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47 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  4th July 2020

    I was given my lumps over this issue. But I knew time would prove me right. It couldn’t have turned out any other way. What has surprised me is the the amount set aside to tackle this problem… $50 million.

    The principal of BeachHaven School was interviewed about this problem. She said they were having trouble with truancy services who didn’t seem to be doing their job. This was a concern for the principal because time and effort was put into providing information that wasn’t being acted upon. The talkback host couldn’t get his head around what the principal was telling him. I laughed and thought ” welcome to the real world, son.”

    But why? How? What?

    Well, one reason is Truancy Services are scared to tackle some parents. And I don’t blame them. The feral class are impossible to deal with because they don’t care. I said at the time Covid would just be an excuse to completely negate all their responsibilities. I’m guessing some truancy officers have been threatened or abused. So when they are given the address of cases needing attention, a quick look on Google Earth will tell them whether a personal visit is in order… or whether a letter may be a safer option.

    Our pool of uneducated New Zealanders increases by the year. Add that to a decrease in unskilled jobs many NZers will not accept anyway, and things certainly won’t be rosy when the money finally runs out..

    https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/heather-du-plessis-allan-drive/audio/stephanie-thompson-schools-to-get-a-50-million-dollar-boost-to-help-with-student-attendance/

    https://www.education.govt.nz/school/managing-and-supporting-students/managing-student-attendance/attendance-services/

    Reply
    • duperez

       /  4th July 2020

      A fair bit to process in that.

      There are ‘uneducated,’ whatever that means, there are some jobs for the ‘unskilled’ but New Zealanders don’t want to do them.

      I’ll ruminate on the wisdom of slavery being abolished, on trade unions trying to get more money for workers, on the development of a welfare system, on the reality and essential nature of menial work, how we’ve got to where we are and the way to a rosy future.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  4th July 2020

        There’s nothing to process. Apart from feral parents aren’t the only cause for truancy as the interview explains.

        The rest is just your ideology groping for relevance. More than a few bosses have been on talkback stating Kiwis just aren’t taking up jobs on offer post Covid. I wonder why that is? My guess, relative to the largess being laid on by the gummint, it’s just not worth working. Free time is gold…not only money.

        So, really, you should have no gripe with me. Your gummint is delivering on your dream

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  4th July 2020

          Of course there is nothing to ponder and process if you have all the answers.

          (My) ‘gummint is delivering on (my) dream? What’s my dream?

          To upgrade the beachhouse so we have the best one in the Bay of Islands? Get a Bentayga to drive there in style? Get to the US Open in 2021? Achieve those and others by bringing in Malaysian workers to work their butts off for low wages? And have them realise that is their purpose in life, to serve. And they should be bloody grateful for my munificence?

          What’s your dream? Was your dream as you moved through life to help create a good society with as few problems as possible and then have ways of addressing and solving any that arose? How did that go? There are a lot of shit things, there are a lot of things that are not desirable.

          Kiwis don’t want to take up jobs? People don’t want to do the shit jobs so we have to get people in from overseas? Maybe the bosses in the country are victims. Are they architects too?

          Now if there were no social welfare system things would be better. People would have to work. If there were slavery too I could force people to work for me. No idlers in that situation. If we adopted that great tradition of Western culture I’d be able to treat my workers as I wanted as well.

          I’m interested in the unedifying spectacle of those who shed the guilt and sheet the blame. ‘Feral’ has many forms.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  4th July 2020

            (My) ‘gummint is delivering on (my) dream? What’s my dream?

            A FEAR society using taxpayer money.

            Reply
    • Gezza

       /  4th July 2020

      I had a listen. The talback host had no difficulty getting his head around the probem. That shows from his questions.

      He wanted to know from the principal why existing truance services weren’t working.

      She told him why (for their area) & how this extra $50 m would assist her to address the problem.

      She said we really need a bespoke truancy service for each area; this money will enable her to pay the right kind of people to go out & talk to the parents & persuade them to send their child back to school.

      He didn’t bore down into who are the truants. Had he done so, I suspect they would probably be predominantly Maori & from lower socio-economic families with dysfunctional & other difficult circumstances.

      I had a look at your other link from the Education Service on managing attendance & googled a few queries to see what schools are expected to do & who provides Truancy Services.

      It looks like the classic situation of a disengaged policy & vison & document & rule making bureaucracy which has contracted out Truancy Services to an array of private service providers who in many situations likely have checklists to tick off & when they are swamped they just do that.

      Seeing what schools are expected to do in terms of managing attendance & dealing with problem students & their home environment (such as liaising with welfare agencies, health services, Police Youth Services) is an eye opener.

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  4th July 2020

        ”I had a listen. The talback host had no difficulty getting his head around the probem. That shows from his questions. ”

        Yes, he did. However, you weren’t to know that because he expanded on his thoughts when he took calls after the interview. I should have been clearer. He expanded his thoughts on the $50 million and why it was needed, and why couldn’t trunacy officers do their job, as is, now.

        Your last two paragraphs sums things up nicely. Schools should just be schools. Obviously that option is out unless societal problems are tackled before schools become the coal face for such issues.

        Reply
        • duperez

           /  4th July 2020

          The truancy issue is ongoing, systems and approaches have changed regularly over years until complaints come that the system doesn’t work. Suddenly, ‘best thing since sliced bread,’ there’s a revamp. Naturally the discussion can become political.The fact resources are involved is just part of that.

          This latest thing is, well, just the latest thing.

          “Truancy was a problem from the beginning of compulsory schooling in New Zealand. Initially, it stemmed not so much from children’s reluctance, but from transport difficulties or the unwillingness of parents to release children from home duties. In order to enforce school attendance, from 1894 Education Boards could appoint truant officers to investigate cases and take prosecutions. Truant schools were set up from 1900 for persistent offenders. However, school children continued to ‘wag’ school because of boredom, fear of bullying, or dislike of teachers or subjects.”

          https://teara.govt.nz/en/primary-and-secondary-education/page-9

          Over years the responsibility for dealing with truancy has moved from one place, one body to another, to another, and so on.

          https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/dealing-truancy

          Click to access text-gordon.pdf

          https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2503/11879

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  4th July 2020

            Truancy was never a problem when I was at primary school , or even college.
            In fact at college I was a truant myself. I would miss about 6 periods a week, and I was only caught once in 5 years. Given I topped my class in two subjects, I don’t think the teachers looked too hard at my case. While not truancy in the true sense, I was still absent from school for roughly one day each week.

            Perhaps Duperez could find us a historical stats chart. I’m having a problem with relating modern truancy numbers and my own personal experience with the notion of truancy always having been a problem.

            I found this in one of Duperez’s links.

            “For primary schools, which were in a Ministry of Education funded Initiative for Improving School Attendance in 1996, the average rate for absence was 7.2%. We support initiatives to pick up these young people, get them back into the education system and keep them there. ”

            Reply
            • duperez

               /  4th July 2020

              Schools report attendance numbers t the Ministry all the time. Schools tell the Ministry what % of kids are there. I’ve seen school newsletters reporting to parents with itemised % over the weeks. Check school newsletters online to see if there’s a mention. I suppose the target is to have 100% . I’ve often noted attendance numbers in the 92-96% range.

              The problem is not with identifying truants but who deals with it and how. The why is in that I suppose. In our town there used to be a little team of people (I believe each having designated schools to look after.) Of course in this day and age compared to Education Boards having the job, ‘agencies’ get contracts to perform the role.

      • Truancy has always been a problem to a greater or lesser extent. ‘Wag’ meant what it does now in the 19th century and may well have before. I have encountered it in c.19 books.

        In some cases then, of course, it was because the children’s earnings were needed. In others it was because then, as now, the parents didn’t care or weren’t there to care and the children had to fend for themselves.

        I see a fair number of children out with their parents, and no, Corky, they are by no means all or even mostly Maori. It has increased since the lockdown, but if they are being home-schooled, it’s not during the day.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  4th July 2020

          This isn’t the first news item on the problems schools are reporting with much higher than usual non-attendance rates by, especially, pre-school & primary school students since schools re-opened after we returned to level 1.

          There’s some speculation that some parents may be keeping their children home until the start of Term 3.

          It’s also mentioned that children of some immigrant groups are not attending. Possibly these might include Chinese & other Asian immigrants’ kids. Countries where wearing of masks when you’re sick with a cold or flu is normal. Some might be concerned about their kids picking it up & bringing it home?

          While there’s academic research data on the Education site analysing ethnicity groups age and gender of absentees in great detail there’s nothing much on the net in the way of academic analysis of the reasons for absences that I could quickly locate.

          One Truancy Service with a Maori Name (Absentee Services I think is the current jargon) was reported as saying one of their biggest problems is poverty. Poor parents often keep their kids home because they haven’t got money for uniforms, or activities, or food & they don’t themselves and/or the kids shamed. And there’s also family dysfunction & intergenerational non-attendance to contend with.

          It’s a complex issue, even before Covid-19. I thought Whanau Ora & National were on the right track to focussing multiple resources on these most at risk families to try & fix these kinds of issues but what the solutions are & the best way to approach them always gets lost in anecdotal news reports & finger-pointing.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  4th July 2020

            One thing I found interesting in a 2016 analysis report was that the absenteeism rate for Maori pupils was much the same at kura kaupapa & combined schools as it was for general schools.

            I also forgot to mention, lack of money for transporting kids to schools was another reported factor affecting attendance among poorer families by that Absentee Service head.

            Reply
  2. Corky

     /  4th July 2020

    Someone who is finally standing up to this unending crap around ”gayness” The decline in Western culture is on display for all to see…except us.😕

    https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/world/2020/07/vladimir-putin-jokes-us-embassy-staff-in-moscow-are-gay-after-they-flew-a-rainbow-flag.html

    Reply
    • Gezza

       /  4th July 2020

      Gayness is so commonplace it shouldn’t be controversial these days.

      Might be best if you don’t read this tho, Corks.

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/opinion/300047913/the-bewildering-politics-of-gender-pronouns

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  4th July 2020

        ”Gayness is so commonplace it shouldn’t be controversial these days.”

        I agree. But the continued push to make gayness something above its level of importance; and trying to educate the public that gayness is normal, when it isn’t, is the problem.

        Your link re the census is a classic example. Lordy, to have a leader like Putin telling us how it should be would be great. (minus the murder and torture and corruption of course). The two drips we have leading our major parties are a lost cause. TV3 did a great number on both last night.

        Reply
        • “that gayness is normal, when it isn’t’

          Not really.

          Gayness isn’t normal for people who aren’t gay.
          Gayness is normal for people who are gay.

          Reply
          • Corky

             /  4th July 2020

            It’s a biologically abnormality. Yes, gayness is normal for people who are gay, just like a one armed man using only his right arm is normal for him. But it isn’t normal for our species. It’s an abnormality.

            The problem is this argument is twisted around on people with my viewpoint to mean we are gay haters, and the abnormality is with us..not gays.

            Reply
            • “It’s a biologically abnormality. ”

              No it’s not, it’s normal in many species.

              Perhaps intolerance of differences in others is what is abnormal.
              Across cultures, 2% to 10% of people report having same-sex relations. In the U.S., 1% to 2.2% of women and men, respectively, identify as gay. Despite these numbers, many people still consider homosexual behavior to be an anomalous choice. However, biologists have documented homosexual behavior in more than 450 species, arguing that same-sex behavior is not an unnatural choice, and may in fact play a vital role within populations.

              https://theconversation.com/stop-calling-it-a-choice-biological-factors-drive-homosexuality-122764

              That sounds like it’s a normal biological variance.

            • Corky

               /  4th July 2020

              ”Perhaps intolerance of differences in others is what is abnormal.”

              There we go, as I pointed out above. There’s something wrong with me.

              ”However, biologists have documented homosexual behavior in more than 450 species,”

              Yes, behaviour. But not a biological imperative. Straight prisoners sometimes make a choice enter into a gay relationship out of necessity.
              However, I’m told such behaviour is not a choice?

              That does not mean I don’t believe people are born truly gay. They are.
              However, the reason for that lies in the realm of metaphysics and not biology.

              But what about all these folk who don’t know what they are because of societal indoctrination? Billy likes to play in a dress. So Billy is now gay…and needs support. We have a whole industry now based on the above.

            • Duker

               /  4th July 2020

              “Yes, behaviour. But not a biological imperative.”
              Oh thats right the penguins or whatever read about it and decide to ‘try it out’
              It must be an imperative for them to behave like that as its not learned from parents. Mating urge is biological and they certainly dont have higher brain function to understand what they are doing is different.
              neither do you have the ability to have real knowledge whats happening via the University of You tube

            • Corky

               /  4th July 2020

              Youtube..what, what!

              ”Mating urge is biological and they certainly dont have higher brain function to understand what they are doing is different.”

              I forgot who was quoted as saying something like this: sometimes people happen upon a fundermental truth. But it seems so simple they ignore it and carry on as normal.

            • You can’t have lived with animals, or you’d have seen gay sex going on there. Why do you think that cows had painted stripes on their backs ?

              Dogs leap on each other.

              In the past, homosexual sex could result in the death penalty; no one would risk being hanged or even a long prison sentence to ‘try something out’.

              What consenting adults do in private is no one’s business but theirs. There is something a bit creepy about people who try to make it their business or even think about it.

              Uptick for admitting that there’s something wrong with you.

          • I can’t believe that anyone still thinks that gays cross-dress.

            Reply
    • Gezza

       /  4th July 2020

      However, the reason for that lies in the realm of metaphysics and not biology.

      Eh? What’s metaphysics got to do with it?

      Reply
      • Corky

         /  4th July 2020

        For you, nothing. Look upon my statment as a flight of fancy. I was overdue for my morning cup of organic coffee made with A2 milk.. things started to become a little fuzzy.

        Reply
  3. lurcher1948

     /  4th July 2020

    Life repeats itself Simon Bridges called the PM Jacinda Ardern a PTPM a part time prime minister, REMEMBER this, Simon is a maori now on No13 on the national list…STILL SITTING AT THE BACK OF THE BUS,JACINDA the PTPM IS STILL THE PM AND LOVED,,BRIDGES AND MULLER FUCKED

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  4th July 2020

      Er, not so fast ,Slick. Remember this. If National wins the election, Bridges is our Minister Of Foreign Affairs. If National don’t win the election…Jacinda’s popularity will start dropping faster than a socialist attempting an honest days work.

      Reply
    • Pink David

       /  4th July 2020

      “BRIDGES AND MULLER FUCKED”

      Curious claim. Did you watch?

      Reply
    • Lurch, has the PM taken her promised paycut of 20%, a solidarity gesture because of the people who have had a 100% paycut, yet ?

      Reply
  4. Pink David

     /  4th July 2020

    Trump has moved on from building walls. He’s now in the statue business. A national garden of statues.

    Reply
    • Moved on from an incomplete job to a deliberately divisive campaign stunt.

      Reply
      • Pink David

         /  4th July 2020

        As divisive as tearing down statues?

        What would a non-divisive solution look like?

        Reply
        • I don’t agree with pulling down statues arbitrarily either.

          But I would prefer a president to at least consult first, and not just come up with his own preferred list. I’m surprised he hasn’t put his own name on it.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  4th July 2020

            Aljazeera tv carried his rally live. I listened for maybe 5 minutes but it was such a typical & blatant attack on “the left” I gave up & switched it off, so I dunno what he went on to talk about. A commentator noted in a news segment some time later that most of those statues he was referring to were actually removed by the state legislature authorities, not torn down by protestors, and haven’t been there for over a hundred years as many people now think. Many of Confederate heroes were put up in reaction to the various black civil rights campaigns from the 60’s onwards and more recent BLM protests.

            Reply
            • Pink David

               /  4th July 2020

              “Aljazeera tv”

              Seems strange to be watching a TV network funded by slave owners in these times.

            • Gezza

               /  4th July 2020

              Similar claims are sometimes made about immigrant exploitation here.

              I don’t watch it so much these days because it’s wall to wall Covid-19. But even Sir Bob Jones recently rated it the best overall international news service. I know enuf to pick out the news from the opinion & what their bisases are.

            • Pink David

               /  4th July 2020

              “Similar claims are sometimes made about immigrant exploitation here.”

              Your definition of similar is different to mine.

            • Gezza

               /  4th July 2020

              Possibly a misunderstanding due to the brevity of your one-liner whatabout squirrel. We are discussing the removal or defacement of statues historically associated with slave owners or slaving states in the US. Their commenentator I refer to is an American.

              Await your link to proof the funders of AlJazeera news are current slave owners.

            • Pink David

               /  4th July 2020

              The Guardian has an entire section on it. Knock yourself out.

              https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/series/modern-day-slavery-in-focus+world/qatar

            • Gezza

               /  4th July 2020

              Yep. Pretty bad. Similar borrowed fees, underpayment, overwork, migrant exploitation & illegal withholding holding of passports by labour recruiters & employers reported here, but on a smaller scale, & authorities limited in their resources to investigate & prosecute. Here the areas are not construction but services like offshore fishing industry, market gardens, orchards, ethnic restaurants, liquor stores (of all things).

              US is worse than us though:
              https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/19/us-modern-slavery-report-global-slavery-index

              https://www.globalslaveryindex.org/2018/findings/country-studies/united-states/

              Looks like they’re still at it domestically in the modern day too. But like many Western countries, no doubt ours included, many of their companies have just quietly outsourced a lot of their modern day slavery to offshore countries – keeping it at arms length.

          • Pink David

             /  4th July 2020

            “I don’t agree with pulling down statues arbitrarily either.”

            Divisive don’t you think?

            Reply
            • Yep, divisive. But the president is being particularly divisive given his public exposure and power don’t you thin?

            • Pink David

               /  4th July 2020

              No.

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