Anti and anti-anti-racism protests in London, Paris

While anti-racism protesters clashed with French police in Paris it was far right activists causing problems in London.

BBC – French police clash with anti-racism activists in Paris

French police have clashed with activists protesting in Paris against racism and alleged police brutality.

About 15,000 anti-racism protesters gathered on the Place de la République in central Paris early on Saturday afternoon.

They chanted slogans such as “No justice, no peace”. Some climbed on the the statue of Marianne, the symbol of the French Republic.

Police used tear gas against stone-throwing protesters who tried to hold a march that was banned.

The rally is part is a worldwide movement inspired by America’s Black Lives Matter protests.

It was organised under the banner “Justice for Adama”, after Adama Traoré, a young black man who died in French police custody in 2016.

BBC – London protests: Demonstrators clash with police

Groups including some far-right activists congregated in the capital, claiming they were protecting statues from anti-racism activists.

Some anti-racism protests also took place in London and across the UK.

Various groups from around the country, including some far-right activists, said they had come to London to protect symbols of British history.

Hundreds of mostly white men gathered around the Cenotaph war memorial in Whitehall and the boarded-up statue of Winston Churchill in Parliament Square.

There were a number of clashes with police in riot gear as crowds – chanting “England” and raising their arms – surged towards lines of officers.

CNN: Europeans forced to re-examine their colonial histories

The police killing of George Floyd in the US last month has galvanized a global anti-racism movement. Now it is forcing Europeans to re-examine their colonial histories and even question their national identities.
Few Europeans will explicitly defend their country’s historical use of slavery, yet challenging the celebration of the very leaders and merchants who profited from slavery and the horrors of colonialism is proving a less comfortable conversation.

And in the US protests continue.

Fox News:  Seattle police chief and mayor at loggerheads over how to handle zone seized by demonstrators

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and police chief Carmen Best are at odds over the city’s handling of the self-declared autonomous zone set up by protesters spanning several blocks surrounding a police precinct.

Best has accused the mayor of shirking her responsibilities as an elected official and allowing protesters to oust police officers from a precinct located inside the 6-block radius now deemed a “cop free zone.”

Demonstraters inside the perimeter of the “Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone” – or “CHAZ” – have battened down for almost a week decrying police brutality after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis and are demanding the city abolish the Seattle Police Department.

CNN: These are the confederate statues coming down

The death of George Floyd is leading to the removal — by protesters in some cases and city leaders in others — of contentious statues that have riled some residents for decades, if not longer.

Controversial monuments, especially Confederate monuments, have been the subject of nationwide debate, particularly since Dylann Roof killed nine African Americans in a Charleston, South Carolina, church in 2015 in an effort to “start a race war.”
And it flared up again after white nationalists marched in 2017 to protest the removal of a Robert E. Lee statue in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counterprotester was killed amid violent clashes between demonstrators.
Some say they mark history and honor heritage. Others argue they are racist symbols of America’s dark legacy of slavery. While some cities have already made efforts to remove them, others have passed laws to protect them.

It looks like an issue that is going to linger.

Meanwhile Donald Trump has backed off what was seen as provocative rally: Trump Reschedules Rally After Criticism of Juneteenth Overlap

The rally would have fallen on Juneteenth, a day that memorializes the end of slavery. The site of the rally, Tulsa, was home to a notorious instance of racial violence in which hundreds of black people were massacred 99 years ago.

“Tulsa was the site of the worst racist violence in American history. The president’s speech there on Juneteenth is a message to every Black American: more of the same,” Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.) tweeted.

Trump and his allies defended the timing of the rally. The president told Fox News the date was not intentional.

“Think about it as a celebration. They’re always a celebration,” Trump said. “In the history of politics, I think I can say there’s never been any group or any person that’s had rallies like I do.”

But:

The Federalist: Trump Addresses Protests And Riots: ‘Toughness Sometimes Is The Most Compassionate’

“Toughness sometimes is the most compassionate,” Trump said when asked if he intends to be both a law and order leader and a consoler. “When you look at the damage, and the travesties, and the small businesses, and the death. When you act soft and weak you end up not being compassionate.”

Trump and compassion usually appear to be as divided as the US is divided over race and politics.

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32 Comments

  1. Duker

     /  14th June 2020

    “”Protests in London will be far more peaceful today than last week. ” said PD yesterday.
    Hes learnt the art of speaking words of foam from the master practitioner , Donald Trump

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      Last weeks protests were ‘largely peaceful’ according to the media, with around 50 Police injured. This weeks will be even more ‘largely peaceful’

      Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      Peacefulness index

      Last week; 49 Police injured, 14 arrested
      Yesterday; 6 Police injured, ‘more than; 100 arrested

      Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      Reply
  2. artcroft

     /  14th June 2020

    Seattle has fallen to the protesters who have set up an independent state downtown.

    Fox has responded with their usual dose of informed and reliable reporting, by posting a photo montage of various different riots showing armed protesters and burning buildings. None of which relate to what’s happening in Seattle. Gotta keep the marks misinformed and frightened, I guess.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  14th June 2020

      “Fox News published digitally altered and misleading images on its website’s homepage Friday that made a demonstration in Seattle, in which a group of largely peaceful Black Lives Matter protesters have occupied six city blocks, appear violent and dangerous.

      The deceitful tactic was called out by The Seattle Times. The local newspaper reported that when it asked Fox News about the images, the network removed them.
      Fox News’ depiction of the demonstration mirrors much of right-wing media’s attempt to portray it as menacing. Protesters have declared a small slice of Seattle an “autonomous zone” after clashes with authorities led police to evacuate a precinct. While there have been some sightings of armed individuals, the area has remained largely peaceful with people gathering for food, speeches, and movie screenings.”

      Movie screenings …how very Seattle
      https://edition.cnn.com/2020/06/13/media/seattle-fox-news-autonomous-zone-protest/index.html

      Reply
    • Faux News is working overtime on competing with OAN

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  14th June 2020

        To be fair, it’s very hard to tell the difference between CHAZ and Monty Python.
        lots of oppression, and it’s only been a couple of days. when are you moving there?

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  14th June 2020

          It’s all going from the asinine to the ridiculous now.

          I liked it better when they just wanted to save the planet.

          Reply
  3. Duker

     /  14th June 2020

    Looks who is killing the Police – Boogaloo Bois
    Air Force Sergeant Charged With Murder in Killing of Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Deputy
    “Santa Cruz sheriff’s deputy Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller, 38, was killed and another deputy was injured Saturday in an attack allegedly carried out by Carrillo. Officials said Carrill was armed with homemade bombs, an AR-15 rifle and other weapons. Santa Cruz County Sheriff Jim Hart said the suspect was intent on killing officers.”

    “Multiple sources with knowledge of the federal investigation into both shootings say Carrillo is believed to also be the gunman in an Oakland shooting outside a federal courthouse that left Federal Security Officer David Underwood dead two weeks ago.”
    https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/air-force-sergeant-charged-with-murder-in-killing-of-santa-cruz-county-sheriffs-deputy/2307872/

    And who are the Boogaloo Bois
    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2020/4/28/1940542/-The-far-right-wants-to-make-its-shared-Boogaloo-fantasy-of-violent-civil-war-a-reality

    The guy in the centre wears a Boogaloo shoulder patch, with a small igloo

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boogaloo_movement

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      “Looks who is killing the Police – Boogaloo Bois”

      So, man bites dog story?

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  14th June 2020

        Well it is news when its right wing militias who talk of sparking a civil war, by killing police hoping retaliation will be on the protesting blacks

        Reply
  4. oldlaker

     /  14th June 2020

    No one seems to want to discuss the history of slavery in NZ, or the miissionaries’ role in stopping it. This from Te Ara encyclopedia: “The early missionaries were appalled at the sight of Ngāpuhi raiding parties returning from other tribal areas with large numbers of captured slaves. Some of these Ngāpuhi became Christians and agreed to release their slaves.”

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      Brushed under the rug.

      Reply
    • duperez

       /  14th June 2020

      One of the nice things about the world is that anyone is free to discuss the history of slavery in NZ. You just did. There are infinite vehicles by which to do it too.

      I’m sure you are not seeking to diminish the ongoing impact of slavery on the United States by mentioning the experience in Aotearoa. The effects, short and longterm would seem likely to be different, and individual according to the particular circumstances and evolution of the country at the time of the slavery and later.

      “Slavery was not unique to the United States; it is a part of almost every nation’s history, from Greek and Roman civilizations to contemporary forms of human trafficking.”

      “By 1860, the Texas enslaved population was 182,566, but slaveholders represented 27 percent of the population, and controlled 68 percent of the government positions and 73 percent of the wealth. These are astonishing figures, but today’s income gap in Texas is arguably more stark, with 10 percent of tax filers taking home 50 percent of the income.”

      African-Americans have been free in this country for less time than they were enslaved. Do the math: Blacks have been free for 152 years, which means that most Americans are only two to three generations away from slavery. This is not that long ago.

      Over this same period, however, former slaveholding families have built their legacies on the institution and generated wealth that African-Americans have not had access to because enslaved labor was forced. Segregation maintained wealth disparities, and overt and covert discrimination limited African-American recovery efforts.”

      https://theconversation.com/american-slavery-separating-fact-from-myth-79620

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  14th June 2020

        “I’m sure you are not seeking to diminish the ongoing impact of slavery on the United States by mentioning the experience in Aotearoa.”

        This is exactly what you are trying to do with your post.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  14th June 2020

          No, I’m trying to suggest there’s a world out there where slavery happened. All over.
          You said slavery has been brushed under the rug here. This is your big chance to pull it out and tell us all about it.

          As part of that you might enlighten us to the extent that slavery happened in New Zealand and the ongoing economic and social impacts of it. I’d like to know.

          I’m sure you won’t claim you can’t find sources with details and academic research about slavery in New Zealand because no-one did any work on the topic because they were ‘brushing it under the carpet.’

          Reply
          • Pink David

             /  14th June 2020

            “No, I’m trying to suggest there’s a world out there where slavery happened. All over.”

            Are you? You did not say this at all. You redirected to the United States, and the United States alone.

            If you were trying to talk about slavery happening all over you would have said that and used more than one reference. You could, for example, have talked about North Korea and the slavery that is currently there, or China, or Africa.

            “As part of that you might enlighten us to the extent that slavery happened in New Zealand and the ongoing economic and social impacts of it. I’d like to know.”
            “I’m sure you won’t claim you can’t find sources with details and academic research about slavery in New Zealand because no-one did any work on the topic because they were ‘brushing it under the carpet.’”

            Has anyone studied the first part of your question? Do you have an academic reference for the impact of slavery in modern NZ? Has this ever been studied, and if it has, what has the reception to this been?
            The ongoing impact would be interesting. The single reason that the prominent tribes have their position, and assets, is as the result of being successful at conquest. What happened to the losers?

            Reply
            • duperez

               /  14th June 2020

              You mean I shouldn’t have just given an example about the United States? Like you and oldlaker shouldn’t have just used Ngāpuhi as an example?

              Prominent tribes might have their position and assets as the result of being successful at conquest. Do they have them because of slavery? How significant was slavery as the basis for our country as it is now do you think?

            • Duker

               /  14th June 2020

              Ask the descendants the Ngapuhi slaves how badly they have been treated by Ngapuhi since then …..
              Oh you cant because they were Maori and are now are indistinguishable from the general maori population.

              Slavery by romans or other historical groups isnt really relevant to BLM or the modern world

            • Pink David

               /  14th June 2020

              “You mean I shouldn’t have just given an example about the United States? Like you and oldlaker shouldn’t have just used Ngāpuhi as an example?”

              What conversation are you reading exactly? I never mentioned Ngāpuhi , I know nothing about them.

              You are the one who claimed your intent was to say slavery was a universal, which I totally agree with, yet your post did not reflect that at all.

              “Do they have them because of slavery? How significant was slavery as the basis for our country as it is now do you think?”

              Slavery was a part of the conquestor/conquested balance. Good question for some research on the impacts of both parties. Got any references for it?

            • Pink David

               /  14th June 2020

              “Slavery by romans or other historical groups isnt really relevant to BLM or the modern world”

              I agree. All these things are just that, history.

            • Pink David

               /  14th June 2020

              On this topic, there is some interesting reading on the potato.

              When it was introduced, it revolutionized warfare in NZ, freeing up large numbers of fighting men because the potato could be tilled by slaves, and did not have the ritual requirements of the kumara.

              What interesting parallel. Southern America cotton, NZ potatoes.

  5. Jay3

     /  14th June 2020

    I see they have launched a campaign to remove Seddon’s statue from Parliament due to his anti-Chinese views. That being the case, surely the next target should be the removal of the over-the-top Mickey Savage Memorial at Bastion Point. Labour Party hero Savage had well- known racist views towards Chinese and Indians and actively sought to prevent these groups from immigrating to New Zealand during his time in Parliament. Unsurprising that he supported a white immigration policy similar to Australia’s I suppose, as that was where he came from.

    Reply
    • Pink David

       /  14th June 2020

      There is a 5m high statue of Genghis Khan in London. Just wait until the Chinese find out about what he did in the past….

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  14th June 2020

        Removed back in 2012, as it was only to commemorate his ‘anniversary’
        Another fail

        Reply
        • Pink David

           /  14th June 2020

          That is a shame. Kind of cool having a statue of the most interesting people to have lived.

          Good news though, the Mongolians have a 40m high statue of him.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  14th June 2020

            I think they probably still have a Trump Blimp – to be flown on special occasions – like when when he visits London?

            Reply
            • Pink David

               /  14th June 2020

              Perhaps they could replace the Churchill statue with it?

            • Gezza

               /  14th June 2020

              No. He’s an Amercan anti-hero. They’d be better off replacing it with the Sadiq Khan Blimp. At least he’s a pom.

  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  14th June 2020

    The madness is more contagious than the virus. I’ll sleep it out until the lunatics are back in their asylums.

    Reply

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