Euthanasia and cannabis polls

Research NZ has bing doing polls related to the referendums on euthanasia and cannabis.

Asked whether they were in favour or not in favour of the legislation which allows terminally ill adults to request a medically assisted death:

  • 64% in favour
  • 18% not in favour
  • 7% don’t know

Research NZ managing partner Emanuel Kalafatelis said 52 percent of survey respondents said they had recently seen or heard information about legalising euthanasia, while 55 percent said they had thought about the issue and about a third had discussed it with their friends and family.

…the figure shows a softening in the level of support and when the same question was asked in December last year approximately 70 percent of respondents were in favour of the legislation, while the number of those strongly in favour of the legislation dropped from 50 percent six months ago to 33 percent today.

Kalafatelis said there is a relatively higher level of support among older age groups, but the level of support across all age groups is well over 50 percent.

“Are you in favour or not in favour of a government controlling by law how cannabis is grown, manufactured and sold in New Zealand for recreational use.”

  • 43% in favour
  • 39% against

These results do not show any major difference with the results from the cannabis poll taken six months ago, he said.

Kalafatelis said there is quite significant support for legalising cannabis among younger age groups, with the level of support at 57 percent amongst the 18 to 24 year olds.

Report: Kiwis back euthanasia, split on legalising cannabis – poll

Official information:

Cannabis legalisation and control referendum

End of Life Choice referendum

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23 Comments

  1. David

     /  20th July 2020

    As a libertarian I think you should be able to end your life whenever you want, its yours not the governments and you should be able to get a pill that stops your heart beating if you feel like it.
    I am however struggling with the dope debate internally, there is no two ways about it it can cause harm to some and that harm can be the harshest to young men at the stage where their brain hasnt developed properly and they have little concept of risk. I dont think they should have a criminal record but if keeping it illegal stops some people ending up being regular users then I think on balance we should leave things as they are.
    If you supported locking the country down because of the risk to a few people because of Covid, if you support the restrictions on the sale of liquor, if you support health and safety laws, if you support the building code, if you support speed limits well this is all harm minimization laws so why would you liberalize dope rules.
    I have a friend who,s son had a psychotic break after smoking dope at university and he commited suicide, went from a happy kid to a terrible place sadly and yes it was medically diagnosed not just a hunch.

    Reply
    • Jack

       /  20th July 2020

      But it’s the government which would provide that pill. It would be the government you look to/trust in, to condone your free choice. There are other, truly free ways, to assist yourself near end of life. As a libertarian, surely you don’t want any governmental input regarding your choices pre last breath?
      The Euthanasia debate always comes down to ‘what would I want?’ Or ‘what would that individual we witnessed suffer intensely want if he could do it all again?’
      It’s not about the common good at all. It’s not a safe call for any government to legalise. And it’s not a helpful debate. It will always be an individual thing. Where government gets involved, problems re life and death will be exasperated.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  20th July 2020

        I don’t understand how you can think that government banning it is not getting involved but not banning it is getting involved.

        Reply
        • Jack

           /  20th July 2020

          That’s right. Let’s hope that future generations don’t have cause to waste more resources by trying to get this thing banned if it gets voted through as a good idea (government involvement in a no-go matter, imo) this time.

          Reply
      • David

         /  20th July 2020

        Governments don’t make any medicines so wouldnt buy it off them.
        I don’t want a government to condone my choice i just don’t think the government should have any say over what I do to my life cycle.
        I didn’t argue for a common good, for obvious reasons.

        Reply
      • Gezza

         /  20th July 2020

        My ma died, in a Rest Home Hospital towards the end of Level 1 lockdown, of metastatic colon cancer. She was 83, but fit & mentally agile, & fought it with chemo, surgery, & one course of radiotherapy to get the longest time of quality life possible until the inevitable end.

        Her chemo was stopped in January when it was clear that it was no longer having any effect & that the cancer was spreading remorselessly. Still living at home, she went onto Hospice care, which consisted of nurse & social worker visits, daily opiate medication, & other drugs to help control bodily functions as they started to be affected.

        She was promised that there was no need for her to die in pain & other medications were available to help her deal with anxiety should the need arise.

        She quite quickly deteriorated to the point where she was unsafe alone & needed to go into hospital-level care & reluctantly, but freely, chose to do so. From that point on, though, she was no longer in control of any aspect of her life & while she was not in pain, per se, she was in constant discomfort & suffered multiple indignities that were an unavoidable consequence of her condition for her last two months of her life.

        In her last few days, before she lost the ability to speak & open her eyes, & when her thinking was becoming frequently disordered through exhaustion & discomfort, she told me that had there been an option to end her life peacefully at a time of her choosing, earlier, she would have taken it. It was the only time we discussed the matter. Her final days were miserable ones.

        I would have supported her to end her life earlier. While she was not in pain, her suffering was real & could have been avoidable.

        Reply
        • Gezza

           /  20th July 2020

          Gawd – sorry ma! She was 93. But nobody, especially medical professionals, could believe it. They’d all tell her that they’d have put her at 10 to 20 years younger because she was always so fit, looked younger, & was so mentally alert.

          Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  20th July 2020

          Yes. My wife died from starvation after weeks in a morphine coma. I wish we just had the chance to say goodbye properly and finally instead.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  20th July 2020

            My sympathies Alan. And I meant Level 4 lockdown – sorry, still a bit emotional over it. Ma ensured that all her affairs were in order & I was able to carry out all her final wishes to the letter as a result of her sense, action, & clear-headed directions. But it was a stressful time for both of us as she was able to express her discomforts & lack of agency.

            Reply
          • Alan, how dreadful. I hope that the Assisted Suicide will be extended to cover conditions like your wife’s.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  20th July 2020

              MND is ghastly, Kitty. Prolonging it when there is neither hope nor capability is pointless and painful.

            • I have seen people with it; it should be their decision when to end it. No one should have to starve themselves to death or be expected to live with that level of indignity.

              As I don’t want spiteful sneers & vile comments , I don’t want to talk about my own experiences with terminal illness here.

        • Jack

           /  20th July 2020

          “In her last few days… & when her thinking was becoming frequently disordered… she told me that had there been an option to end her life peacefully at a time of her choosing, earlier, she would have taken it. It was the only time we discussed the matter.”
          Can we make right decisions re life and death for the collective good on that?
          Individual testimonies are great. Governmental decisions are another matter.
          Your individual testimony is a case in point why this matter should not have gone to referendum.

          Reply
          • Gezza

             /  20th July 2020

            I have always preferred that the bill was simply passed & that the legislation was subsequently enacted. Ma had the mental capacity to make that choice. A problem with current system is that medical professionals & hospice staff – while fantastic in their compassion – seem reluctant to describe the likely final stages of the disease. They focus on telling the patient not to worry.

            Reply
            • Jack

               /  20th July 2020

              Probably because they respect the individuality involved in life and death.

            • Gezza

               /  20th July 2020

              Perhaps. I accept that the condition will progress to the end differently in every patient. But Ma eventually wanted to go earlier, in the end, than she did. I wish that she had had the option. She was frustrated that her body wouldn’t comply.

            • Jack

               /  20th July 2020

              My sympathies to you Gezza. Our lived experiences of death are what keep us in community.
              It sounds like your Ma was a gem and the love lives on in you.
              We had a friend in similar circumstances who looked to his friends at the end. I remember feeling acutely frustrated by the ‘process’. It didn’t fit his needs. So, we just stayed and comforted him.

    • Blazer

       /  20th July 2020

      Schizophrenia is excacerbated by …dope.

      Reply
    • Harry

       /  21st July 2020

      David – you claim keeping cannabis illegal is harm minimization. It is not. It is exactly the opposite, along with a violation of basic human rights. One suicide that you are acquainted with does not justify restricting everyone’s freedom. Also, I note that you do not call for making alcohol illegal. despite the many lives damaged by it.

      Reply
      • PartisanZ

         /  21st July 2020

        On the Drug Harm Index Alcohol is 72% harmful to self and others

        Cannabis, by comparison, is 20% harmful.

        Because they’re not classified as ‘drugs’, we have no idea the harm caused by Fast NotFood Soft NotDrink, Caffiendated Fizzy NotDrinks, or Non-Nutritional Food Addictives like Sugar, Salt, Fat and Preservatives …

        Or Environmental Toxins like Roundup on EVERYTHING and Hi-Cane on your Kiwi!

        Existential TOXICITY.

        Reply
  2. PartisanZ

     /  21st July 2020

    YES … and YES …

    Reply

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