Open Forum Sunday

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110 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  24th May 2020

    They featured a short video of an interview of Todd Muller on 1New at 6 last night. Was interested in his answer to the female reporter’s question whether his Catholic faith was likely to inform his policiy positions (more or less). Differentiating between them, he said it only informs his heart.

    His office was already packed up in boxes, ready to move into the leader’s lair. Said nice things about Simon. He’s taken over the Small Buiness spkesperson portfolio & says that’s going to be his focus. They are most in need of looking after.

    It wasn’t yet clear to the reporter whether Paula Bennett will remain as National’s campaign manager.

    He was very relaxed. A clear communicator; seems frank, diplomatic, transparent, smart, & honest. Man with a Mission. Good move by National. Watch his space.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Drat. Lying down. FiP2 down at me knees. 😐

      *Small Business spokesperson

      Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th May 2020

      “A clear communicator; seems frank, diplomatic, transparent, smart, & honest. Man with a Mission. Good move by National.”
      Ahh the penney has dropped , when a national leader is a communicator its good , when a labour leader does it , its bad.
      Yep , your core Tory beliefs are totally obvious , no need for the facade
      The other point , which Im sure isnt obvious to you, is that identity politics is at work , you identify with an older male, balding and it all sounds good. Younger, woman, labour sounds bad.
      yes of course you claim its all based on reason and rational thought . Research says it varys from 80-95% emotion no matter how rational you claim

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        Yep , your core Tory beliefs are totally obvious , no need for the facade

        Still getting it wrong. Christ. You’re definitely the world’s worst mind- reader. No wonder clinical psychologists find it virtually impossible to do any useful work with people with zero EI like you.

        yes of course you claim its all based on reason and rational thought . Research says it varys from 80-95% emotion no matter how rational you claim

        I’ve NEVER made such a claim. I already know how much emotion informs the average voter. I know who to weigh & balance the emotional & intellectual evaluation process & am always aware of which I am allowing to dominate.

        You’ll never figure me out. You don’t have the intello-emotional equipment necessary to get into my head. Or anybody’s, from what I’ve seen. Stop chronically making a jerk of yourself.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th May 2020

          Fk. Html fail – para 3, if you’re around, PG? There’s a missed space before the slash.

          * I know HOW to weigh & balance…

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  24th May 2020

            Of course …..you are [deleted] than all the rest ..reasoning and logic…yeah right.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              Yawn. Never voted National or ACT in my life. Don’t know how I’ll vote yet.

              [deleted]

            • Duker

               /  24th May 2020

              I said you politically are [deleted] ….

              And the moderator, to be fair to all, needs to start deleting some of your abusive terms…. rather than seeing commenting as a privilege like the rest of us theres [deleted] abuse and condescension

            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              Don’t make me laugh. The whole point of your continual ad homs & put downs is to generate a retaliatory response & then cry & complain to the moderator.

            • Duker

               /  24th May 2020

              Retaliatory ? I live in hope of the mute button from you. Who even just says “wot” with no sign of the brain I know you have.
              Whatever the level the bar is set for pejoratives Im happy to live within them as always, commenting is a privilege ( the wider readership deserves it)

            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              You get wot when you post yet another a whatabout or a squirrel that has nothing to do with the issue or the individual under discussion.

              You won’t have noticed that because you do that so often you may not even realise you’re at it again.

              You also sometimes are just a tedious regurgitator. Not interested in that. Mostly I just ignore them. You might do well to adopt the same approach instead of starting petty vendettas when your ego gets a dent.

  2. Gezza

     /  24th May 2020

    Stuff’s front page teaser headline

    Horror week for redundancies
    5:15 AM New Zealanders warned that a ‘trickle’ is set to turn into a ‘torrent’.

    for this piece looking at Muller’s new focus area.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/300018489/redundant-worker-asks-what-am-i-if-i-dont-have-my-job

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Within:

      “The big headline number is the tip of the iceberg,” Infometrics chief forecaster Gareth Kiernan said.

      “What we don’t read about is the small businesses where the number is nowhere near as exciting as Air New Zealand or Fletchers.”

      A tally of the reported redundancies so far had already topped 10,000, he said.

      There was likely to be more pain ahead when the businesses who had been getting the wage subsidy had that money run out. At the moment, the wage subsidy is supporting nearly 60 per cent of the New Zealand labour force.

      Many businesses would find they no longer had the customer base they had before the lockdown and would need to downsize to meet the new market.

      The extension of the wage subsidy to the hardest hit firms would buy a few more months but then there would be another wave, he said.

      The Employers and Manufacturers Association (EMA) has reported a surge in inquiries about restructuring and redundancy processes.

      Shortcomings in the government’s response identified – but remember there’s still $20b Grant’s parking his derrière on, pending further response need evaluation. Which is a smart move

      Reply
      • David

         /  24th May 2020

        Outside of tourism I dont see much of a downturn. I think Ardern is taking a stupid risk with keeping us at Level 2.7 which is a costly and unnecessary impost, either her government has spent the last 9 weeks forming a very efficient track test and trace system or they havent.

        I went to the counter and ordered a coffee and picked up the coffee from the same counter and sat in a cafe on Saturday morning and on Saturday afternoon I had to sign in and sit in a spaced out bar and wait for someone to get me drink. The rules make no sense in a country with pretty much zero cases and Muller has a good opportunity here to go into bat for the hospo industry.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  24th May 2020

          “Hospo” industry is where super spreaders can thrive- Matamata bar had 45 cases from ONE evening. Wedding venue had 90 cases from ONE evening.

          Reply
  3. NOEL

     /  24th May 2020

    Good communicator!
    Colllins said the PM was one of those and Simon not.
    Bet there are no comments from the right if he work ed in a fish and chip shop at some point.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Doesn’t matter. There’ll be plenty of sniping from the left about whatever work he’s done & how bad for country he’d be as PM because [make up some ‘crime’].

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  24th May 2020

        Student politician…check …studied politics at Masters level (MSocSc at that lefty Waikato)…check…worked at the family
        business kiwifruit packhouse…. yeah business maestro

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th May 2020

          And Ardern ?

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  24th May 2020

            Left one out …. worked in politics after university ..check.
            These are all things that are bad when labour does it …according to Tories

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              Make no difference to me. Not a Tory.

              But you seem to have left some other reported work experience of his out. Why?

  4. lurcher1948

     /  24th May 2020

    Thank god we have PM Jacinda Ardern looking after all New Zealanders,it seems Mr Muller is going to only look after small business,Jacinda has your back NZ

    Reply
    • lurcher1948

       /  24th May 2020

      Morning downticker 😀,do you feel better now.

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      No he said that’s his focus; nobody except probably Twyford or Clark would be silly enuf to limit their policies to ONLY small business. But you can bet some will try to portray that as something akin to “criminal negligence” of the rest of the population.

      Ardern is up against someone with a few clues now, neighbour.

      But, always happy to help someone in need; here

      Reply
  5. David

     /  24th May 2020

    Great news from the government and they are stopping having to get a building permit on more minor works, National started this but didnt go nearly far enough.
    I was going to put up a carport and the council fees were going to be in excess of 3k now I can get my licenced building practitioner to build it without bothering the council. You can build a 30sqm sleepout or shed without crossing the councils palms with silver. Well done Jenny Salsea.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Credit where credit is due. I like that. You’re not politically tribal either, are you.

      If I do some posts as offered yesterday, I won’t try & cover what’s wrong with the RMA, what needs to be done, why we obviously NEED some regulations around building requirements, what they should be. I don’t have any experience of running up against it.

      But you – your comments around it are usually intelligent & intelligible, measured, you have detailed experience of it, & you write well. Would you consider knocking up a think piece guest post?

      Reply
      • David

         /  24th May 2020

        I would.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th May 2020

          Great. I want to understand it – and you’re an excellent communicator, able to relate the issues tonpractical experience. I really look forward to seeing one asap. I’m sick of being befuddled by it.

          Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th May 2020

      Builders always add their margin to council costs , inflating the actual amount. yes the council bureaucrats have too many incompetents and control freaks …maybe because I dealt with a much higher level with my work I saw some of the better ones.

      Reply
      • David

         /  24th May 2020

        Wouldnt ask a builder to submit plans its more efficient to use a designer/draughstman who do it for a living as you are less likely to have it coming back with questions at $160 an hour in council time.
        I have a friend building a quite big house and he is 3/4 of the way through and so far has paid 56k in council fees, he is using an architect and he is a project manager.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  24th May 2020

          I was thinking small projects , garages , swimming pools – these are notorious for the pool company inflating the council charges

          You would know ‘council fees’ cover a huge range from application costs including the basic inspector visits. if you have a difficult site geotech costs can climb and council can ask for peer review.
          The biggie which isnt really council fees but is lumped in with it is ‘development charges’ where you pay for existing parks libraries, stormwater/sewage , maybe roads even.
          A new power ‘connection’ is $15k to cover use of existing/ upgrades to the local network with physical connection charges only a small amount ( for a standard connection)

          Reply
          • David

             /  24th May 2020

            Power is $600 or so bucks to connect to an independent company and water is around the same. It was an existing section so development contributions were already paid.
            The 56k is just council fees for approving the plans and inspections, it is on a hill so there is a fair bit of engineering. Generally building on the flat with a standard house will cost around 35K in council fees.

            Reply
          • Try moving a house. The things they want to know are eye-watering and I would think impossible to answer. We decided that it wasn’t worth bothering.

            Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  24th May 2020

      Fantastic. Got a link to the detail?

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      PS: Jenny Salesa. You’ve reminded me, David. Seen Jenny in a couple of short TV items about matters to do with her porfolios – including construction training – & thought she stood out from some of her more senior colleague disappointments as having a good grasp of the issues & being a very good communicator. Underrated, perhaps. Seems capable & focussed on matters beyond ethnic affairs.

      Reply
  6. David

     /  24th May 2020

    It began in January as a “little lab project”, soon after a curious new disease emerged in China.

    Little more than four months later, the eyes of the nation – and perhaps the world – are firmly upon Professor Adrian Hill and his team at Oxford University.

    This week, the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca announced a $1.2 billion deal with the US government to produce 400 million doses of the unproven coronavirus vaccine first produced in Prof Hill’s small Oxford lab.

    Meanwhile, the British Government has agreed to pay for up to 100 million doses, adding that 30 million may be ready for UK citizens by September.

    The stakes could hardly be higher. If proven effective, the ZD1222 vaccine would allow people to leave their homes, go back to work, and rebuild the economy.

    But Prof Hill, director of the university’s Jenner Institute, revealed that his team now faces a major problem, throwing the September deadline into doubt.

    In short, their adversary is disappearing so rapidly in the UK that the next phase of trials has only a 50 per cent chance of success.

    Without Covid-19 spreading in the community, volunteers will not catch the disease, leaving scientists unable to prove that their vaccine makes any difference.

    Prof Hill said that of 10,000 people recruited to test the vaccine in the coming weeks – some of whom will be given a placebo – he expected fewer than 50 people to catch the virus. If fewer than 20 test positive, then the results may be useless, he warned.

    “It is a race, yes. But it’s not a race against the other guys. It’s a race against the virus disappearing, and against time,” Prof Hill, 61, told the Telegraph from his university laboratory, long emptied by the lockdown.

    “We said earlier in the year that there was an 80 per cent chance of developing an effective vaccine by September.

    “But at the moment, there’s a 50 per cent chance that we get no result at all.

    “We’re in the bizarre position of wanting Covid to stay, at least for a little while. But cases are declining.”

    At the Downing Street press conference on May 17, Business Secretary Alok Sharma suggested half the UK population could be given the jab this autumn, should it prove effective.

    But Prof Hill said success was far from guaranteed, and warned against “over-promising”.

    “I wouldn’t book a holiday in October on the back of these announcements, put it that way,” he said.

    “The number keeps going up. Thirty million doses is quite hard, and one hundred million is harder still by September. Remember, even if we get a result in August, we can’t start vaccinating everyone the next day.”

    “There’s a danger of over-promising here. This is the way I usually say it: this is our ambition. There are multiple risks. It’s never been done before. We don’t know if we can do it. We think we can.

    “You know, mistakes happen. Accidents happen in cooking as well. That needs to be understood.”

    Early next month, Oxford will release the crucial results of a first trial of more than 1,000 UK volunteers conducted in April, when the disease was at its peak.

    “The first trial is going fine. We’re still in business, I can tell you that,” Professor Hill said.

    “But we’re not going to do what others have done – say we’ve got something good, but we’re not showing you yet. That’s just bonkers. You either disclose your results or you don’t.”

    Around the world, eight potential Covid-19 vaccines have gone to human trials: four in China, two in the US, and one in Germany. Many of those teams – including Oxford – are planning to move their next trials to Covid-19 hotspots overseas, but that will take time.

    “You think we’ve got a problem?” Prof Hill said. “What would you do if you were in China? There are three Chinese companies looking for phase three and there’s no Covid in China. So what do they do?”

    Prof Hill and his team had a strong head start on their rivals. Most of the other scientists searching for a vaccine across the world have been forced to hold small clinical trials to prove their treatment is safe. But the Jenner Institute already had a vaccine tested against an earlier coronavirus, which was proven as harmless to humans.

    The technique grew from Prof Hill’s search for a vaccine to combat malaria, a scourge he first witnessed in the 1980s while visiting a priest uncle in war-torn Zimbabwe.

    Over the past two decades, the Jenner Institute learned how to alter the genetic code of a familiar virus, first to neutralise its harmful effects, and then to make it imitate a deadlier disease. Injected into the bloodstream, the harmless virus can induce the body to produce an immune response, providing long-lasting protection.

    Prof Hill’s long search for a viable malaria vaccine has so far been fruitless, despite more than 70 clinical trials. But last year, his colleague Professor Sarah Gilbert modified the same chimpanzee virus to vaccinate against MERS, a coronavirus, which then passed human trials in the UK.

    When Covid-19 began to spread, Prof Gilbert decided to do a “little lab project” to see whether the Oxford technique could work on the new disease. Tests were promising, and in April six rhesus macaque monkeys were given single doses of the Oxford vaccine at a US lab, and were then exposed to the virus. A month later, all six monkeys were still healthy.

    If the next phase of human trials is a success, the Government has pledged that “people in the UK will get the first access, helping to protect thousands of lives”.

    Next in line will be the US government, which has secured 300m doses to protect its own citizens, under Donald Trump’s so-called ‘Warp Speed’ programme.

    But Prof Hill said Oxford University had secured “hardwired” assurances against so-called ‘vaccine nationalism’ – the prioritisation of treatment toward rich Western nations at the expense of others.

    “The reputational damage to the university would be enormous if we provided the vaccine only for the UK and US and not for the rest of those countries of the world where it’s very likely the pandemic would still be raging,” he said.

    “I’ve been thinking about it day and night for weeks. We care about Africa. We know the people there. We know there’s going to be a significant problem at some stage. Brazil looks terrible and India is getting there fast.

    “The vaccine should be supplied to the countries of greatest need at the moment that it works, rather than the countries who got there first. And that will happen.”

    A deal has already been signed with the Serum Institute of India, the world’s largest vaccine producer.

    If the Oxford vaccine works, Prof Hill said he would be happy for other countries to use his research principles to protect their own citizens.

    “We might feel a little peculiar about that. We got there first, but everyone else piles in. We might feel that we’ve done the heavy lifting.

    “But actually we wouldn’t care. We’re not competing in a cutthroat way. If someone else can produce a billion doses, we’ll have a party.”

    Despite the billion dollar price tag, Oxford will not be making vast amounts of money from the breakthrough, Prof Hills insisted.

    “Simple arithmetic will tell you that there’s no money being made by the university. It’s pretty amazing that it can be manufactured at that selling price. We’re coming clean and saying: during the pandemic, we will not make money.”

    Until last week, the Oxford vaccine was considered the clear frontrunner in the global race. Last week, however, a widely-reported article in Forbes cast doubt on the results of the monkey trial, suggesting that results actually showed the vaccine did not prevent the animals from catching or spreading the virus because traces were found in the creatures’ noses.

    Prof Hill said the article was misleading because the monkeys had been deliberately “overdosed” on coronavirus in order to test for safety.

    “The honest truth, I think, is that the author is a long-retired senior Harvard virologist, infectious disease guy. He’s not a vaccine developer,” he said.

    “We used a really high dose and these guys gave it not just into the lungs and the nose. They gave it into the mouth, and they gave it into the eyes. They gave a huge dose. I mean, seriously, it’s that level of basic.”

    Even so, Prof Hills accepts the chances of success still hang firmly in the balance.

    “The US government, the UK government, loads of charities and philanthropists are all saying we’ll pay to have it manufactured, before you finish the trial. I mean, it’s a huge kind of vote of confidence in what we’re doing. It’s really flattering,” he said.

    “But that doesn’t guarantee the result. It could be nothing or could be great or somewhere in between.

    “We’re conflicted. We believe in our technology, and I suppose we’re more likely to overestimate than underestimate.

    “We try to be as objective as we can, but we spent 16 years developing this technology. If it suddenly looks like it might be useful to the whole world, you really want it to work.”

    Global Health Bulletin
    Get the latest coronavirus news and advice as the outbreak continues

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th May 2020

      Very good points . The how of a vaccine needs to be for all not restricted by IP.

      India is now a centre of pharma manufacturing but NZ found out the hard way when India closed its borders to exports of generic anti depressants
      There is some very voracious drug companies out there
      “A Drug Company Wagers the U.S. Won’t Dare Charge It With Crimes
      Teva, the world’s largest maker of generic drugs, recently pulled out of settlement talks with the Justice Department.”

      Reply
  7. Pink David

     /  24th May 2020

    Jan Bolsonaro is a great leader. Sanding firm against the tyranny so many have rushed to impose on their people because of a minor virus.

    Reply
    • Alan Foster

       /  24th May 2020

      Only 1,000 a day dying in Brazil I see – great leadership eh?

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  24th May 2020

        Care to show how a lockdown would have not resulted in far more deaths?

        Reply
        • Alan Foster

           /  24th May 2020

          Care to show how it wouldn’t.
          Compare Sweden with Norway – Sweden has 9 times the death rate per capita.
          Explain that one.

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  24th May 2020

            Why pick only that suit you? How about we pick Japan and Belgium? All around the Pacific rim there is very little impact from Covid, regardless of lockdowns or not. In the US it is mostly in NY. When you look at the wider picture there is no relationship between lockdowns and numbers of Covid deaths. None.

            Places with the most death are all in lockdown. Places that have stopped their lockdowns have seen the infection rates drop, not increase.

            The 2nd wave stories are just that, stories.

            If the lockdowns worked, care to explain why NZ has more deaths than Australia? Business carried on to a large degree in Australia, so why is that not reflected in more deaths?

            There is zero evidence lockdowns have done anything to slow or stop the virus. Zero. Everyone says follow the science, where is your science?

            He is the history of the idea of these lockdowns;

            https://www.aier.org/article/the-2006-origins-of-the-lockdown-idea/

            Reply
            • Alan Foster

               /  25th May 2020

              [Deleted, no name calling please], I’ll keep reminding you of the death rate in Brazil then.
              Are you saying that if NZ didn’t have a lockdown, we wouldn’t have more than 21 deaths.
              I notice that you didn’t comment on Sweden – Norway – how come?
              Business didn’t carry on as usual in Oz – Queensland still has closed borders.
              Lockdowns keep people away from each other – that’s the science.
              So most countries in the world are wrong & you are right – what is your hat size?

  8. Alan Wilkinson

     /  24th May 2020

    Hard science vs shit science – the outcome of the corruption of a once principled discipline:

    Lockdown saved no lives and may have cost them, Nobel Prize winner believes

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/05/23/lockdown-saved-no-lives-may-have-cost-nobel-prize-winner-believes/

    He’s absolutely right of course. This is a consequence of science retreating from what is and isn’t into “could, maybe and better give me money on the precautionary principle”. Disgusting. Followed by political and public panic and bureaucratic power grabs. Stuff the lot of them. Trump is right again.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th May 2020

      “Prof Levitt, a British-American-Israeli who shared the Nobel prize for chemistry in 2013 for the “development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems”,
      Soooooo…he knows nothing about viruses and epidemics

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  24th May 2020

        Professor Neil Ferguson, the person who created the models that claimed millions would die and was pivotal in the lockdowns around the world, is a physicist.

        So, in Duker’s world, he knows nothing about viruses and epidemics.

        Levitt understands complex systems, I’d bet on his knowledge over Ferguson’s.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  24th May 2020

          Fergusson should get the Ignoble Prize for being most wrong most often.

          Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  24th May 2020

        Like me. But we know b.s. when we see it and can make our own models that actually work and match reality.

        Reply
  9. Corky

     /  24th May 2020

    Time for Paula to go. Apparently, according to talkback, Muller won the leadership by one vote. If that’s true, one vote has changed Paula’s political destiny for the worst. It would also be fair to say National is a fractured party of two tribes.

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2020/05/paula-bennett-the-loyal-national-party-servant-who-just-lost-her-job.html

    Reply
    • If Stu Pidd, ‘Idi’ Ott et al say it on talkback, it must be true,

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  24th May 2020

        I don’t remember saying/believing that fact was true. Besides, what would you know? You don’t listen, yet proffer an opinion like some type of know-all.

        Reply
        • It’s not all about you, your name wasn’t mentioned. Don’t be such an egomaniac.

          But you have sung the praises of talkback and said that people who don’t listen to it are ignorant.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  24th May 2020

            ”It’s not all about you, your name wasn’t mentioned. Don’t be such an egomaniac.”

            Then don’t post to me as above. Logical really…if you think about it.

            Reply
            • I didn’t, it was your egomania that read it as that. Your name wasn’t mentioned. Don’t be so conceited. We don’t all find you as fascinating as you find yourself.

    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Not at all fair to say National’s a fractured party of 2 sides imo. They tend on the whole to be very disciplined about such matters as leader changes, once the decision is made & announced, by my recollection. They’ll know they’ve got four months & a better communicator who really can’t do any worse than Simon in the polls. They’ll all “get in behind”.

      There’s a leader change bounce in the polls on the cards, if only our pollsters were more frequent.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        PS: NewsHub/TV3. Muckrakers for ratings. Treat with suspicion.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  24th May 2020

          Wait till the new rankings is out and those who might be lower down the list ( yet to be finalised ) realise that Todds coterie/plotters are well above them. Others that might have been winners but missed out, like Mitchell (who will find Luxon will be on board after the election) and they might not want to be sitting around like Judith Anne does so well. …after being a mercenary who would want to grow old in a safe seat.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th May 2020

            Who cares as long as they make a good fist of whatever spokesperson or Committee roles they get assigned? Unhappy ones who want to make trouble might be shown the door given that on current polling some of them most likely will have to find another job.

            The Party won’t look kindly on shit stirring troublemakers; & that party machine you wouldn’t be advised to try & screw around with.

            Reply
            • Duker

               /  24th May 2020

              I was thinking they might quit after picking wrong side. Adams did so, this could be Bennett’s time to move on, after she will never again hold as much power. Mitchell failed as well and lost his chance to be number one.
              Another 3 yrs in opposition tends to encourage checking a friendly head Hunter

            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              Mitchell’s the one with an accent that most closely matches Bridges’. I guess with their “lawn order” personas they were a natural fit.

              I don’t think the Nats will want to abandon their law n order reputation; Mitchell might still be seen as experienced in that field & worth retaining for it, tho I personally don’t like or rate him particularly.

              Paula I don’t know. She’s a feisty sometimes nasty player, but she’s an exoerienced former Minister & over time she’s acquired better diplomatic, presentation, & communication skills. Have you heard whether she’s been dumped as campaign manager?

              If she’s prepared to accept whatever role given she might be considered an asset. If not – bye bye, perhaps. Can’t see her jumping without being pushed, but we’ll see. I predicted Bridges would get rolled when Todd put his hand up, but beyond that, it’s just speculation & I’ll watch with interest.

              The pundits are guessing too. Gossip may dry up soon.

  10. Kiwi Dave

     /  24th May 2020

    Is/are Duker and Lurcher the same person?

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Seems very unlikely. What makes you ask that?

      Reply
      • I wondered if Duker and Blazer were the same person for a while.

        Reply
        • No to that too. I can usually tell multiple IDs quite easily, especially over time.

          Reply
        • Yes, it was soon obvious that they weren’t; the style varied enough to make that obvious. It’s very difficult for someone to change that; it’s like the way they walk. A walk is extremely distinctive and hard to change.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th May 2020

            I posted on a message board years back where it was something of a game for several posters to assume multiple identities. Had some fun doing the same, given that I like playing “parts”, & posting differently, even now, from the same one identity.

            It was poorly moderated & then eventually not moderated at all, when it merged with an Australian message board. Amongst the ozzers were some really screwed up people; they hated each other; some of them had even met up & relationships had gone sour & it gotvall exposed on the boards.

            A small coterie of the nastier trolls who knewxeach other would google everything they could think of from information gleaned from discussions to track posters they hated down & dox them, or even threaten them with stalking info on where they lived etc.

            It got so bad it was shut down, I was pleased to see. But most folk who adopted multiple IDs before it all went sour did it in fun & it was pretty easy to spot them & tease them because there are so many “fingerprints”, phrases, common errors etc that soon identify individuals unless they’re really sly & dedicated to making no such mistakes or slip ups. That must take so much effort I can’t see the point.

            Reply
          • Corky

             /  25th May 2020

            Well, that’s great. Everyone will now know I don’t use multiple identities. My ego is strong enough not to need backup…. and I really worry about talking to myself.

            Of course, if you can’t do without backup, you can always use back engineered plagiarism software.

            Reply
          • Gezza

             /  25th May 2020

            It’s been said to me that you started posting here, & targeting a particular poster, under another ID. The name will come to me eventually I reckon. Is that the case?

            Reply
            • Corky

               /  25th May 2020

              You tell me…you are the expert.

            • Gezza

               /  25th May 2020

              Ok. I’m making enquries. Might be a while before I get back to you. Research will be needed to find & compare styles. Not a priority for me today.

    • lurcher1984

       /  24th May 2020

      For god’s sake,i have some standards, but not many…KD

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  24th May 2020

        Duker may have better strides than you, Lurchy. He goes to an Indian tailor, as do I. No jean
        leg length of any brand fits me straight off the shelf. $20 for the job. And I get to hear the Indian accent when they speak English. I adore that. For some strange reason it relaxes me.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th May 2020

          Cambodienne, pour moi. Très belle, très agréable.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  24th May 2020

            I can’t comment because I don’t know if they make good tailors? Are you talking about them as a people?

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              She does alterations. Works from home. Recommended by some local clothing outlets. Very efficient. Very professional. Very attractive (Catholic, married of course; just noting that she’s classically pretty) & very businesslike, but pleasant, to deal with. Get one job done you get a voucher for future discounts.

  11. Gezza

     /  24th May 2020

    Heading up to ma’s for security & mailbox check. Back later.
    Luv yous.
    Byee 👋🏼

    Reply
  12. David

     /  24th May 2020

    Labours new “high flying candidate” is anything but, she is another union hack as if they didnt have enough of those already the caucus room must be like a teachers staff room.
    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12334288

    Also who knew but the person paid handsomely to write a report on the appalling state of our Covid tracking system rather than doing a follow up report is being given a position on the Labour list. Convenient.
    You would think polling at 50% they would attract a little bit more diversity of background to their candidates, perhaps a plumber just to liven things up a bit.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  24th May 2020

      Do you know any plumbers who are Labour voters?

      Reply
      • David

         /  24th May 2020

        True, my two are definite No.
        I think the plasterer is the only tradie who likes Jacinda and they are all a bit shady due to the chemicals they are exposed to…both at work and after hours.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  24th May 2020

          Sorry, wasn’t implying none would. Was just a straight out question, knowing you must interact with a few in your work.

          The three plumbers I know here all own their own businesses. One’s a sole operator with an apprentice.

          Another seems to be in business with 2 other plumbers who’re business partners.

          And the third now is pretty much managing full-time what he has grown into a fairly large firm which employs maybe 6 or more plumbers & some apprentices.

          I haven’t had reason or opportunity to talk politics with them before, though I would now.
          No idea how they’d vote or what party they’d support, but I’d guess the 1st two would favour National as small business operators.

          The third I reckon would also be a National supporter – but who knows, some of his plumber employees & apprentices might be Labour voters? Figuring Labour would look after the workers better?

          Reply
        • Duker

           /  24th May 2020

          What do you think Chris Bishop Nicola Willis Nikki Kaye andddddd Todd Muller have in common
          All spent quite some time as political hacks, Kaye especially it’s her entire experience. Clearly that was their sole amition in life , even Muller’s time at Fonterra was as Group Manager for government lobbying…..wonder what was the experience required fir that job?

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  24th May 2020

            Put it this way. You would have had no chance of doing his job. Maybe a janitor or cleaner.

            Reply
  13. Pink David

     /  24th May 2020

    This is really quite funny, in Victoria gyms are not open until the 22nd, but massage parlors are open next week.

    Someone clearly has a priority on one of those things.

    “What Victorians can do and when
    MAY 26
    Public playgrounds, outdoor gums and skateparks reopen with limit of 10 people

    JUNE 1
    Private gatherings of 20 people in a house, including residents
    Public gatherings (indoor and outdoor) increase to 20 people
    20 guests at weddings, plus a celebrant and the couple
    50 mourners at funerals, plus those required to conduct the funeral
    20 worshippers at private or small religious ceremonies, plus those required to run the ceremony
    20 players for non-contact outdoor sport, plus the instructor
    20 people at auction houses, real estate auctions and open house inspections, plus the people required to facilitate
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs to open and serve meals for up to 20 patrons. Alcohol with meals only
    Overnight stays in private residences
    Camping and tourist accommodation, without shared facilities
    Beauty therapy, tanning, waxing, nail salons, spas, tattoo parlours and massage parlours to open with up to 20 patrons
    Non-food and drink market stalls to open
    Community facilities to re-open for up to 20 people, plus staff
    Indoor and outdoor pools to re-open for up to 20 patrons and limit of three people per lane
    Galleries, museums, national institutions, historic sites, outdoor amusement parks, drive in cinemas, zoos and arcades to open with up to 20 patrons per space (ensuring density quotient is applied)

    JUNE 22

    Restaurants, cafes and pubs to serve food to up to 50 patrons. Alcohol with meals only
    Increase number of patrons in galleries, museums, national institutions, historic sites, outdoor amusement parks, zoos and arcades to up to 50 patrons per space
    Ski season can start
    Indoor sports centres, including gyms, to re-open with up to 20 people per single undivided
    indoor space and up to 10 people per group/activity at any one time.
    Indoor cinemas, movie theatres, concert venues, theatres, arenas, auditoriums, stadiums to re-open with up to 50 seated patrons”

    Reply
    • Spot the loophole in the religious institutions; suddenly everyone’s required to run the service!!! And that could be applied to funerals, too.

      Reply
  14. MaureenW

     /  24th May 2020

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12334354
    Nice of Muslim leaders trying to dictate what’s an appropriate political paraphernalia for display in Muller’s office. He should throw in a couple of burkas to even things up.

    Reply
    • The MAGA cap is unfortunate and probably not a good idea, considering what it’s come to mean. I didn’t see them expressing that view as dictating, any more than it would if it was anyone else.

      Of course it could mean Make Ardern Go Away,

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        See my comment below re 1News at 6. Could be currying favour with two big powers.

        Reply
      • MaureenW

         /  24th May 2020

        What has it come to mean? Well

        Reply
        • MaureenW

           /  24th May 2020

          The “well” was a typo, not a demand. Just curious as to what you think the hat represents?

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th May 2020

            Dammit, Maureen. You got me started ! 😐

            I thought you’d hit the Post Comment button by accident & you were going to follow up with: “Well, if you must know, this is what it really means …”

            I’ve been sitting here waiting for the other very fashionable wedge-soled ladies pump to drop, and THIS is what I get ?

            Very disappointed. ☹️

            Reply
            • MaureenW

               /  24th May 2020

              Hardly, she must still be thinking about it G.

            • Gezza

               /  24th May 2020

              Might be reading emails on matters bird-related. I think I might be owed one.

              She’s a hard woman when it comes to Jacinda & Trump. A sweetie in other ways unknown here.

              Not one to cut anyone some slack, unlike myself. 🌸

      • Corky

         /  24th May 2020

        If you listened to talkback you would know Muller also displays Hillary mementos. If you listened to MSM you would also know he likes ”American politics.” Inclusive.

        Reply
    • David

       /  24th May 2020

      Cant see what the problem is. I bought mine from Trump Tower in NY and a couple of Trump Pence 2020 tee shirts, just memorabilia.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        A Muslim community leader said today the cap should be left at home as it represents something very different from when Muller bought it as a souvenir in 2016, as well as two Hillary Clinton pins.

        Aliya Danzeisen of the Islamic Women’s Council said the MAGA cap had no place being displayed in a Parliamentary office.

        “That hat represents the denial of the freedom of beliefs. That hat represents the denial of minority voices. That hat represents the vitriol that has been harming that nation and has been harming the world for the last four years,” Danzeisen said.

        “If he wants to be the Prime Minister of New Zealand it would be nice if he’d choose to display objects that represent the values of New Zealand.”</blockquote.
        THAT is what the problem is. The unsaid real message is most likely that Trump is anti-Muslim. That's the perception of most ordinary Muslims who are not dictators Trump's selling arms to, or who are not people working FOR or associated with such Muslim dictators.

        Personally, because of that perception & because Muller's a Catholic, I think it IS a slap to the face of every Muslim who believes Trump hates Muslims & by association to Islam itself. But maybe that's what Muller wants. A dog-whistle to those who don't think Islam belongs here. Every vote counts now. Not many Muslim votes for National, I'd venture.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        @ Maureen

        That’s a bit overly simplistic, imo. But. What can ya do? Say some prayers?

        Reply
  15. Gezza

     /  24th May 2020

    1News at 6pm: Cutesy little short item interview with Todd on his couch with his Mrs at home.

    Muller says he would’ve fired the Health Minister for breaking the lockdown rules.

    Thinks border needs to be reopened asap to 1. Oz & 2. China, because they’re such an important market. (Nobody tell Con – he’ll spit tacks.)

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  24th May 2020

      Muller says he would’ve fired the Health Minister for breaking the lockdown rules? He would’ve had the Titanic on a different course too and a different 2nd five in the Rugby World Cup. Not to mention a different plan around Gallipoli.😶

      Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th May 2020

      Opposing fir the sake of it is back on the agenda.
      Sounds like he’s just picked up the press releases sitting in Simon’s outbox and let rip

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  24th May 2020

        Yep. Could be. Or could be that these are just policies he agrees with anyway.

        Most PMs would’ve fired the Health Minister, imo.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  24th May 2020

          I would have fired the Health Minister for making the lockdown rules.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  24th May 2020

            He didn’t. He obviously knew as much about the lockdown rules as my pooks.
            The Lockdown Lad is Ashley & the Lockdown Lady is Jacinda.
            Clark is out on the sidelines, not even the Lockdown message boy it seems.

            Reply

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