Tarrant sentencing begins today

Brendon Tarrant pleaded guilty to the murder of 51 people and the attempted murder of 49 people at two mosques in Christchurch on 15 March 2019.

His sentencing begins in Christchurch today. As it will allow victims to have a say via Victim Impact Statements it will take three days.

As Tarrant has chosen to represent himself he will also get a say. It will be interesting to hear what approach he takes now he has had a 17 months to contemplate what he has done, and also what he didn’t achieve apart from near universal condemnation.

Tarrant will get a mandatory life sentence. The unknown at this stage is what sort of non-parole period he will get, if any. It has to be the most severe sentence given in New Zealand since capital punishment was abolished.

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47 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  24th August 2020

    ”It will be interesting to hear what approach he takes now he has had a 17 months to contemplate what he has done, and also what he didn’t achieve apart from near universal condemnation.”

    No, it won’t according to some, Pete. I’ve posted on peripheral issues surrounding the Tarrant case and have been accused of ‘glorifying’ him.’

    ”Patzcuaro / 22nd August 2020
    It took me a while to remember who he was, you on the other hand seem to be glorifying his name.”

    Of course, that post is nonsense. This case has issues of law, free speech ( or lack of), cost and emotional responses that have not been transversed in a court case in NZ.

    After Tarrant’s sentencing by all means let’s forgot about this chap.

    Reply
    • Jack

       /  24th August 2020

      Agree with you. Not fair to throw around moral judgements against one person who rightly comments on wider issues re this crime.
      I have one of my own to share –

      Many churches, dangerously, subtly teach that Muslims also have a cross to bear.

      Dangerous is an understatement.

      Kimbo the resident theo-knowalot yesterday claimed I have not clearly shown anyone what is their cross to bear. That’s an outright lie from an unwilling nitpicker.

      As for the subtle lies coming from church leaders, I heard exactly that from a Presbyterian elder last week – “Well, the cross is relevant to everyone. Muslims also carry their cross. They believe in Jesus.”

      Reply
      • Duker

         /  24th August 2020

        Tarrant isnt a muslim.
        Why is it the mosque worshippers fault… what does it matter what other religions teach about Muslims. Totally irrelevant
        Whats really happening from jack is nearing onto hate speech “Dangerous is an understatement.”
        It should be nipped in the bud with some judicious moderating. After terms like ‘neo conservative’ are excised

        Reply
        • Jack

           /  24th August 2020

          Try again Duker. Not one iota did you attempt to refrain from trolling. If you can’t abide it nor contribute with care, ignore it.

          You know and I know that the mod is sensible.

          Reply
          • Jack

             /  24th August 2020

            I refute all of your above accusations. As such, you are the hate speaker and that is dangerous for Kiwis.
            But I’ll cut you some slack. You don’t know the cross and your knee jerk reaction is understandable, considering how useless are the churches. And you haven’t read my book. There couldn’t be anything less ‘neo conservative’ in this context.

            Reply
            • Blazer

               /  24th August 2020

              Boring,relentless spam….go and write a book…or something.

            • Griff

               /  24th August 2020

              Same God different profet
              Who cares Muslim or Christian are equally as wrong.
              There is no God.
              The majority of kiwis share this view

            • Jack

               /  24th August 2020

              A noisy minority interjects, spewing too.

            • Corky

               /  24th August 2020

              ”There is no God.
              The majority of kiwis share this view.

              Great science, Griff. And you know this,how?”

              What you mean is the majority of polls show most Kiwis don’t believe in God. That doesn’t account for those that secretly do. Or those who have a sudden change of heart on their deathbeds. Or those who in later life do start to believe in God.

            • Griff.

               /  24th August 2020

              Its called a census corky.
              https://www.stats.govt.nz/news/losing-our-religion

              In the 2018 Census, 2,264,601 people in the census usually resident population count reported they had no religion.

              The 2018 Census results showed almost half the population (48.2 percent) had no religion, compared with 41.9 percent in the 2013 Census, 34.6 percent in the 2006 Census, and 29.6 in the 2001 Census.

              “This latest result supports an increasing trend in the number of people reporting no religion in the last few censuses. Now, those with no religion outnumber those affiliated with at least one religion,” census general manager Kathy Connolly said.

              If you project that curve forward, by about 1% a year, to today the majority of Kiwis don’t have a belief in religion.

        • Duker, I think that that was clumsy wording on Jack’s part. It did sound as if she meant that Muslims were dangerous, but I don’t think that she did.

          Reply
  2. Alan Wilkinson

     /  24th August 2020

    The only interesting thing about Tarrant is whether he will go to his grave realising he is a PoS.

    Reply
    • Jack

       /  24th August 2020

      Compared with the relevant wider issues around his crime, the criminal is irrelevant.

      Reply
  3. Jack

     /  24th August 2020

    https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/news/crime/christchurch-gunmans-plans-outlined-in-court-for-the-first-time/

    Our poor Muslim Kiwis. This will be a stressful triggering time for them. They are in my thoughts.

    Then inane things can trigger stress from years and decades beforehand. Our Muslims need all our love now and ongoing.

    Kiwis need reminded that it is only a Christian who may carry the cross. We need this confusion settled. It is one of the wider issues and needs dealt with lovingly.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th August 2020

      For Muslims it is haram or prohibited to carry , wear , buy or sell a cross as a religious symbol. Its part of their religions ban on idolatry or worship of images ( including pictures or statues) or religious symbols.
      I would think they would be very offended if non muslim used the christian symbols in reference to their situation.

      Reply
      • Muslims believe in the historical Jesus, as do Jews, and respect him as prophet.

        I don’t know why Jack uses the word ‘inane’ here. Does she think it means ordinary? It doesn’t.

        Reply
        • She also seems not to realise that ‘a cross to bear’ is frequently used of a burden of any kind. It’s used by Christians and non-Christians.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  24th August 2020

            Jews and Muslims would be offended if you used christian imagery like that and as an allegory for ‘suffering’. Theres an arabic term for suffering ‘musibah’ , but its absurd and patronising to use cross to bear as a catch all phrase thats anywhere near suitable. For historical reasons its offensive.

            Reply
            • Jack

               /  24th August 2020

              Looks like we’re on the same page then Duker.
              It is condescending and annoying (sometimes in the extreme) to have “cross to bear” erroneously applied. It can be the stuff of terrorism…anti social behaviour etc

              The imagery I use is that which is absolutely unique to myself. It keeps me cult free. Privately it works 100%. If I’m obliged to share, I’m open to mockery – and fair enough.

              The Christian’s cross to bear is the opposite of suffering.
              It can be incredibly frustrating how hopeless the churches are.

              There is as much understanding between Kiwis (an underground fresh stream) as there is simmering anger (muddied surface water) I think.

            • I doubt if Jews and Muslims would be so small-minded and intolerant of the expression ‘a cross to bear’. I didn’t mention the word suffering, and it’s not an expression I use, anyway.

        • Jack

           /  24th August 2020

          Inane was not the best word I suppose, although it does work there. Ordinary would be better. Thanks Kitty.
          Yes, most people know Jesus Christ was a prophet. A Christian knows him as God.

          Reply
      • Corky

         /  24th August 2020

        That should tell you something, Duker.

        Reply
        • Jack

           /  24th August 2020

          [Deleted – a warning to all to not accuse others of trolling, it’s effectively a form of abuse. PG]

          Duker, a Christian carries his cross in his spirit. No one is suggesting a physical item. It’s not a burden at all, nor a symbol.

          The cross makes the personality whole.

          The Muslim needs symbols. The Christian needs none.
          Christians blend in and mend society.

          That church folk use the term ‘cross to bear’ so blatantly wrongly is terrible for NZ.

          A Christian’s cross is carried in Church, nowhere else.

          Reply
          • Duker

             /  24th August 2020

            Muslims dont have religious symbols while the cross is the core symbol of christianity.
            People mistakenly think the crescent (often with a star) is a symbol of islam, its not . It began in Byzantium if not earlier and then became a symbol of the Ottoman Empire.

            Reply
            • Jack

               /  24th August 2020

              Christianity is a cult. A problem to be ironed out. The cross is not a symbol to a Christian. More correctly, it doesn’t need to be, but we do cling to our worldly comforts.

          • Jack

             /  24th August 2020

            [Deleted. I’m not going to get into discussions over this. If I see it I have acted on it for years. And my tolerance for shit fights is lower than normal, I can’t be bothered with that sort of behaviour here. PG]

            Reply
  4. Jack

     /  24th August 2020

    Your cross to bear is not a burden in the natural. Nothing like losing a child or an act of terrorism or difficult work mates or…
    Using the cross to prop up one’s righteousness (patience, acceptance, kindness etc in the midst of problems) is an abuse of the cross. This is what some Christians attempt to do in comforting our Muslim Kiwis.
    Christians don’t know what the cross is, b/c the churches are pathetic. It bodes unwell for NZ’s future.

    Reply
  5. Jack

     /  24th August 2020

    The Christian is only one. In this respect Church consists of just you and God.
    There is nothing like the name of Jesus Christ and the word ‘cross’ to get up people’s hackles. Yet it only comes from one individual, weak and powerless in politics.
    Then there is nothing like the challenge to others “take up your cross” to bring out hypocrisy among the crowd.
    Only Jesus Christ was ever a martyr from the point of view of paradise. The individual who dares to say so gets isolated and abused. In NZ, this is the case already after just a few generations of church life.
    It is time for Kiwis to reject cult – every cult.

    Reply
    • Jack

       /  24th August 2020

      Limbo called me the Jack troll. Duker called me a rude phrase. I’ve been falsely accused of quite a few things here in times past and not protected, but this is not me complaining. It is the most pertinent point of all, a political one.

      The Christian is only one politically. I belong to Kiwi Church even if I am the last one standing. As an individual I have zero political clout. This is how faith is for every Christian (or should be).
      Muslims belong to a cult, as do many groups of Kiwis (belonging to their chosen cults. ‘Cult’ is not a derogatory word). Cults are groups and if they grow strong politically, it’s bad news. I feel just the same about cults from Christianity.

      I belong to Church, the only place I may carry my cross. As a lone voice anywhere, I am easily silenced, ignored, abused and in the case of this secular blog site – not respected as others are. That’s why I like it here.

      A Christian makes the decision to allow only Jesus Christ to be his victim. Wherever Kiwis choose this attitude they grow in character. In the case of loving our Muslims these are the Kiwis going about life in the most intelligent and compassionate ways.

      Our loved Muslims time of grief will be very long term. Grief is a vicious cycle.

      Reply
      • Jack

         /  24th August 2020

        What I really wanted to say was that I haven’t been protected here because it’s Jesus being scoffed, not actually myself.

        Now, why would Jesus Christ be mocked when one wee Jack troll squeaks, yet when cult groups grow in number their religious beliefs command/demand respect to the point of a loss of freedom for all? This is the largest of ‘wider issues’ I would like to see discussed while we all forget about that criminal.

        Reply
  6. Brian Johnston

     /  24th August 2020

    1. The cross was originally an ank and originated in Egypt.

    2. Tarrant should go to full trial. Him pleading guilty is not sufficient, it only tells us someone is going to gaol. We need a full trial. We need to know what happened and we need to know that the right person or persons is convicted.

    3. The comments on this topic so far amount to squabbling.

    Reply
    • I don’t think that the cross as Christians know it was originally an ank/h; it was the way of execution in ancient Rome and was the shape of a cross. It was one of the cruellest ever execution methods.

      If it was originally the ank/h, it would look like an ank/h.

      Reply
    • Jack

       /  24th August 2020

      BJ – Most of the comments were by myself and I was in loving earnest. If you detest squabbling then don’t do it.
      I enjoy giving out some spiritual food for thought. Others responding could be seeking and I learn from them too. Your points one and two are useful.
      Of course spiritual discourse will be a part of all this. Point three is mockery and undermines Kiwis’ healing process. Amounts to cult.

      Reply
    • Duker

       /  24th August 2020

      “We need to know what happened and we need to know that the right person or persons is convicted.”
      The prosecution has an outline something like 28 pages of evidence of ‘what happened’
      There is no doubt of the right person, far more than the usual standard of beyond reasonable doubt. Its a certainty. Read the extensive summary of facts.
      A trial is not required when someone pleads guilty as there is no longer any need to prove a case to a jury of 12. Nor a defence to cross examine.
      People who want a ‘show trial’ for their own morbid fascination need their heads read.

      Reply
  7. Brian Johnston

     /  24th August 2020

    I understand the crosses used in crucifixions were either an X shape or a T shape.
    With the T, the pole remained in the ground and a cross piece was dropped into a slot at the top.
    The pictures showing Jesus carrying a cross are wrong. He would have only carried the cross piece.

    Reply
    • Yes, I know that about the cross piece. I didn’t mention it because it didn’t seem necessary to go into such detail. There would be little point in making a new cross each time, digging the hole and so on..

      The Latin word suggests that it was cross shaped as we know it; with the bar going across. I have heard the X theory, but incline to the T or t one. Crucio/are is the Latin for torture.

      Whichever way it was done, it was appallingly cruel.

      Reply
    • The slot might well have resulted in a t rather than a T, as they’d want the crossbar to held firmly and a deep slot would have been steadier.

      My late husband would have known all this; he was a walking encyclopaedia of religious things.

      Reply
  8. Brian Johnston

     /  24th August 2020

    Kitty. I have a book The Trial by Gorgon Thomas. He describes the crucifixion, the post and separate beam. I do not know how accurate his work is generally. Interesting. I read it 30 years ago.

    Reply
  9. Brian Johnston

     /  24th August 2020

    Duker: I trust your sarcasm referring to show trials was not aimed at me. There is doubt. There are two separate images of ‘Tarrant’ on the internet. Who is who. I for one do not know if either is correct. A person pleading guilty does not prove he is the guilty person. He could be serving the sentence for someone else. He could be mad. He could be forced into a confession.
    You say the prosecution has 28 pages of evidence. That does not mean no trial.
    James Earl Ray did not kill King yet went to gaol. King’s family support Ray’s innocence.
    Can you name a previous case in NZ where a person pleads guilty and is marched off to gaol without a trial
    A person goes on trial to prove guilt. The prosecution have to prove their case.

    Reply
  10. Brian Johnston

     /  24th August 2020

    Griff. Early on the post you claimed there is no God. Should you be so sure.
    We did not evolve. ‘Someone’ put us here. Even the blue eyes are recent. We certainly did not evolve from the ape. The 6 million year window is not long enough for the required 300 mutations. Those that put us here – and it could not be a single person – have to be pluralised to Gods. The creation is also pluralised. Thus, the Gods made Adams and Eves. Gods being a term for the race which created us. It is the only explanation which makes any degree of sense. It pays to have an open mind. You are obviously an atheist thus a closed mind.

    Reply
  11. Brian Johnston

     /  25th August 2020

    Blazer: Dawkins, one man’s opinion. I recommend Science & Human Origins by Ann Gauger, Douglas Axe, & Casey Luskin. There is no religious bias. Dawkins is challenged.

    Reply

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