted responsibility, being  sentenced to four and a half months home detention in 2017.

But that wasn’t the end of the matter. Two years later, late in 2019, police restrained all of the company owner’s assets under the proceeds of crime legislation.

… it was in relation to the same health and safety prosecution in which Ron and Salters Cartage had already pleaded guilty and been sentenced.  Having already secured a criminal conviction, the police had decided to take the extraordinary step of pursuing a business owner through the civil courts for the alleged “proceeds” of a health and safety offence.

It looks like a fairly ordinary Kiwi family bloke and business owner could lose everything he had built up over 38 years.

This is an extraordinary story, and quite alarming, unless there is something else to this story not yet revealed by the police.


The police want to take every dollar Ron Salter has ever made

A South Auckland businessman is under siege by police who are using laws designed to target gangs and drug dealers to come after his family business, his home, and even his children’s assets. At a time when we’ve handed police extraordinary powers to deal with a health pandemic, Matt Blomfield argues that trust is being betrayed.

Over the last five years I have carved out a role for myself as a person you turn to when things go bad. And when I say bad I have seen some pretty spectacular f*ck ups. When you are in the business of fixing life’s little mistakes, you find that your work comes from all walks of life and try as I might I like to think I don’t discriminate when it comes to my clients.

During that time, I have worked for some amazing people and also some infamous individuals. Often the balance between what is morally correct and my own personal view that everyone deserves help is something I struggle with.

When I discuss it with friends and family, I often reference the obligations that lawyers have when representing a client. Everyone has a right to justice and should have an opportunity to have their side of the story heard.

The slight difference is that I like to  think that my role includes an added bonus in that I can attempt to get things back on track and show my clients that life is just that little bit simpler if you play by the rules and remove some of the complication that comes with pushing boundaries.

In saying that sometimes I have clients where a clear cut injustice has occurred, and there is zero moral ambiguity. Where bad luck has combined with an extraordinary set of circumstances to result in an unjust outcome. These are the ones I enjoy the most.

So with the blessing of my client I would like to ask you to listen to a story not about Covid-19, but about an unfortunate sequence of events which has left my client fighting for their very survival.

In late 2015 I was introduced to Ron Salter who is the owner and founder of Salters Cartage, a South Auckland waste collection and recycling company.

A few months earlier, on September 15, 2015, Jamey Lee Bowring, an employee of a contractor to Salters Cartage, called Raceworks, working at the Salters Cartage business, was killed after the 100,000-litre fuel tank he was welding exploded.

It was a tragedy, a young man losing his life at just 24 years old. There were no winners in this story. I recall thinking about Jamie’s mother and how she would have reacted when she got the news. I have two daughters and in my mind I’m not sure if I could think of a worse situation than me outliving one of them.

Like all of the cases I work on, the first thing I try to do is understand the client. What am I dealing with and what is really going on here?

Ron Salter is by trade a truck driver, who over several decades built up a very successful business. He is a hard man and initially that was all I saw. It wasn’t until I had spent a couple of months working with Ron that I actually found out who he is.

Ron is first and foremost a family man, and Salters Cartage is a family business.  The kind of business that is the backbone of New Zealand’s economy.

The more time I spent with the Salter family the more I came to understand that this was the quintessential Kiwi family running their own business and Ron was that hard arse dad who secretly was a big softy and loved his family unconditionally.

Just prior to lockdown I noticed a picture of Ron on his daughter’s Facebook page. He was in the swimming pool with his granddaughter. His daughter commented: “As a kid growing up I don’t remember my dad getting in the pool/water but little miss says “pop pop come in water” and he’s in”.

That side of Ron is why, at the earliest opportunity, he said sorry for the accident and accepted he made a mistake. This was something Ron insisted on.

Just over two years on from Jamie’s death, on November 23, 2017, Ron was sentenced to four and a half months’ home detention and he and his company were ordered to pay nearly $400,000 in fines and reparations, which they did.

The same day a story was published in the New Zealand Herald entitled “Auckland business owner sentenced for fuel tank explosion which killed worker”. The story includes a video interview of Ron which captures the man I know and the hurt that he and his family went through.

That’s not to say what happened to the Salter family could ever compete with losing a child. Jamie’s mother Sarah Ferguson has said she does not accept Ron’s remorse and I don’t think I could if I was her.

My role with Salters Cartage finished up in early 2018. It was an interesting project, it touched on so many aspects of life, a mother losing a child, a business owner dealing with the guilt and responsibility for the part they played, the all-encompassing litigation process, something that I understand all too well, the toll that can take on individuals, and the support of wider friends and family unit that rallied around during this awful time. There were no winners in this story, but it was finally over. Justice was done.

Moving forward, I would check in with Ron and the family on occasion. They had a job to get on with and didn’t need my help. They were rebuilding their lives and getting their Salters Cartage family back on track. I heard through a mutual acquaintance that Ron was looking at selling the business and retiring and I recall thinking that it was not surprising. Ron had done it hard over the past few years.

Then in December last year I heard that the police had restrained all of Ron’s assets under the proceeds of crime legislation.

At the time I had limited knowledge of proceeds of crime laws and my immediate reaction was ‘what have I missed’? My mind conjured up images of drug dealing and gangs. It just made no sense.

After further clarification I realised that it was in relation to the same health and safety prosecution in which Ron and Salters Cartage had already pleaded guilty and been sentenced.  Having already secured a criminal conviction, the police had decided to take the extraordinary step of pursuing a business owner through the civil courts for the alleged “proceeds” of a health and safety offence.

I called Ron and he explained in a slightly panicked fashion, “they are wanting to take my house, my daughter’s house, the bach, the business, everything”. His life’s work and his legacy. I was lost for words. It just didn’t make any sense to me.

I recall thinking about double jeopardy – the principle that a person should not be subject to two prosecutions or punishments for the same offence. And then wondering whether a claim to forfeit assets constitutes a second punishment or a severely harsh punishment when viewed together with the original sentence.

It was a major, the Salter family stood to lose a lifetime of effort. This was not just Ron’s business, it’s the Salter family business which includes the families of their 30 employees, who are essentially an extension of the family.

Police have sought restraints over more than $8 million of the Salters’ personal assets as well as business assets over and above this.  An application to forfeit those same assets will inevitably follow.

To be clear, this legislation was brought in to go after drug dealers, gang members, money launderers and other sophisticated criminal enterprises that break the law for commercial gain. It operates on a simple philosophy: the police say ‘we think you’ve obtained this by nefarious means, prove us wrong’.

The reach of the legislation extends to anything that the police believe is “tainted”. The example I use is if a drug dealer owns a house and pays for a new roof with drug money, the police can take the house. The police can also take untainted assets to the value of the benefit they say you have received as a result of criminal activity.  It’s hard for me to draw a parallel between a gang member selling methamphetamine and Salters Cartage collecting and recycling waste oil.   As bizarre as it sounds, the police are saying the income that Salters Cartage received is like drug money. If it is, so too is the income of the hundreds of businesses convicted of health and safety offences in New Zealand every year, let alone other regulatory offences.  What’s next – resource management breaches?

In the five years to July 2014, police restrained nearly half a billion dollars worth of cash, property, cars, boats, motorcycles with gold-plate rims and every other trapping of a drug dealer’s lifestyle you can imagine. Police estimated half of that came from methamphetamine.

The recovered money goes into a contestable fund that has provided millions to drug and alcohol rehabilitation services, mental health services and crime reduction initiatives. Proper Robin Hood stuff.

However, in the Salters Cartage case the police are using the proceeds of crime legislation for the first time in the aftermath of a health and safety case.

In an exit interview with the Herald just a few weeks ago, the former commissioner of police Mike Bush summed up one of the key tenets of his six year tenure as follows: “How we apply our discretion is critical to building trust and confidence.”

“The one thing people look for is the consistent application. And that’s what we’ve been driving hard.”

If that’s the case, why didn’t the police attempt to seize Watercare’s assets, after the 2011 explosion that killed one of its workers and left another a double amputee? Or Canadian Piping, the firm convicted of failing to protect employees in the same blast. Should the directors of Watercare have feared that their family homes were at risk?

There have been around 700 workplace deaths in New Zealand since 2011, and more than two dozen firms have been prosecuted for breaching the health and safety legislation where death occurred.

Where is the consistent application of the law that Bush is so proud of?

It is no secret that New Zealand’s small to medium enterprises are the backbone of this country. Right now, as we emerge from Level 4 lockdown, they are at once under unprecedented strain while being needed more than ever to jumpstart our post-COVID 19 economy.

According to one Government estimate, they make up 97 per cent of all New Zealand businesses, employ more than 630,000 people or 29 per cent of all New Zealand workers.

It’s tough enough running your own business, as a business owner you take responsibility for the livelihoods of all of your staff, you take responsibility for the risks that come with owning your business from loans to compliance to tax.

If it goes badly you can’t just walk away. These business owners are brave and they should be respected, they should be looked after, and they should be supported.  Without them, the economic landscape in New Zealand would be very different.

We spend plenty of time making sure that employees are looked after and that they have the support of their employers.  And rightly so.  But less time is spent thinking about the brave directors that take on the responsibilities and risks that create employment. I can imagine that many will say that with risk comes reward and I accept that but, in this case, we are talking about a family that could lose everything they have earned in the past 38 years.  There are many, many other businesses out there just like Salters Cartage.

This will have an effect on three generations of this family. Putting aside the inevitable closure of Salters Cartage as we know it if the police are successful, we are talking about Ron and his wife Natalie’s daughter’s home, the family bach, the home in which Ron and Natalie planned to live out their retirement, and finally the livelihoods of all of the staff and their families.

So, most of my lockdown was spent trying to find a way through for the Salter family. That now includes dealing with Covid-19 and the fact they have all but closed the doors over the lockdown.  They have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars but, unlike many other businesses, all of their staff still have their jobs.

The Salter family is doing it hard.  Ron and his family accepted responsibility for what happened;  Ron and Salters Cartage performed the sentence imposed.  In addition to funding this litigation, which will could take years to resolve, now they have the added complication of Covid-19.  In my mind it’s just not fair. I really wish the police would use their resources, budget and energy to take down gangs and drug dealers because isn’t that what the proceeds of crime legislation was intended for? I can’t rationalise in my mind why the police have put the Salters family, and family businesses just like theirs, at the top of their to-do list, while many who have clearly profited from crime flaunt their wealth on Instagram. It just does not make sense!

Salters Cartage is truly a family owned and operated New Zealand business. It is an example of what makes New Zealand great and what we need to focus on to get through this Covid-19 debacle. I am confident that the police will be unsuccessful in their case but my hope is that the fight doesn’t destroy this amazing family and the New Zealand-owned family business that was almost 40 years in the making. That’s not justice and not what New Zealand wants or deserves from the New Zealand police.

Matt Blomfield is a business consultant and the subject of Whale Oil, a book about standing up to bullies and his quest for justice. It was nominated in the best general non-fiction category at the 2020 Ockham Awards.

Leave a comment

66 Comments

  1. Blazer

     /  3rd May 2020

    This story looks particularly one sided and does not pass the ‘sniff’ test.
    The Police side of the story is not presented, just Blomfields biased assumptions.

    Reply
    • RNZ: Police use of proceeds of crime laws in health and safety case ‘staggering’

      The police are using the proceeds of crimes laws for the first time in a health and safety case against Ron Salter, who runs Salters Cartage in Wiri.

      Police have now sought restraints over more than $8 million of personal and business assets. They say the law is there to stop people from profiting from crime while also deterring others.

      But police said the purpose of the Criminal Proceeds (Recovery) Act was to stop people from profiting out of crime and deterring those from committing it.

      “Its wider purpose is therefore [to] change behaviour so as to reduce the occurrence of crime and make our communities safer,” Detective Inspector Craig Hamilton said.

      Hamilton, the head of Financial Crime Group, said it was the first time the Act had been used to forfeit proceeds that had been earned as a result of deliberate non-compliance with health and safety law.

      Hamilton said the investigation had not concluded and the case may broaden.

      Also: When fines are not enough – should workplace health and safety offending lead to seizure of assets as proceeds of crime?

      If the Police succeed in seizing assets from Mr Salter and his business, this case will be a significant precedent for future health and safety offending. In simple terms, businesses (and their owners) who fail to comply with workplace health and safety requirements will risk both penalties under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015 (HSWA) and asset seizure if the business or its owners have unlawfully benefitted from that offending.

      This would be a disturbing and detrimental development. In our view, the penalty regime under the HSWA is sufficient to punish the various types of offending that can arise from poor health and safety practices without the need to also use the CPRA and seize the assets of offenders.

      Also: Cash grab: Cops seize property worth millions over health and safety breaches

      Reply
    • artcroft

       /  3rd May 2020

      What assumptions? If you are suggesting that Salter has been involved in other illegal activities he should be charged and convicted of these. But he hasn’t been, so the police are doing what Blomfield states. You make the assumptions, not him.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  3rd May 2020

        ‘Hamilton said the investigation had not concluded and the case may broaden.’

        Blomfield-‘
        So with the blessing of my client …’
        I thought Blomfield sold…pizzas.

        Reply
        • artcroft

           /  3rd May 2020

          You’re full of assumptions today. Perhaps more research less guessing is in order.

          Reply
        • He hasn’t been involved in the pizza business for over a decade.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  3rd May 2020

            What business is he involved in these days?

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Hectre …Orchard Management

              but this is more interesting
              Bishop Warden …Debt Recovery …hmm “Court Action isnt our last option..its our First”

      • Duker

         /  3rd May 2020

        Salter WAS the worst of the worst for these sorts of offences. And he was convicted on a case that meant he could be imprisoned ..but got home detention

        Reply
        • After the lockdown, I am more convinced than ever that ‘HD’ is not the soft option that it’s made out to be. If it was me, I’d infinitely prefer it to The Big House, but for someone who doesn’t have my vast book collection and wouldn’t read them if they could, it would be terrible.

          Reply
  2. artcroft

     /  3rd May 2020

    F***k. I hope they hold the police commissioner to the same standard.

    Reply
  3. David

     /  3rd May 2020

    Did he pay the fine ? I couldnt see that referred to.
    I think there are a lot more time plod could be seizing the owners assets particularly in employment cases with a particular issue with migrant business owners exploiting migrant workers. Sorry bit off topic but if you get fines by the courts they should do whatever is needed to collect the money.

    Reply
    • “Ron was sentenced to four and a half months’ home detention and he and his company were ordered to pay nearly $400,000 in fines and reparations, which they did.”

      The claim is that $8 million worth of assets have been seized.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  3rd May 2020

        If the fine has not been paid,that seizure may help.
        Note-‘Hamilton said the investigation had not concluded and the case may broaden.’

        Reply
      • David

         /  3rd May 2020

        That makes absolutely no sense. Is he expecting us to believe that he paid the fine in full years ago and then the coppers have just decided out of the blue to seize all his assets to cover a non existent debt using the proceeds of crime act.
        Its a strange act because the seize first and return later and the onus is on you to prove your assets were legitimately earned but its for criminal conduct, he apparently runs a legitimate trucking firm.
        If you dont pay a fine then an application is made to the high court to seize assets which are then realized and the fine paid and any surplus returned.

        Reply
        • Proceeds of Crime Act can’t be used for unpaid fines, or it shouldn’t be, they are quite different things.

          Reply
          • David

             /  3rd May 2020

            That was my point its just not something they would use and its not something the coppers ever get involved with its court bailiffs, the coppers see these things as civil issues and thy dont have the skill set to help.
            There must be something more to it.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Dont have the skill set ?
              Around $100 mill last year in asset forfeiture …I think they know what they are doing..

            • David

               /  3rd May 2020

              Duker do you ever actually read whats written or do you just not find anything written that is wrong so just pretend something is and go all hall monitor.

            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Clearly the Cops are doing multi million $ forfeitures all the time to get to $100 mill in a year. Why knowledge do you have to say ‘coppers dont get involved’?
              Your querys dont make sense

              Have You read the Health and Safety At Work Act
              for your elucidation

              137 Proceedings for infringement offence
              (1)A person who is alleged to have committed an infringement offence may either—
              (a)be proceeded against by the filing of a charging document under section 14 of the Criminal Procedure Act 2011; or
              (b)be served with an infringement notice under section 138.

              http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/2015/0070/latest/whole.html#DLM5976660
              Worksafe would have done the original prosecution, but it was filed as criminal proceedings.
              Hence the ‘Proceeds of Crime’ actions by the police , who are enforcement agents here for the Official Assignee

  4. Blazer

     /  3rd May 2020

    the onus is on disproving the Police case.’Wayne Doyle is considered by many to be a pillar of his community – a former bad boy who’s trying to turn lives around through his boxing gym.’

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/97256789/head-hunters-boss-wayne-doyle-will-have-to-prove-his-6m-of-property-is-legit

    Reply
  5. artcroft

     /  3rd May 2020

    From The RNZ article:
    “But police said the purpose of the Criminal Proceeds (Recovery) Act was to stop people from profiting out of crime and deterring those from committing it.

    “Its wider purpose is therefore [to] change behaviour so as to reduce the occurrence of crime and make our communities safer,” Detective Inspector Craig Hamilton said”.

    So police think their role is to engineer changes to business practice now. Strange world we live in when the Mongrol Mob has a better relationship with police HQ (and a personal mobile numbers of top cops) than ordinary workers.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  3rd May 2020

      So I mention a case of asset confiscation which is clearly on topic…you allege ‘squirrel’ behaviour and then mention the Mongrel Mob and their access to Police.

      Nice work …’pot’.

      Reply
    • Duker

       /  3rd May 2020

      “Safety breaches that led to the death of a worker in a tank explosion in south Auckland were on a par with Pike River, a long-time WorkSafe investigator says.”
      https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/344547/flagrant-breaches-led-to-tank-explosion-death

      It wasnt just ‘business practice’ , he was probably the worst of the worst
      “Part of the fine was for breaching a prohibition notice set in place after the death.”
      ‘Auckland Council had also issued the business with an abatement notice the month before the fatal accident.’

      The prick continued in his unsafe ways

      Reply
      • It was obviously an awful accident and the fines show that there were major safety breaches, but there’s more to it than that.

        Bowring had been working on tank 20, which had been labelled a diesel tank. But it was used instead for waste oil and held a combination of fuels and gas.

        The young man was on the site after offering to help his mother’s partner, Trevor Ackers, carry out maintenance work on the tanks.

        He had taken a sick day from his usual job at GT Engineering.

        Ackers’ Huntly business RaceWorks, which was also charged after the accident, had been contracted to Salter’s Cartage.

        Judge McIlraith said RaceWorks didn’t properly train Bowring for the work he was doing on the day of the accident.

        RaceWorks was convicted and discharged and not ordered to pay any costs.

        https://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11946963

        Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  3rd May 2020

        What was the abatement notice for? What was non-compliant? What warnings haf been given? None of these articles give any relevant information.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  3rd May 2020

          Clearly there was evidence of hazardous activity …. it was a month before the accident … the accident showed he wasnt compliant and the prohibition breach AFTER the death meant he continued to ignore his legal obligations.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  3rd May 2020

            None of that either answers my question or indicates you know the answers.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Squirrels
              https://ourauckland.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/articles/media/council/2015/09/salters-cartage-explosion/
              So there were other issues not connected to the tank welding which killed the young guy.

              You arent a worksafe investigator .
              Im sure the asset forfeiture before the Courts will provide far more information
              There was evidence Salter was using a PR company to white wash his image since then.
              https://www.mediacouncil.org.nz/rulings/sarah-ferguson-against-new-zealand-herald
              The Blomfield version here , in a way is old news the Herald first covered it back in Feb , and yet it pops up here as ‘revelations with editorialising’ .
              Was there another/same version on DailyBlog?
              https://thedailyblog.co.nz/2020/05/03/special-investigation-matthew-blomfield-the-police-want-to-take-every-dollar-ron-salter-has-ever-made/

            • Yes the situation has already been covered by media two or three months ago, but Blomfield is relating it to Covid by saying that it’s tough enough for small businesses as it is at the present time without having all their assets on hold as well.

              You’ll have to ask Bradbury why he is headlining it as a special investigation, he seems to have received the same media release I did.

            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Salter has used PR company before
              ‘ In relation to the question by Ms Ferguson “whether a PR company was hired by Ronald Salter”, Mr Reed advised “There was no PR company hired by Salter – or any other PR company – involved in this story.
              David Fisher (the author of the article) was aware that Salter had retained some kind of PR representative but had no dealings with them while planning and writing this story.”
              https://www.mediacouncil.org.nz/rulings/sarah-ferguson-against-new-zealand-herald

              It has definite PR spin to many aspects , the Covid thing came AFTER the story broke in Feb
              How many small businesses kill an employee at work , in a situation the Worksafe investigator described as ‘worst of the worst’

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2020

              So the abatement notice was completely irrelevant to the explosion which also occurred prior to the time the abatement notice gave for compliance.

              Hardly a squirrel.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2020

              So it just shows you were b.s-ing ignorantly as usual.

            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Evidence of his grossly irregular work practices …you keep forgetting the prohibition order he ignored which was imposed by Worksafe after the death….this was dealt with by the Judge.
              Theres a reason he was described as “worst of the worst”…. careful which birds of a feather you defend.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2020

              I like to see the evidence before I convict someone, Duker. An odd notion to you I appreciate.

              Where is the link and justification for this “worst of the worst” accusation you keep making?

            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/344547/flagrant-breaches-led-to-tank-explosion-death
              Flagrant….. I have a feeling his oil recovery business is a “cesspit”… No evidence yet but more will be revealed in court case when the property to be siezed by the crown will be reviewed and Salter will have his chance to make his case to the judge, remembering he doesn’t have to have convictions for prior acts before the young man was killed.
              Remember drug dealers get convicted for maybe one offence but their I’ll gotten gains from the likely previous crime is siezed.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  4th May 2020

              Where is the missing “worst of the worst”?

              As for the other quote, it is about the magnitude of the explosion, not the extent of the non-compliance. And the post explosion offence has nothing whatever to do with the claim profits were made from crime over many years. The police actions appear to be a direct, gross and disgusting abuse of power.

            • Gezza

               /  4th May 2020

              It will be interesting to see what eventually comes out of this. What I’ve read suggests he has an abrasive personality. One wonders whether he aggravated someone in the Police sufficiently to provoke a vindictive response, or whether there is a lot more history to his offending than has been revealed so far.

          • Blazer

             /  3rd May 2020

            Good work here D.
            This reminds me of the paid for PR ‘charm offensive’ campaign for Hanover wide boy Mark Hotchin,by Slater,Odgers and Lusk, as they tried to whitewash his part in relieving retirees of their life savings.

            I see he recently bought a ‘hut’ in Remmers for $8mil.

            Successful failures….aren’t they just so…..common.

            Reply
      • artcroft

         /  3rd May 2020

        Then new H and S charges should be laid for subsequent breaches. Not retroactive confiscation for breaches that have already been penalised by the courts.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  3rd May 2020

          That was during the investigation stage for the death. It was all dealt with as a crime then.
          It seems to say it was a 360 deg turnaround and he got consultants in to tell him how to run it properly.
          The Worksafe said he was the worst of the worst

          Reply
        • Duker

           /  3rd May 2020

          Confiscation isnt just for a one off… he clearly had been running an unsafe for his employees business for decades. The onus on him to show that he wasnt .

          This was interesting, as it was an Immigration Fraud case..nothing happened yet but could be under way. NZ Herald has a app which checks all Police notices where they restrain a property and that alerts them to check what the names are linked to particular cases

          “Former immigration minister Tuariki Delamere, now an immigration advisor himself, said he “agreed wholeheartedly” with the outcome. He said while Plunkett was limited in the penalties he could impose, he said the police SHOULD use provisions in the Criminal Proceeds Recovery Act to “strip Ryan of his ill-gotten gains”.
          https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/119876127/immigration-advisor-should-be-banned-for-life-says-judge

          Reply
          • Tom Hunter

             /  3rd May 2020

            The onus on him to show that he wasnt .

            Otherwise known as guilty until proven innocent.

            Wow. Between this and a comment from self-admitted 70-year old today over on Pablo’s blog about how he really admires the way the Vietnamese government has dealt with the Wuhan Flu via its “close ties to the military, and also their population’s willingness to dob in their neighbours should they step out of the bounds”, we’re really on the way to pur brave new world.

            The good news is that that same commentator said he was really glad he lived in a democracy, as I’m sure Duker does.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              You dont need to have even been convicted to be caught by Proceeds of Crime Act.
              Have you seen the Serious Fraud Office powers ?
              They have laid CRIMINAL charges over the political donations,

  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  3rd May 2020

    Who would want to run a business in this shithole country?

    The police are the biggest gang in it.

    Reply
    • Blazer

       /  3rd May 2020

      I heard a bloke called Al up Keri Keri way runs multiple businesses.

      He is not known for being consistent in his beliefs.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  3rd May 2020

        Got rich an an app which restaurants take pictures of food they throw out…and yet a Sars vaccine never got funding to bring to the market, which would have helped a lot when a news virus called Sars -2 came a long

        Reply
        • I think that instead of NZ using money and resources on the vaccine we should be pooling our resources with others who are after the same thing.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  3rd May 2020

            It wasnt that NZ could have developed a vaccine on its own …its just the worlds resources have been diverted in the last decade on ‘silly apps’ mostly from Silicon Valley and such

            Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  3rd May 2020

          Believe anything Dukers and Blazer tell you at your own risk. Almost all of it is hilariously wrong.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  3rd May 2020

            ‘almost all’
            Makes good clickbait when its ‘mostly’ true, pity we cant look up divorces

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2020

              God you are a pathetic wanker, Duker. If you could look up divorces the only one you would find would probably be yours – though given your current efforts I doubt if you’d even find that.

            • Duker

               /  3rd May 2020

              Ill tell the Duchess that one

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  3rd May 2020

              Give her my sympathy as well.

    • Gezza

       /  3rd May 2020

      A retired Dutch printer who decided he wanted be his own boss emigrated & established two printing businesses in Welly told me about four years ago that I should start a business. He reckoned that NZ is one of the easiest countries in the world to start a business in.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  3rd May 2020

        It’s easy to start one (little paperwork to register) just hard to make successful and comply with the army of bureaucrats producing ever more rules and costs for you. I’ll be closing them down rather than starting new ones.

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  3rd May 2020

        yes it is easy to start a business in NZ….but hard to make it an ongoing,profitable one.
        Small market.

        Reply
        • I have heard of people from the UK and Europe who appreciate our lack of red tape, comparatively speaking. The mind boggles at what it must be like there, the Circumlocution Department in real life.

          Reply
  7. Alan Wilkinson

     /  3rd May 2020

    If this stands it will be time for the business community to declare war on the police or simply up and leave.

    Reply
    • That will depend on the real story behind the story.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  3rd May 2020

        Alan is going to lead the battle for those employees who kill their employees with gross negligence.

        Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  3rd May 2020

        The only story “behind the story” is that we have state sanctioned favoritism carried out by a police force where companies like Talleys (with solid contributions to the political elite) get of virtually scot free and Ron Salter gets taken for every penny.

        Any goodwill the police have is fast eroding with recent events and the favourtism shown to those sectors supporting the political elite. Many organisations and companies are getting a free run through either lubrication of the need to curry political favours.

        Reply

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