Arrest and murder charge following killing of police officer

Yesterday morning in Massey, Auckland a police officer was shot and killed and another was shot and wounded after what was described as a routine traffic stop.

https://i.imgur.com/M9jOyfj.png

A member of the public was also wounded when hit by a car.

Last night a man was arrsted and charged with murder.

From Police news:  Person charged with murder following shooting of Police officers

Police investigating the fatal shooting of a Police officer in Massey have charged a man with Murder.

A 24-year-old man has been arrested and charged with multiple serious offences including Murder, Attempted Murder and Dangerous Driving Causing Injury.

He will be appearing in the Waitakere District Court tomorrow.

The investigation into this incident is ongoing and Police are not able to rule out the possibility of further persons being charged.

Our thoughts are with the family of the slain Police officer and we are continuing to ensure they are provided with all possible support.

The other injured Police officer and member of public remain in hospital in a serious but stable condition and we are also supporting them and their families.

Police will not be in a position to confirm the identity of the Police officer until tomorrow at the earliest.

Earlier – Commissioner’s statement following Massey incident

It is with a heavy heart that I confirm that one of our colleagues injured in the incident in Massey, West Auckland, today has died.

This is devastating news and absolutely the worst thing for us to deal with. We have lost a colleague and friend in our Police whānau.

Our thoughts are with the officer’s family and loved ones, and with the other officer and member of the public who were injured in the same incident and their loved ones.

From the information we have this was a routine traffic stop and is the type of work our officers do every day to keep the public safe. At this stage there is nothing to indicate that the job was going to be anything out of the ordinary.

At around 10.30am, a police unit has performed a routine traffic stop on Reynella Drive.

The attending officers were shot and a member of the public has also been hit by the vehicle.

The second officer and the member of the public are in hospital where they are being treated for their injuries. The member of the public has minor injuries and the officer has serious injuries.

The alleged offender has fled the scene and enquiries are ongoing to locate them.

While efforts to locate the offender are ongoing staff in Tāmaki Makaurau will be armed.

Our priority is to support our officers and to locate this alleged offender as soon as possible.

This incident points to the real risks our officers face on the streets, doing their jobs, every day.

Staff safety and welfare are our absolute priority and our whole organisation is in a state of shock after these horrific events.

It is bad and sad news when police officers are attacked and shot and killed in the line of duty.

This has already brought up the debate again about the arming of police. This incident will be investigated, but it’s hard to see how police could be prepared for a routine traffic stop on a Friday mid-morning turning so violent.


More on ‘routine traffic stop’:

At 10.28am on Friday morning, two officers responded to an alert involving a vehicle of interest in Massey. It is unclear what the alert was, or why it was a vehicle of interest.

Putting on their lights and sirens, the two officers attempted to pull the car over, but soon lost sight of it.

The car, fleeing police, hit and injured a member of the public before coming to a crashing halt on Reynella Drive about 10.30am.

A man got out of the car, armed with a long-barrelled firearm and fired multiple shots at the officers – striking them both. The officers were unarmed.

It’s understood the officer who died was shot in the abdomen. The second officer was shot in the leg and taken to Auckland City Hospital in a serious condition, where he is now in a stable condition.

After opening fire, the shooter got into another vehicle and fled the scene with a second person.

The Armed Offenders Squad was called in, cordoning off the suburban streets, and a manhunt was instigated.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/crime/121892361/man-struck-by-car-involved-in-fatal-police-shooting-just-10cm-from-death


Stuff: Officer killed identified by police

Police have released the name of the officer killed on duty on Friday.

He was Constable Matthew Dennis Hunt, aged 28 of Auckland.

Police Commissioner Andrew Coster said in a statement Hunt’s family gave their blessing to release his name.

Hunt, who grew up on the Hibiscus Coast, joined the New Zealand Police in October 2017 as a member of Wing 312. His family said it was his “lifelong dream” to become a police officer.

Hunt was the 33rd to have been killed in New Zealand in the line of duty since 1890, and the first since 2009.

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59 Comments

  1. Gezza

     /  20th June 2020

    I’m not sure why the Police Commissioner keeps calling this “a routine traffic stop”.

    He has made it clear in his 2nd press briefing yesterday that the officers spotted a “vehicle of interest” for which there was a police alert. They switched on lights & siren & it raced off. It then crashed. When they caught up with it after it crashed the murderer got out of the vehicle & shot at them repeatedly with a long barrelled firearm – presumably a semi-automatic rifle.

    This is not what the public understands to be “a routine traffic stop”.

    Is this phrase being used now as part of a campaign to justify general arming of the police?

    Reply
    • I have updated the post with a detailed description of what happened regarding the police stopping the vehicle..

      Reply
    • Gezza

       /  20th June 2020

      I also want to know if the individual arrested is a gang member or associate, and if so which gang. So far I’ve seen nothing to indicate repeaters/reporters have asked this question.

      Any comment yet from Marama Davidson & the other usual objectors to police being armed?

      If Worksafe got involved in this situation it would likely recommend that in future only armed officers should attempt to stop “vehicles of interest” for which there are police alerts.

      Nothing seen yet from the Commissioner about WHY this was a vehicle of interest.

      Reply
    • NOEL

       /  20th June 2020

      Stolen cars, intoxicated drivers, driver wanted on warrant, All these have been associated with routine traffic stops where the drivers have done a runner. It’s routine until they run.

      Reply
      • It makes a lot of sense to keep the names quiet if she’s still on the run. It might lull her into a false sense of security and make her careless so easier to find.

        Reply
  2. Conspiratoor

     /  20th June 2020

    Reply
  3. David

     /  20th June 2020

    Will people be marching in the streets about this?

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  20th June 2020

      ”This has already brought up the debate again about the arming of police. This incident will be investigated, but it’s hard to see how police could be prepared for a routine traffic stop on a Friday mid-morning turning so violent.”

      Unless the police approach all stopped vehicles like officers do in the states, you cannot be 100% prepared..even with a gun.

      However, this wasn’t a routine vehicle stop. I think the police are too trusting in such situations. The Napier massacre was similar. Police knew what Jan Molenaar was like. Even the mob had a contract out on him. He was a man to be feared if he became aggrieved.

      So when police went to his home to interview his partner, he snapped. The police were unarmed. They died. I still believe at least one of those officers would have had a chance if they were armed.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  20th June 2020

        That should have been a stand alone comment. Don’t know what happened

        Reply
      • You can’t possibly know what would have happened at Napier; no one can.

        I prefer to take the police’s word about whether something is a routine stop; they are likely to know than you are, after all.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  20th June 2020

          Kitty in my opinion something’s not right here. The Herald reported this morning that it was a vehicle of interest because there was an alert that it was connected with criminal activity.

          I think the Police brass are spinning it like a top that it was a routine traffic stop. It obviously wasn’t if the car is recorded as being connected with criminal activity.

          There is more to come out about this, I suspect. And it won’t look flash for the police bosses. It’s been a topic of frequent commentary that firearms are known to be carried by gangs & other criminals. This looks like a horrific situation waiting to happen.

          Reply
          • We can’t know, and there are probably good reasons not to make everything public just yet. It would be dreadful if the case was stuffed up and the murderer gets off lightly because procedure wasn’t followed and the case was compromised. I trust the cops on this one.

            Reply
  4. Will people march in the streets in protest about this shooting?

    Reply
  5. Gerrit

     /  20th June 2020

    Were not the armed and roaming Police response teams supposed to be used for this type of situation? A “vehicle on interest” stop should always be by armed constabulary.

    Traffic stops not so much. Initially this sounded like a routing traffic stop, not a “approach with caution this vehicle on interest” :

    Worksafe will have to investigate and possibly recommend that all future investigations for “vehicle of interest” stops be by armed constabulary.

    Reply
    • A “vehicle on interest” stop should always be by armed constabulary.

      That’s debatable. Almost all stops of “vehicle on interest” do not result in shootings. If all vehicle of interest stops involved armed police it could raise the risks to them – and to the public. I doubt that anyone here wants shootings by police to get anything like they are in the US.

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  20th June 2020

        Where is Worksafe on White Island visits now?

        If I was the Police Association rep I would be insisting to my members that “vehicles of interest” which are in the police alert system for whatever reason this one was (it may have been reported stolen) must ONLY be stopped by armed police from now on.

        It makes me wonder now, when claims were made that armed officers of the ARTs were involved in routine traffic stops, if this was the kind of situation they were talking about. And if this outcome was the reason.

        Reply
      • Gerrit

         /  20th June 2020

        It depends on why the vehicle was of interest. If it belongs to say a gang member then it should always be intercepted by armed Police.

        With increased gang tensions over territory (physical and market share) Police have to be better armed. Nash made this statement after increased gang tensions and the murder of two gang members.

        ” “Expect to see police openly carrying their Bushmaster rifles and Glock pistols. Expect to see police wearing their new body armour,” he said in a statement.

        “Expect to see the Eagle helicopter in the air. Expect to see police executing search warrants at gang properties and stopping vehicles carrying gang members and associates.”

        https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12308079

        ” The deaths are the latest in an uptick of crime in the Bay of Plenty, following the arrival of the notorious Mongols Motorcycle Club in the area.

        Their arrival stoked simmering tensions with established Tauranga gangs like the Greazy Dogs and the Mongrel Mob, with police warning the newcomers – hardened from inter-gang warfare with firearms – would radically change the criminal landscape.”

        If it is found out that the traffic stop that resulted in an officers death and anothers injuries, was on gang members than Worksafe and Nash need to answer some serious questions.

        Reply
        • Duker

           /  20th June 2020

          Nash doesnt decide on Police policies as the Commissioner has independence to decide , not politicians

          Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  20th June 2020

    Clearly it wasn’t a routine stop. Now the police management have to identify why not and take appropriate action to avoid future mistakes.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  20th June 2020

      Routine stop? They chased it for a short distance, lost sight and then found the car had crashed. Thats when the shooting started.
      Unfortunately cars not stopping is routine

      Reply
      • Gezza

         /  20th June 2020

        To the public a routine traffic stop is for failing to give way, not wearing a seat belt, exceeding the speed limit, unsafe passing, failing to keep left, an illegal turn across double yellow lines – infringement stuff.

        Drivers pull over & face the music in routine traffic stops.

        Stopping a vehicle of interest is not a routine traffic stop. Drivers bolting is not a routine traffic stop.

        Reply
  7. David

     /  20th June 2020

    Lets take a bet that they get name suppression. Its interesting to see our approach with overseas where everyone gets named as a matter of course, we are so out of step globally and slipping backwards in terms of open justice.

    Reply
    • They won’t when they appear in court or when they are found guilty.

      I would like to see names released only when the person is found guilty, and an end to the gladiator sport of having trials filmed and used as ghouls’ entertainment on the news. This is a total invasion of the victim’s privacy; Blessie Gotingco (I hope this is right) not only died a hideous death, she was victimised all over again by the details of the rape being gone over for all the world to hear.

      Reply
      • David

         /  20th June 2020

        Secret courts ! How very Soviet of you.

        Reply
        • Well, most are de facto that in the sense that they are not broadcast. Private doesn’t mean secret, though. What good does it do to hear all the details ?

          Victims don’t deserve to have the ghastly details broadcast for ghouls to salivate over. They can’t say that they don’t want this to happen; it’s a gross invasion of privacy.

          There is also the idea that someone is innocent until proved guilty. Imagine the stress of being wrongly accused and the whole country seeing you night after night, or even having your name and face broadcast.

          Name the person when they are found guilty, not before.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  20th June 2020

            The Herald strangely is saying the injured policeman has ‘name suppression’ – No he doesnt, it can only be made by a judge and hes not in front of a court
            The accused was said to have name suppression even before the court appearance, which also is false.
            The Herald knows who butters its bread so its doing what the police want. I dont know why they just dont say so.

            Reply
        • duperez

           /  20th June 2020

          Yes, to not run the risk of being thought to be running a ‘secret’ system with secret Soviet courts, every person involved should have their names made public from the time of any incident coming to light. Is that how you see it?

          Reply
          • Me ? No, quite the opposite.

            The wording was probably clumsy about the policeman. I’d hate to see a press feeding frenzy and his and his family’s privacy not respected. I am unlikely to know him, so would be none the wiser. It must be dreadful enough without the press broadcasting his name. He and they need quiet and privacy just now. We know what happened. We know he’s seriously injured. We don’t need to have the press prying.

            Reply
  8. duperez

     /  20th June 2020

    From the comfort of our safe homes we’ll get to go over every minute part of what happened, gained third hand, and put every single word under the microscope.
    We’ll be able to say what should have happened, what shouldn’t have happened and how we’d have done things in the circumstances or organised the world so the situation wouldn’t have panned out as it did.

    And decided what should have been said or not said. The absolute to come out of it, the real action, will be for those who think there should be street marches. Those who are concerned about whether there will be or not, are free to get organising.

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  20th June 2020

      What should have happened was that the vehicle should have stopped & cooperated with the police.

      What actually happened was an arsehole armed with a semi-automatic rifle instead murdered one of our unarmed police officers, attempted to murder another, injured an innocent bystander, terrified the neighbourhood & unfortunately, as far as I’m concerned, is still alive – and thus able to claim status amongst other criminal thugs of his ilk in prison.

      Reply
      • As he had his gun ready and aimed at the police, he would have been unlikely to have been shot by them first. Even if they’d had pistols, they couldn’t have got them out in time. He was always going to win this.

        Reply
      • NOEL

         /  20th June 2020

        Lot of speculation here.
        When did a semi auto creep into the analysis?

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  20th June 2020

          Yes, it is an assumption, based on reports of the number of shots fired from eye & ear witnisses. Does it matter whether he had a 5 clip bolt action or a semi? If the Police were more forthcoming with such detail there’d be no need for speculation.

          Reply
  9. Brian Johnston

     /  20th June 2020

    When the guns were taken away after the Port Arthur shooting in Australia violent and gun crime increased. It is happening here. No surprises on that one.
    Having lived in Australia I do not wish to see an armed police force in NZ. I do not wish to see police with pistols on hips 24/7.
    No armed police, people could own whatever gun they liked – except pistols – and armed defender units all worked in the past.
    The problems always start when the politicians interfere with our lives and without our asking.
    Ironically when we do ask they wont act. Politicians are the problem and that includes Nash.
    When left to themselves and faced with a situation the majority of people do the right thing most of the time. We do not need a fully armed police force do deal with the balance, a small number of problems.
    NZ has huge social problems. It all took a turn for the worse when Roger Douglas closed the factories and Ruth Richardson continued with the policies. Two of the many detestable politicians.
    I believe 220,000 jobs were lost 60% of which were Maori.
    There we go again, those damned politicians.
    We should be a nationalistic patriotic country doing as much as possible for ourselves and each other. We have been sold out to socialist globalism and we are paying the price.
    Unemployment, under employment and low wages are a huge problem far higher than official figures show. The damned politicians again – hiding the truth.

    On a recent flyer Ardern and Labour say we can rebuild by supporting NZ businesses.
    The new rail electrification went to foreign? owned businesses.
    The politicians again.
    How does NZ favour a NZ business when it signed Free Trade agreements not to favour NZ businesses. The politicians again.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  20th June 2020

      “What we can say with certainty is that in the 15 years prior to the first gun buyback in [Australia]1996, there had been 13 mass shootings in Australia.[104 people killed , 52 injured] In the 21 years since more restrictive firearm policies came into effect, there has not been a single mass shooting in the country.”
      https://theconversation.com/factcheck-qanda-did-government-gun-buybacks-reduce-the-number-of-gun-deaths-in-australia-85836

      “In the two decades following the gun reforms, there was a reduction in the annual rate of gun deaths – from 2.9 per 100,000 in 1996 to 0.9 per 100,000 in 2016.
      Numbers were falling before the Port Arthur massacre , but different states had tightened gun laws before that too
      “In Victoria, firearm reforms were introduced in 1988, eight years earlier than the rest of the country, following two mass shootings in the state. The reforms tightened restrictions on semi
      automatic longarms, but did not include a gun buyback.”

      Reply
  10. Gezza

     /  20th June 2020

    Herald:
    Police are asking for the public’s assistance to locate Natalie Bracken who is wanted in relation to yesterday’s shooting in Massey.

    The 30-year-old has a warrant to arrest on driving charges and is also wanted to arrest as an accessory after the fact to the alleged murder of Constable Matthew Hunt.

    Police said they had no information to suggest that Bracken is in possession of a firearm but she does have previous history for a possession of a knife.

    She is said to have associations with several gangs.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12341490

    This article says the vehicle was flagged as connected to criminal activity. That sounds like a high risk stop, given how many raids on gangs turn up illegal firearms.

    Reply
  11. Of the 33 policemen (all men) killed in NZ since 1890, 4 were killed by the same man; Stanley Graham in 1941.

    Reply
  12. Reply
    • That was quick.

      Reply
    • Corky

       /  20th June 2020

      The police probably passed more than one car carrying firearms during their search for Natalie Bracken.

      Reply
      • Pointless speculation; you can’t possibly know this one way or other. They can’t stop every car on a possibility.

        Reply
    • Gezza

       /  20th June 2020

      Good news. Good work by the Police. She’d have had nowhere to hide.

      Reply
      • Nowhere to hide and suddenly no friends, either.

        Reply
      • Corky

         /  20th June 2020

        Yes, when a cop is killed criminals know whoever did it is a dead man walking. The only unfortunate thing is when whoever did this is jailed, as long as they keep their nose clean, they will earn respect from everyone inside as you have previously pointed out.

        My guess on the sentence: 20 years before parole. In the States it would be a life sentence. If the judge had had good sex and booze the night before, maybe a more lenient sentence of 30 years.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  20th June 2020

          Alleged 24 year old murderer said on 1News at 6 to have been high on P when he was arrested.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  20th June 2020

            They also said that Natalie Bracken “obtained the keys to a second vehicle” that the two fled in. No information given on HOW she obtained the keys, or from who.

            Reply
            • Gezza

               /  20th June 2020

              Mind you, the young, gay-sounding, male repeater/reporter also described the offender as having used a “long-armed firearm”. 😐

  13. Gezza

     /  21st June 2020

    Stuff: Police are taking questions from the media this afternoon in relation to the fatal shooting of an officer in Auckland.

    Assistant Commissioner Richard Chambers and Waitematā District Commander Superintendent Naila Hassan are speaking at Henderson Police Station.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/300039124/auckland-shooting-emotional-police-pay-tribute-to-officer-who-paid-highest-price

    I hope someone in media will carry this as a live broadcast & post a link. I want to hear what the repeaters/reporters’ questions are.

    Reply

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