Stress of Covid quarantine leads to arrest

From Gezza:


It appears that quarantine requirements are very strict, the conditions of those under enforced quarantine more rudimentary than generally realised, & that the services & help available to those effectively sentenced to temporary detention in designated quarantine hotels are causing significant mental health problems for some detainees.

Also, that the police response to those driven by panic or mental distress to escape to outside may sometimes be over the top & harsh. The court’s response to this case could be instructive – although it’s entirely possible that we, the public, will hear little or nothing about it, cos suppression orders.

… … … …
A man has been arrested after trying to escape an Auckland hotel minutes after a fire alarm was triggered.

A witness to the event said the man was distressed and “tried to escape” when he was detained by six police officers.

Police confirmed the man’s arrest and said it was in connection to a “mental health incident”.

The arrest comes on the back of a series of incidents reported by Kiwis in quarantine or managed isolation, some who say the strict restrictions have adversely affected their mental health.

Recently, a 24-hour ban on walking was enforced at some hotels to allow authorities to figure out a way to keep guests, and the public, safe.

The ban came under the scrutiny of the Human Rights Commission who said people who were legally required to stay in quarantine should have access to necessities.

In April, a woman was found in a distressed state in the Novotel Hotel car park by security officers. The woman, who was in her thirteenth day of managed isolation, was issued her with a warning from police.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/121609674/coronavirus-quarantined-man-arrested-after-incident-outside-auckland-hotel

It bothers me that this sort of thing doesn’t bode well for the police’s relations with the public. For the first time in my life, when I see them cruising through Tawa, I find myself now watching them automatically with some suspicion.

I have to actually do an intellectual override of that negative gut reaction, because these public protectors might not all be perfect, but they see some bloody awful things, have to deal with some difficult, even dangerous people, have often got a really shit job to do that none of us would take on, & I respect them for that.

Previous Post
Leave a comment

47 Comments

  1. David

     /  25th May 2020

    It looks quite under resourced with just one period of booked exercise a day, maybe they should have organised art classes or yoga or put up a dart board.
    If you live overseas with the upcoming NZ winter and this you might want to shelter in place and with just 2000 people quarantined many would have chosen that.

    Reply
    • What was he supposed to do ? I’d run out if a fire alarm went. Anyone would,

      I found it incredibly stressful being in house arrest for 7 weeks, as I live alone. The thought of spending that time in a hotel is too awful to contemplate.

      My mother’s friend did have people breaking the law and coming in, thank goodness. The thing that she found most maddening was running out of the large print books that are all she can read now ! I had one that I sent down as soon as the PO reopened, and it was very well received by this biblioholic.

      Reply
  2. lurcher1948

     /  25th May 2020

    Gezza,I feel the police still have the public’s trust,That you look at your local law enforcement officers with suspicion is disappointing,you get that sort of crap on rightwing blogs because they had to hide or hand in their AR15s and their strange idea of their lost freedoms,it’s a shame rightwingers describe the police as scum,In finishing better to have the police on the streets, than vigilantes and gangs.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  25th May 2020

      The polynesian part of the population has always looked on the police with suspicion as they
      were “targeted’ The quarantine lockdown has seen the suspicion extended to the older male paleo-conservatives who have become vocal about ‘freedumbs’

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  25th May 2020

        They are targeted because they commit more crime…are near impossible to deal with..and have thought processes alien to what’s considered normal mentation and recognition.

        A young white middleclass police officer soon has his middleclass attitude of respect and fairness knocked out of him by Polynesians. Hell, Maori even stole Todd Muller’s sandwiches at school.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th May 2020

          That’s the second time you’ve made that claim re Todd’s sandwiches, Corks.
          Do you have a link to back that up?

          Reply
        • That statement of Corky’s is blatant racism, even by his standards. There are Pacifika people in all walks of life, even MPs, something of which he seems unaware. There are Pacifika police officers. Most of these people are just like the rest of the population; trying to earn a living. The idea that they have thought processes that are alien to normal mentation (?) and recognition is totally offensive, and totally false.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  25th May 2020

            Don’t be ignorant. You no nothing about what I speak of. You have no life skills in that area. Maori and Pacific Islanders are in many cases the author of racism used against them. Police officers who are already racist – they may have had their sandwiches stolen, or been bullied at school – will have that racism reinforced. It’s not right, or acceptable, but it’s a reality.

            Please post on topics you know something about. I know what it’s like to be slapped in the face with a pair of gloves by a police officer who told me he could fuck my life up for good if I didn’t watch my step. My crime- standing next to a car that wasn’t mine.

            Reply
            • You can’t seriously expect people to believe that; everyone’s done that at some time.If that happened to someone, they’d have done something a lot more serious than stand in the street. How would they know it WASN’T your car? Was it a cop on a motorbike ? They are the only ones likely to wear gloves,

              I can’t believe that many people would be so smallminded that they would judge all Pasifika/Maori people because someone stole their lunch at school.

              Somewhere recently you made a ridiculous claim about me having made a ‘prediction’ about my push mower…a total lie. I never use one. The link that you gave showed nothing remotely like this. It’s you who should be careful about posting things that you know nothing about.

            • Corky

               /  25th May 2020

              ”I can’t believe that many people would be so small minded that they would judge all Pasifika/Maori people because someone stole their lunch at school.”

              I would hope people wouldn’t be that small minded,too. I would also hope people would take it as a given my comments was not aimed at all Polynesian people, but just those committing crime.

              Seems you like to cover your lack of good commentary by milking some supposed transgression I have committed.

            • You didn’t qualify your anti-Polynesian statements at all. Your own words are there to disprove what you have just said. You said that they are targeted for various specious reasons, including they way they thin, as if they all think alike..

              I have taught classes with some very tough pupils who were both Maori and Pakeha, including the notorious 4BK, so I do know what I am talking about as it happens. I lived in an area of Wellington that had all races and classes; Te Aro. Don’t tell me what I don’t know, [deleted], you have no idea.

            • Corky

               /  25th May 2020

              ”You didn’t qualify your anti-Polynesian statements at all.”

              No, I didn’t. Funny that.🙄🤣

    • Gezza

       /  25th May 2020

      It’s not a happy situation for me to be feeling like that, Lurch.

      We needed the police – to deal with months of harassment from a small gang of feral teenage kids who made my disabled wife’s life a nightmare constantly revisiting our home, at any time or day they chose (making them difficult for the police to catch) after I chased them off for banging on the windows late one night for a bit of fun, teasing mostly elderly widows around here.

      The ringleader’s father was a Mongrel Mob associate who’d hanged himself. Eventually they were caught, rounded up & referred to Youth Aid.

      Because some of these “kids” were big enuf to take me on, & in case things escalated beyond window banging & verbal abuse, I kept a baseball bat & crowbar hidden behind the dining room curtains, should I ever need to physically protect my wife from harm from these shits.

      The police were insistent that I not do ANYTHING to retaliate if we were assaulted or the house was damaged. Call 111. Call 111? They were 30 minutes or more away, every time I did. By the time they ever got here, the blighters were long gone.

      It’s why it took them so long to catch them, although they did stake out the street once, for a few hours after school. Fruitlessly.

      The problem kids disappeared for some months; probably Youth Aid-related. But then the three worst ones reappeared in Tawa village, on bikes, harassing the diminutive Chinese greengrocer & his family at their shop, & just making a nuisance of themselves, daring people to do anything about it.

      The police were called & they disappeared again for some weeks.

      Then one day, upstairs, I saw them out of the window, at the top of our drive. The ringleader flipped his hoodie up as usual & started to come up it, summoning the other two. There was obvious pushback. I assume they said “No, Leave it. We’re sick of getting in the shit.” He slunk away & we never saw them again.

      So, I knew the police just don’t have enuf resources to deal with all the crap that happens. Those who visited us were coming from Porirua station, but they might be at Jville when they got the call.

      My intellect overrides the gut reaction I talk about easily enuf. In part it’s happening because I’m wondering who they’re going to interrogate for doing nothing but being out on the street or driving, or talking in a group.

      And wondering wtf? There’s that identifiable Maori dude up at Cape Reinga on video, threatening to assault a would-be visitor claiming that he can because of his customary rights, & someone reported that the police were actually present. Certainly no report I’ve seen that the police took any action.

      It’s all getting a bit screwy.

      There’ll always be someone going ha ha now middleclass whitey gets a taste of what Maori & Pokynesian people get from the fuzz. Whatabouts don’t faze me. Everybody knows why that happens. It’s not all whitey’s fault cos colonialism. Too glib, too easy.

      Two wrongs don’t make a right.

      And I still trust the police, until I get good reason not to.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  25th May 2020

        Trust doesn’t work that way. Actually you distrust until you get reason not to. That is always my default setting and certainly with the police. More than any other profession they are professional liars and manipulators. Trust them at your own risk.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th May 2020

          Trust DOES work that way.

          As you grow up with a Christian upbringing you do however learn that not all people – and not all Christians – CAN be trusted.

          So you learn not to distrust everybody, & require them all to prove that they can be trusted, but that in general most people can be trusted – however, be observant for signs they shouldn’t be. THEN require proof they can be trusted.

          You and I simply have different approaches to trust. As do others. There’s not one rule, nor is one better than the other, imo.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  25th May 2020

            Trust is about risk management. The bigger the risk the greater the need to prove trustworthiness. Religion has nothing to do with it.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  25th May 2020

              That’s exactly right. So you would likely automatically trust more people in your normal day to day interactions with folk than you even think about.

              Religion has a lot to do with it if you are taught the belief at an early age that Christians are good, God-fearing people who are more trustworthy than people of other religions or no religion, who have no reason to be Jesus-like or to fear God’s punishment. As I was.

              Reality created more than a few internal conflicts that I had to be resolved.

              An example of where I would not blindly trust the police is after a car accident, where the concerned constable will ask after your welfare & gently enquire what happened exactly. They are looking to charge someone. If the other guy blames you & it wasn’t your fault, but you don’t take great care what you say – you’re the one who gets charged.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  25th May 2020

              I hear what people say and nod gently while putting it in the unconfirmed basket, G. If it matters I check it out. If it doesn’t I let it ride there. If that’s what you call trusting I don’t. I guess I was sceptical from a young age probably due to my circumstances and always tried to look below the surface so religious proclamations never got any traction.

            • Gezza

               /  25th May 2020

              Interesting. Do you check the price against what you were charged for every single purchase, no matter how small or insignificant, Al?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  25th May 2020

              No, I do the cost/benefit trade-off, G.

            • Gezza

               /  25th May 2020

              I do the same thing. We just expressed it differently.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  25th May 2020

              So your default is to distrust people but ignore that until the risk becomes significant.

            • Gezza

               /  25th May 2020

              No my default is to trust people until the risk is significant.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  25th May 2020

              That would require you to believe a lot of nonsense which you obviously don’t so it is clearly untrue.

            • Gezza

               /  26th May 2020

              No, it’s not untrue. We’re just coming at this topic from different angles.

              You’re expounding a broad theory. I was talking about how most of us for perfectly practical reasons have no cause to be suspicious of others we don’t know as a default setting. I’ve had insufficient cause to fear that everyone will try to rip me off or exploit me or lie or whatever.

              You might be different from what I perceive as the norm.

              When I said: “So you learn not to distrust everybody, & require them all to prove that they can be trusted, but that in general most people can be trusted – however, be observant for signs they shouldn’t be. THEN require proof they can be trusted.” I meant that in that context.

              To extrapolate that a little & try & put it in the context you seem to approaching this from; a sign that someone SHOULDN’T just be blindly trusted is when you making a significant investment of, say, time or money – like buying a used car, or a house, or an expensive appliance, or investing yourself in a movement or business venture. Caution & due diligence then become the most logical courses of action.

              If you HAVE to have the last word on the topic, by all means do so now. These are mine.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  26th May 2020

              No, people hold forth on opinions with a dubious factual basis all the time and most sensible people take them with a grain of salt. Including you.

        • Conspiratoor

           /  25th May 2020

          Big talk al. If you saw half the shit the front line has to put up with you wouldn’t be so cavalier in dismissing them all as ‘professional liars and manipulators’

          How far down the hierarchy do you go before you offer them your precious trust? Your default setting is of no interest to anyone until your precious rights are breached and you start squealing like a banshee.

          Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  25th May 2020

            I don’t dismiss them all, C. I just regard them as high risk. Trust depends on the individual, not a place in the hierarchy. I regard any other belief as daft.

            I don’t give a damn about anyone else’s opinion of my default setting, just as I don’t care what yours is.

            Reply
      • I imagine that the not retaliating advice was because you’d be outnumbered by thugs who’d have fewer inhibitions about attacking you than you would have about attacking them.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th May 2020

          Oh no. There were two constables. A male & a female. They were quite clear about that. It’s because I’d be charged.

          Reply
        • Gezza

           /  25th May 2020

          A local dairy owner was furious with the police after he had enough of feral brats stealing from his shop. He managed to grab one & called the police. The cop spent most of his time getting HIS details & telling him he could be charged with assault.

          He kept saying to the cop “Why you want my details??”. He’s always in here, stealing! Why you not asking for HIS details?”

          He was absolutely flabbergasted. Meantime, while this is happening, he said, the little scroat’s mother & rellies were now standing outside the shop, banging on the windows & screaming abuse at him. The cop was doing nothing to stop them.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  25th May 2020

            He just has to say the magic words…’thought he had a knife and I was protecting my family’
            Then end the conversation with ‘Im too stressed to talk any more”

            Comes back to the earlier comments , the cop wants to charge ‘someone’ – he didnt see the stealing but he sees the owner his hands on said scroat. Whats a young constable who wants to meet his KPIs to do?

            Reply
          • Alan Wilkinson

             /  26th May 2020

            I think I’ve said before that my father worked professionally with them for years as a forensic expert witness. He didn’t trust them.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  26th May 2020

              Did he say WHY he didn’t trust them? And that they are all always untrustworthy?

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  26th May 2020

              No, I’ve never said they are all untrustworthy. Probably most are not. But enough are to be wary. I don’t know but my guess is he had sat through enough court hearings to tell that the defence sometimes had a case.

            • Gezza

               /  26th May 2020

              Makes all the difference when you meet someone or get to know them. We might be poles apart on some issues & you always want the last word, (which I remind you only ever counts up until the stroke of midnight – when last one in wins; next day doesn’t count 😉) I trust you because you’re honest. Infuriatingly so at times, especially when you’re wrong.

              And because you’re a good enuf friend to share & be trusted with our concerns, joys & personal experiences. You’re a decent human being & you cover it up well.

            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  26th May 2020

              Yes, and I trust you too, G, as intelligent, kind and caring with a great sense of humour and pretty good judgement on most things except the few that I can tease you about.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s