Level 3 laxness

I think that most people were genuinely concerned about Covid-19 and complied fairly well with the restrictions dictated by the Level 4 lockdown. But with a low number of new cases detected for two weeks, the move to Level 3 lockdown seems be treated with a more relaxed attitude by many people.

1 News:  Police report disappointing number of parties, almost 700 Level 3 breaches in just 24 hours

Police issued a strong warning to lockdown rule-breakers today after receiving almost 700 reports of Alert Level 3 breaches within 24 hours.

A huge influx in party-hungry Kiwis resulted in 112 prosecutions from 6pm on Friday to the same time yesterday, authortities said.

Acting assistant police commissioner Scott Fraser called on New Zealanders not to be “complacent”, saying the risky behaviour could “waste all the sacrifices made by our team of five million over the last five weeks”.
Since the beginning of Level 3, around 1200 breaches have been reported around the country, with police acting against almost half the complaints.

So far, 135 people have been prosecuted for breaching Alert Level 3 conditions and a further 342 people received warnings.

1 News: Beachgoers and builders in the firing line amid warning of ‘concerning’ Level 3 breaches

Today Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield issued a warning about the number of “concerning” Level 3 breaches, saying ultimately it could “slow a move to Level 2”.

Police have received 1200 reports about parties and mass gatherings this week, with more than half of those over a 24-hour period this weekend.

At Sumner today, police officers were sweeping the beach in an attempt to move along hundreds of people flocking to soak up the Sunday sun.

While many felt they were obeying Level 3 rules, police today were clear: if you’re not exercising. clear out.
Given the sheer volume of people, social distancing was near impossible.

And even though police set up checkpoints ahead of the teeming suburb, cars kept pouring past.
It follows several days of rule breaking nationwide.

Maybe we can get away with this and Covid will not start to spread again. If it does it may be more localised because travel beyond regions is still quite restricted.

But if too many people get used to ignoring the rules a resurgence in Covid may be harder to contain that the first time if lockdown laxness becomes normalised.

Level 3 is demanding for businesses who have to maintain social distancing, but it’s good practice for hopefully a just a couple of weeks as it may be required again.


Doubts about the legality of restrictions and enforcement, and a light handed approach by the police, may have contributed to the more lax attitudes that seem to be prevailing.

NZ Herald: Legality of police action during covid 19 coronavirus lockdown questioned in legal quarters

Commissioner Andy Coster show a Crown Law opinion warning the police they had little or no power to enforce the lockdown.

That was the case for the first two weeks of the Government orders before the director general of health Ashley Bloomfield used the outdated Health Act to issue specific regulations.

Three days after the lockdown and before the regulations were enacted by Bloomfield, Clement emailed his officers telling them police powers did not extend to road blocks or pulling people over for the purpose of seeing whether they were complying with the lockdown.

The powers only come into play when a breach is obvious.

Clement said they “cannot direct anyone to do anything unless it is quite extreme in its nature and with direct and significant impacts for the health of others”.

While it is good that legal powers are being questioned there is a risk that this will lead to more laxness.

I’d like to drop to Level 2 in a week. I’d be annoyed if that is delayed because to many people decided to do as they please.

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80 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  4th May 2020

    They made too many plainly stupid rules so now people are just going to ignore all of them.

    Reply
    • They (we) may get away with it, we may not. There’s quite a bit of gambling going on.

      I didn’t mind going into Level 4 and complied with all the rules without any problem. I’m sticking to the rules under level 3. I’d like to get to level 2 soon, and would be annoyed if that’s delayed due to too many people pleasing themselves what they do.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th May 2020

        I want to get to Level 2 asap. The Courts haven’t been working (outside of criminal & lockdown matters, it seems) & I can’t sign & have witnessed the necessary legal affidavit to apply to the High Court for probate. Nor can I organise the family get-together at ma’s house that we all want to have. 😕

        Reply
      • Pink David

         /  4th May 2020

        ” There’s quite a bit of gambling going on.”

        You gamble every time you get into a car. What makes this any different?

        Reply
        • Blazer

           /  4th May 2020

          you never compare apples with…apples PD.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  4th May 2020

            “you never compare apples with…apples PD.”

            The risk of death from a car journey is significantly higher than that of death from Covid-19.

            Perhaps you would prefer a comparison with flu? Flu kills far more than Covid-19, yet we do not shut down the economy. Flu kills children, yet we do not shut the schools.

            Covid has almost zero chance of significantly impacting anyone under 65, Flu is killer yet we do not shut workplaces.

            Why?

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  4th May 2020

              they have a vaccine for flu.

            • 248,094 deaths in about two months with rapidly rising infection and death rates until strict restrictions were put in place on most places is one reason.

              If New Zealand was as badly affected as Belgium we could be over 3,000 deaths and still rising by 50-100 per day.

            • Pink David

               /  4th May 2020

              “If New Zealand was as badly affected as Belgium we could be over 3,000 deaths and still rising by 50-100 per day.”

              Everyone in NZ could be dead. When you start with the ‘could be’ where do you stop?

            • Pink David

               /  4th May 2020

              “they have a vaccine for flu.”

              So with a vaccine the flu killed 80,000 in the USA in 2018. How many would it have killed without the vaccine?

              Last year over 3000 died in Australia from flu with a vaccine. How many have died of Covid? Which one do we have a vaccine for?

        • I have successfully avoided injury or illness from getting in a car for quite a few decades. There’s some luck involved of course, but also being sensible and safe helps.

          I have avoided the flu most years, but get colds most years, so I’m well aware of the risks of catching something that’s contagious.

          If nothing was done to try to limit Covid in New Zealand I would have remained relatively safe in my car, especially in the city, but a lot less safe at any public destination and also at private destinations.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  4th May 2020

            “If nothing was done to try to limit Covid in New Zealand I would have remained relatively safe in my car, especially in the city, but a lot less safe at any public destination and also at private destinations.”

            Your risk of death is significantly higher from a car journey than it is from Covid. If you are under 65 your risk from Covid is almost non-existant.

            The risk to children is zero. Why are the schools closed?

            Reply
            • The risk to children is not zero. The risk to me is not ‘almost non-existent’ (unless I stay isolated in my home and supermarkets remain safe).

              Going by what has happened in other countries where Covid has been much more widespread and the death rate has been much higher, if similar had happened here the risks to me would have been far greater than traveling in a car.

            • Pink David

               /  4th May 2020

              “The risk to children is not zero.”

              Yes it is. Flu kills far more children, two weeks ago 7 children in the US died from flu. Why did you not notice? We don’t shut the schools for flu, why is that?

              ” if similar had happened here the risks to me would have been far greater than traveling in a car.”

              This is not true. The risk calculation is based on the death rate seen in the US. If you are under 65, it’s far lower.

            • Risk of death from Covid is certainly much lower for children but it’s not zero.

              Some children in the United Kingdom with no underlying health conditions have died from a rare inflammatory syndrome which researchers believe to be linked to COVID-19, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Tuesday.

              https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-britain-children/uk-says-some-children-have-died-from-syndrome-linked-to-covid-19-idUSKCN22A0XW

              And children pose a risk to other age groups as carriers. A lot of transmittable disease is circulated at and carried from school.

            • The scaremongering and endless hysterical repetition of ‘tens of thousands of deaths !!!’ and even the absurd 80,000 deaths which would mean that more people had it here than live here are appallingly irresponsible. As is the non-reporting in many places of the fact that the 1400+ are the past cases and only 202 actually have it.

              SARS killed twice as many as Covid has here and affected far more. but we didn’t close down for it.

              We were told that handwashing was the best preventative; why, then, did we need to go into nationwide house arrest ?

            • Pink David

               /  4th May 2020

              ‘believe’
              ‘not 100% sure because some of the people who got it hadn’t tested positive’
              ‘it is something that we’re worried about’
              ‘mysterious ‘
              “Actually there’s far too little known about it and the numbers actually at the moment are really too small,”

              This isn’t science.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  4th May 2020

              And children pose a risk to other age groups as carriers

              This seems unclear. I’ve seen reports that no child to adult transmissions have been identified.

            • I’ve seen next to nothing about identified transmission, I think this has been very hard to determine. There are about 90 cases in the Auckland school cluster, but no information on how transmissions occured.

              There was a pupil at Logan Park in Dunedin that had it but that cluster was quickly contained.

              It comes down to what risks are worth taking.

            • Pink David

               /  6th May 2020

              “It comes down to what risks are worth taking.”

              There is no evidence of any risk at all. The only thing there is is fear.

  2. David

     /  4th May 2020

    How exactly is one going to catch Covid if you are outside and there is no community transmission. Hasnt happened on any building site in Australia, hasnt happened in any supermarket can we please stop panicking.

    Reply
    • How do you know it hasn’t happened on any building site or via any supermarket in Australia and New Zealand?

      I haven’t seen any details here of where people have picked up Covid from.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  4th May 2020

        The UK expert committee advised there is no evidence of any outdoor transmission. And there is concern lack of vitamin D results in worse outcomes from infection. So much stupidity, so little responsibility for it to date.

        Reply
      • David

         /  4th May 2020

        Because if it had we would have changed things as would every other country but none has. There has been no report of any case here and if there was the risk must be in a tiny tiny sliver of a percentage risk. Havent seen a single expert panic pants with a PHD looking for a headline warn about shopping.

        Reply
        • Ray Avery: Covid-19 Infection At Supermarket Possible

          Research in Finland conducted in four separate research institutes including Aalto University, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the Finnish Meteorological Institute showed that there is a risk that COVID-19 could be spread in supermarkets due to airborne transmission.

          So is there a real risk that you could get infected by airborne contamination of COVID-19 at the supermarket ? Well maybe, and certainly in any room that contains a large number of people in a confined space like a hospital waiting room or cinema.

          The four key determinants as to the possibility of contracting COVID-19 via airborne contamination are the number of people in the room who are infected, the number of the people in the room per square meter, the number of room fresh air replacements per hour and the types of filters used in the air-conditioning system.

          The good news is that most supermarkets are limiting the number of people into the supermarket at any given time so hopefully the airborne bioaerosol bioburden will be relatively low and your chances of contacting COVID-19 via airborne transmission will, be relatively low.

          https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/HL2004/S00071/covid-19-infection-at-supermarket-possible.htm

          It’s not just an airborne risk, there’s a lot of touching of products in a supermarket.

          Reply
          • Blazer

             /  4th May 2020

            wondered when Sir Raymond would surface.
            Hey when are the incubators to save a million babies arriving Ray?
            Your last update after soliciting 10’s of thousands from donations,was February 2019!…the factory in Chennai was ready to go….what happened Ray….don’t tell me they wanted to be paid….don’t tell me you spent all the…bugs bunny!

            Another true to form…knighted hood.

            Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  4th May 2020

            Yes, precisely. There is an airbourne risk in shops depending entirely on ventilation not in how essential they are. There is little risk from touching things if you handwash.

            Reply
          • Blazer

             /  4th May 2020

            its a question of credibility.
            Do people really want to know what this hustler has to say?

            He has no shame.

            Reply
            • Ok, so maybe everyone can determine who has sufficient credibility to be allowed to comment here.

              I deliberately post views from a range of sources and people, as a part of one of the primary purposes of this blog is to encourage a wide range of views and opinions to be expressed via comments. I allow as much free speech as behaviours allow.

              Those who dump on sources of content and opinion are in effect trying to suppress free speech, showing little or no tolerance for views that differ from their own.

              The only way to limit comment to what you agree with and from people you approve of is to start your own website and to not allow comments.

            • Blazer

               /  4th May 2020

              understood.

        • Supermarkets are an obvious risk but are also an essential soruce of food and household necessities.

          COVID-19 claims lives of 30 grocery store workers, thousands more may have it, union says

          Grocery store workers are on the front lines of the spreading coronavirus epidemic, and thousands have taken off work and some have died after being exposed to the respiratory illness in the U.S., according to a new report.

          At least 30 supermarket employees have died as a result of COVID-19, the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) said in a release on Monday. Another 3,000 have called out of work after showing signs of illness or other possible coronavirus-related complications.

          https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2020/04/14/coronavirus-claims-lives-30-grocery-store-workers-union-says/2987754001/

          Lidl becomes first supermarket chain to CLOSE a UK store after staff catch coronavirus

          Lidl has become the first supermarket chain to close a UK store after some staff members caught coronavirus.

          The German retailer confirmed shop workers had been diagnosed with Covid-19 at the branch in Middlesbrough.

          https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8281995/Lidl-supermarket-chain-CLOSE-UK-store-staff-catch-coronavirus.html

          Reply
          • That’s there, not here.

            We know that there has been almost no community transmission here, all the cases are related except (two ?) so what happens abroad isn’t really relevant to our situation,

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  4th May 2020

              If that’s the case why do you and others constantly compare NZ to other jurisdictions…when it suits…of course.

            • I don’t, as it happens. I say that there’s no point in doing so. I have said that many times.

  3. David

     /  4th May 2020

    700 breaches could be 300 having a crack at Burger Fuel, rightly, and the rest could be minor things like someone going passed a building site and not understanding that you can be closer than 2m if your bubble is a work bubble. You cant place concrete 2m apart for example but you can wear a mask and do it.
    If we had 700 fines then I would be concerned.

    Reply
    • David

       /  4th May 2020

      You will be pleased to hear Blazer that these roosters have an array of employment law breaches against them pending also allegedly from a property manager they are only passing on the government subsidy and not topping up so the landlord is dropping the rent and allegedly you can go to Facebook and could still buy liquor during Level 4.

      Reply
      • Blazer

         /  4th May 2020

        Well bearing in mind the Salter case,you would think these roosters would be prime candidates for asset confiscation under the proceeds of crime regulations.

        Reply
  4. duperez

     /  4th May 2020

    The rules are too hard to follow so we need to get rid of them. I picked that up on TV last night.

    Using that thinking and the freedom of being in lockdown I’ll use the time to contact NZRugby and suggest they get rid of the off side rules. Too many infringements means it’s too hard for ordinary players to abide by. The headlight tackle one too. If someone does suffer it’s someone else so that doesn’t really count.🙃

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  4th May 2020

      As a non-playing, only ever watch the AB Rugby Internationals, type of cove, I find many of Rugby’s rule hard to follow. Now might be a good time to give those the biff too?

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th May 2020

        FiP !
        *rules (ya hit the on-screen ‘s’ key; ya bloody expect an ‘s’ to BE there when you Post Comment! 😠

        Reply
      • duperez

         /  4th May 2020

        Whad’ya reckon eh, get David Seymour in? What chance he’d biff all the rules, the players having the freedom to decide what’s best for themselves? Imagine how free flowing games would be. 😊

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  4th May 2020

          🤔

          Hang on. Just thinking about this … what happens when any time a player gets the ball he is expected to look at all the other players, even those from another supplier, & and their advantages & disadvantages, & to make a choice who next gets the ball, most likely on the basis of their price? 😳

          Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  4th May 2020

      No dups, some of the rules are too stupid to follow and always have been.

      Reply
  5. Reply
    • I think that if she punishes us as if we were naughty children, she will be extremely unpopular. And it will lead to many more breaches. People’s patience is wearing thin.

      Reply
    • David

       /  4th May 2020

      She is getting quite tiresome, losing a bit of love from the younger persons now as their mates lose their jobs.

      Reply
      • She sounds like a teacher threatening to keep the whole class in because of a few naughty kids. ‘Letting the team down.’ ‘Seeing the whole country punished…’ It seems as if she’s looking for an excuse to keep us all under control.

        Being a ‘team’ was forced on us, it wasn’t our choice.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th May 2020

        I think the younger ladies lap it up but the guys are getting a bit sick of it.

        Reply
  6. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern outlines level 3 departure

    Ardern, in a series of Monday morning interviews, said Cabinet will decide whether the country will leave alert level 3 on Monday, May 11, and if the decision is made, there will be 48 hours to prepare.

    “We’ve always made the decisions on the Monday so they can take effect on a Wednesday,” Ardern said on Newstalk ZB.
    Ardern said a move to alert level 2 — which will allow all businesses and public facilities to open with a 1-metre social distance maintained — would be determined by the number of Covid-19 cases, and the “preparedness” of all aspects of the health response.

    “Really specifically though for levels 3 and 2, what we want to look at is: ‘Do we have cases where we can’t tell where they’ve come from?’ Because that’s an indication of potential community transmission.”

    “If we cannot conclude that, and we have too many of those cases, then that’s cause for concern.”

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/300003713/coronavirus-prime-minister-jacinda-ardern-outlines-level-3-departure?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

    Reply
    • But we don’t have those cases, do we ? It’s a non-issue. One can’t catch anything from people who don’t have it.

      Potential community transmission could be used as a weapon to justify what would be more or less a police state.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  4th May 2020

        That was a quick epidemiology course you have completed…. bravo for getting a pass, your diploma will be in the next weetbix box

        Reply
  7. Duker

     /  4th May 2020

    Still running that hoary old story about “police powers’, Soper is beating that drum again.
    The point they make is that its not within existing police powers to stop people etc , we understand that.
    But what has happened is that Epidemic Provsions of the Health Act AND the National State of emergency do allow CONSTABLES to do so as a sort of delegation from health officers and emergency management officials.

    So lets leave what Police can and cant do as part of their NORMAL powers on the shelf , as we get that .
    Soper just doing a beat up using sophistry
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12329263
    “Clement emailed his officers telling them police powers did not extend to road blocks or pulling people over for the purpose of seeing whether they were complying with the lockdown.”
    Yes yes yes . As delegated health officers Constables could then do so. Its so bleeding obvious and says so in Health Act

    71A Power of constables to assist medical officer of health in relation to infectious diseases
    (1)A constable may do any thing reasonably necessary (including the use of force)
    (a)to help a medical officer of health or any person authorised by a medical officer of health in the exercise or performance of powers or functions under section 70 or 71; or…

    No wonder the laxness has increased when every fool is saying ‘its not legal’

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  4th May 2020

      I’m sure their honours will be coming to you for legal guidance should any awkward cases make it to the courtrooms. Drawing on your extensive knowlege of the law after years of googling.

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  4th May 2020

        “She told police the lockdown was “a joke” after a car accident while on her way to go four-wheel-driving with friends.
        Jessie Allison Dredge, 20,​ was charged with obstructing a medical officer of health and sentenced to 80 hours community work in the Nelson District Court on Monday. ”
        As I was saying the police are excising powers given to them under the Health Act…as constables who are authorised ‘medical officers of health’

        Every judge has access to a vast law Library , indeed lawyers can consult acts and decisions online today …while you still have ancient methods ..I can look up acts and decisions online …who knew.
        I just like to give my informed opinions from a basis of actual events and stand on the shoulders of giants…

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  4th May 2020

          Every judge has access to a vast law Library , indeed lawyers can consult acts and decisions online today …while you still have ancient methods ..I can look up acts and decisions online …who knew.

          I’ve got two laptops, an iPad & a smartphone. I can & do google judicial decisions & legislation & I post the results here when I feel they’re especially salient. Why you alone would think that I only have “ancient methods” is beyond me. It might be another bizarre blind spot caused somehow by your continued antipathy towards me or it may even perhaps be that your brain is somehow wired wrong.

          I’ll just have to continue my observations until I can think of a way to help you improve your self-awareness.

          Reply
  8. Alan Wilkinson

     /  4th May 2020

    I sense the mood is shifting from fear to anger. Expect Govt’s ratings to slide now. Jacinda’s had it as good as it’s going to get. The future is all about bankruptcies, unemployment and budget deficits..

    Reply
    • I don’t sense a shift to anger.

      There’s been no sign of anger from the people I have been in close contact with through the lockdown (a number of family bubbles). I don’t sense it in the local news.

      I do see anger online in social media, but I don’t think much if any more than usual, it’s just that the target of the anger has changed a little.

      I see quite a bit of anger in Kiwiblog comments, directed mainly at Jacinda Ardern’s handling of the Covid-10 pandemic, but that’s just switched from anger over her handling of the mosque massacre, or her handling of her public relations, or her handling of her ministers, or her handling of her family. It’s just griping as usual, the only difference is the excuse.

      It’s also easy to see angry comments on Facebook and Twitter, but again that’s not unusual, the griping is at similar levels just with something slightly different to gripe about.

      Actually the main impression I get is that many people are looking more relaxed.

      I think many of them may also be quite relived, as they glance at the US, UK and Europe and see what could have happened here if a different approach was taken.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  4th May 2020

        Business owners are not feeling relieved. The mood the MSM reflects is changing from docile to critical.

        Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  4th May 2020

        The problem will be (as Blazer point out below) in June when business has had a chance to measure customer flow and spend in the various lock down stages. If the trafic flow of customers and their confidence is down and spending stops, business will drop staffing numbers about that time.

        Expect a drop in employees when business realises it is more convenient to employ contract only labour rather than full time employees.

        There is a great deal of anger in business regarding the anomalies in the lock down rules. The government has picked favourites and made them strong whilst the smaller operators are facing continued restrictions.

        Mind you here in South Auckland, many small businesses are not waiting for approval to open, they just have and many without the “one in one out” protection. Local laundromat was 100% full at the weekend (it was raining). Local greengrocer (hip hip hooray) is also open and getting plenty of supplies from uninhibited growers.

        Problem is so wide spread that Counties Manukau region has the largest count in regards the flaunting the lock down rules. Police (and their representatives) shut one and another simply opens, The shut one opens again within the hour.

        I guess Dunedin is more restraint?

        Reply
        • There’s certainly major challenges for businesses (and the Government and health services and schools and communities) in the next few months, and likely until the end of the year at least. Longer than that for some businesses, particularly airlines, travel and tourism related.

          Letting Covid loose again is the least preferred option. What will happen wil be a difficult balancing act that is certain to turn out to be imperfect in various ways, but hopefully the consequences will be less bad than the alternative.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  4th May 2020

            The Government claimed to be following the science when it wasn’t and claimed to be following the law when it wasn’t.

            It won’t be forgiven.

            Reply
            • Pink David

               /  4th May 2020

              It’s not following the science, it’s following the public mood.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  4th May 2020

              Yes, plus its own Lefty “control freak” ideology.

            • Gezza

               /  4th May 2020

              @ Pinky

              It’s not following the public mood, it’s been shaping it.

    • Blazer

       /  4th May 2020

      it will be late June that things blow up for the Govt.
      Wage subsidy lasts until June 17 as you know.

      Reply
  9. Pink David

     /  4th May 2020

    An interesting comment on UK deaths by UK’s Chief Scientific Officer, Sir Patrick Valance;

    “It is worth remembering again that the ONS rates are people who’ve got COVID on their death certificates. It doesn’t mean they were necessarily infected because many of them haven’t been tested. So we just need to understand the difference.””

    Remember where the media highlight this important caveat when they quoted the numbers from the UK?

    Reply
  10. Gezza

     /  4th May 2020

    Drove up to me local Indian-owned dairy to get 2L of fresh light blue top milk & a $2 bag of jet planes (for being a good boy today).

    There was a woman customer inside getting something while her young boy waited outside, & a teenager waiting on the pavement, head down engrossed in his smartphone. Another chap came up on the other side before I could join the small queue, & said youth waved him in as he was busy on his mobile.

    No probs there; he was slightly ahead of me, timewise & he was in & out in a minute.

    Before the youth could wave me in as well, a strapping, young, bearded fella wot looked lime The Hulk’s younger bruvver strolled across the road & straight in to the shop, ahead of me ❗️ 😮

    “What would Corky do?” I thought.

    “Right!”, I quickly decided. I swung me bonce around the doorway & “Hey mate! You’re queue-jumping!”, I sung out, getting ready to win by dozens of metres if this went pear-shaped.

    “Oop – is there a queue?” sez he.
    “Yep, & I’m next!”
    “Aww, sorry mate”, he says, coming out. “Are you only allowed one person in here at a time”.

    “Yep, that’s the rule with all of them”, I said. The doorway both sides has prominent, short-worded clear signs. I decided he must be illiterate.

    I thanked him for coming out again when I exited the shop after a successful execution of my mission. “All yours now”, I smiled at him, & he gave me a grin & a thumbs up.

    Reply
    • Conspiratoor

       /  4th May 2020

      That’s not the Corky I know G. He’d have him on the ground in a full nelson sleeper hold while Brutus the pitbull gnawed contentedly on his throat

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  4th May 2020

        Yes, of course, c. But I, being of a higher moral & ethical character & cursed with an oversupply of EI, take pity on the afflicted such as this poor beast, and allow them the chance to redeem themselves or be outrun.

        Reply
      • And then he’d wake up…yes, it was only a dream…

        Reply
      • Duker

         /  4th May 2020

        “That’s not the Corky I know G”
        Yes , things can get pretty tough in the Catering Corps….
        like in Navy its not the Gunners who are the brutes but the Stokers

        Reply
        • C & G, you forgot the sudden appearance of vast numbers of fighting gang members, followed by the police in Armed Offenders get-up….Corky takes off on his Harley…

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  4th May 2020

            A master of the strategic withdrawal in order to continue reconnaissance.

            Reply

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