New Zealand situation looks promising as life returns to some normality

New Zealanders have enjoyed getting out and about more under the far less restrictive Level 2, and our Covid stats look very promising for now.

There are just 45 active cases in the country.

Most parts of the country have had no new cases of Covid for some time. The Southern DHB (Otago and Southland) had the most cases a month ago but have had no new cases for 4 weeks – that’s regarded as two full cycles of the virus. There is just one remaining active case.

Total cases by DHB, as at 9.00 am, 17 May 2020
DHB Active Recovered Deceased Total Change in last 24 hours
Auckland 4 174 178 0
Bay of Plenty 0 47 47 0
Canterbury 6 146 12 164 1
Capital and Coast 0 93 2 95 0
Counties Manukau 3 124 127 0
Hawke’s Bay 5 39 44 0
Hutt Valley 0 20 20 0
Lakes 0 16 16 0
Mid Central 1 31 32 0
Nelson Marlborough 1 48 49 0
Northland 0 28 28 0
South Canterbury 0 17 17 0
Southern 1 213 2 216 0
Tairāwhiti 0 4 4 0
Taranaki 0 16 16 0
Waikato 6 181 1 188 0
Wairarapa 0 8 8 0
Waitematā 18 215 3 236 0
West Coast 0 4 1 5 0
Whanganui 0 9 9 0
Total 45 1,433 21 1,499 1

This looks very promising for getting our lives back to normal within the country, but international travel looks a long way off. Limited border easing, for example to Australia, has been suggested but doesn’t look like happening soon.

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21 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  18th May 2020

    Yes the comparison with Australia is that now we seem to have less restrictions than some states as we have improved outlook
    When NZ confirmed cases per mill is compared to Australia by state . Victoria, Queensland and WA are better, we are roughly the same as SA and well behind NSW.

    https://castalia-advisors.com/comparing-the-new-zealand-and-australian-states-responses-to-covid-19/

    Reply
  2. Gezza

     /  18th May 2020

    I’ve just got a good feeling about NZ’s recovery, for some reason. I feel like it’s going to come faster & more smoothly than the economists & doom n gloomers are portending.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  18th May 2020

      Thats the feeling I get too, of course the tourism sector is stuffed but who knows Kiwis and a bit later Australians could push that along. And we wont miss the freedom campers and the quickie tourists from China

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th May 2020

        I’m hopeful that various Coalition incentives to get young Maori rangatahi into trades & related construction training are going to see many of them take up these options to create a better future for themselves & their whanau this time round.

        A couple of short interviews with existing Maori trainees shown on 1News post-the-budget-announcement, & some similar interviews seen months prior to that, while only anecdotal & probably deliberately hunted around for by TVNZ, are good advertising. And Maori housing & housing maintenance needs are always reported as in dire need of addressing. Having their own young folk able to fill those needs will be a real win-win for everyone.

        While I think people are busting to come out of lockdown, my impression is also that, just from talking to folk in supermarket queues, people everywhere & in all walks of life are raring to go, to get earning, to get the country moving back into the black & to do their bit for themselves & the country as soon as possible.

        If that’s really typical of how most of the population feel, whoever ends up in government can ride that wave.

        The key issue will be how quickly people who’ve been blindsided & debt-burdened by job losses or business closures can be encouraged & get the opportunities to get it all back again. That’s where Grant hanging on to $2b – if wisely spent – will probably come in.

        My feeling is that most folk aren’t going to be interested in debates, and carping pollie criticism, over whether we should have locked down at all, & how slow we were to cut the virus off at the border & quarantine at the outset.

        We are where we are thru taking action like the rest of the world did; now we want to just get on with with it – onward & upward.

        Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  18th May 2020

      It’s going to depend on how many businesses fold on top of the loss of tourism, international students, Chinese trade and foreign workers.

      I just heard another family member is impacted by a business closure – ironically one that was designated essential during lockdown. And local shops have lost a lot of business to supermarket deliveries during the lockdown that may never be recovered.

      The relief at lockdown ending is natural but reality probably has a big stick waiting for us. Most businesses probably operate on a tiny margin of profit and a hit of the order of 25% of turnover is likely to be fatal.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th May 2020

        Yes there’s going to need to be a campaign to get people to actually visit & spend in their local businesses.

        I have been wondering myself how many people who’ve not bothered with online shopping much before have now become fans, attracted by its convenience.

        But then, it’s pretty clear people are also champing at the bit to get out & about & into the cities, towns, & local villages too.

        I find physically shopping for some items – where you can actually can see, touch, feel & handle and compare products, preferable to online shopping. It’s just a pain that you can still end up queueing at this stage of level 2 because only limited numbers are allowed inside at the same time.

        Gardening, tools, clothing, shoes, some DIY products, etc, for me anyway. And when one is out & about doing that, one is also liable to spot something else one needs when passing a shop, & the exposure to the delectable smells of eateries can lure one into eating out when not originally intended as well.

        I reckon we’ll come right pretty fast. The people who lost jobs they love, & businesses they own, aren’t going to be the kind of people who’ll be wanting to sit on their arse with their hands out to the government, Al.

        They’ll be go-getters.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  18th May 2020

          But their ex-employees won’t be, G.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  18th May 2020

            A lot of them probably will be, Al, imo. They’ll most likely job hunt. If they’ve got in for their previous employer for letting them go, they’ll work for someone else.

            Reply
    • David

       /  18th May 2020

      Early signs are good Gezza, could be a relief rally.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  18th May 2020

        Yes, I noticed you were commenting the other day on that being your experience already.

        Reply
        • Online’s excellent for things that you don’t need to see, I must say. The delivery charges are usually minimal and it’s blimmin convenient. But not for shoes or most clothes, I like to see and try them on.

          I must confess to succumbing to temptation and buying another handbag today.

          The signing in seems to be causing confusion I had to at an opshop and a cafe, but not at the handbag shop. Other shops didn’t appear to have it.

          A hairdresser that I passed had the staff in masks and gloves. A few people are still in masks, but some don’t seem to realise that not covering the nose makes them of even less use than they are anyway.

          Reply
  3. NOEL

     /  18th May 2020

    Where is Tassie. They remain in lockdown.

    Reply
  4. Alan Wilkinson

     /  18th May 2020
    Reply
    • Duker

       /  18th May 2020

      Jones , in his laugh a minute – not to be taken seriously didnt he say – columns , says reading has been his main preoccupation in life. Right
      AS for Buffett, I see recently he was ditching his airline stocks after buying failry recently when they were doing well. Its amazing how many investment gurus break their own advice about buying low selling high , hold long term and so on.
      Some wise words I saw recently said , in general the stockbroking industry is of low calibre for various reasons , so no need to take seriously their advice.
      However the ones to watch is those in the credit industry as its mostly their money at risk and they cant use tired old nostrums to give themselves guidelines for future behaviour.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  18th May 2020

        You have an endless supply of arrogant b.s., Duker. Impressive.

        Reply
  5. Alan Wilkinson

     /  18th May 2020

    Away from the professional work-from-home and government job security, life is tough:
    https://i.stuff.co.nz/national/education/121526382

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  18th May 2020

      Well at least the kids will be safe at school

      https://play.stuff.co.nz/details/_6157275123001

      & the hungry ones can probably get a feed there.

      Don’t be such a pessisimist.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  18th May 2020

        When they don’t have a job any more, optimists soon become pessimists.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  18th May 2020

          So sad to learn you have lost your income

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  18th May 2020

            Jacinda will be saying that a lot until the election, Duker.

            Reply
            • There seem to have been a lot of people who were almost destitute during lockdown; no job and no WINZ payments yet. These people were going hungry because the rent still had to be paid. It makes for appalling reading, Jacinda has a lot to answer for.

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