Green reaction to Labour’s tax policy

Labour announced their tax policy yesterday that will barely change anything – see Labour’s underwhelming tax policy.

One of the strongest critics was the Green Party.

From RNZ Labour pledges to raise tax on earnings over $180k

Greens co-leader James Shaw says Labour’s policy does not address “the growing wealth gap and inequality in Aotearoa”, or help pay for the Covid response.

“The Greens believe we should ask those who are benefiting the most to chip in a bit of what they’ve gained to help the people who need support during this crisis.

“We know that a huge accelerator of this inequality is our broken tax system that taxes people who earn but not people who own,” Shaw says .

Greens emailed Labour’s announcement is not enough:

Earlier today, the Labour Party announced their proposal to introduce a new top tax rate. Fixing the way we tax here in Aotearoa is long overdue, but this isn’t the way to do it. Labour is proposing patchwork solutions when visionary change is needed.

Too many of us are struggling to put a roof over our heads, food on the table, or pay rising rents and bills. Tinkering around the edges of an already broken system isn’t enough to address the growing wealth gap and inequality — and it puts us at risk of the gap growing even further. 

We know a huge accelerator of inequality in Aotearoa is a broken system that taxes people who earn, but not people who own. Unless we fix this, the lucky few will continue to amass wealth without paying their fair share while the rest of us struggle to get by. 

It doesn’t have to be this way.

Earlier this year we announced our Poverty Action Plan: a whole new approach to tax that makes sure the wealthy pay their fair share so everyone has what they need, when they need it. 

A small 1% tax on the wealth of millionaires means big change for the rest of us. It’s a simple and fair way to even the playing field and unlock the resources all of us need to thrive and participate fully in our communities. 

By rewriting the tax rules, we’re going beyond the old, broken system and guaranteeing that everyone who needs it, no matter what, has a minimum income they can rely on. Support shouldn’t be conditional and our plan isn’t either. That means support for students and people out of work, extra help if you’re sick or disabled, and simple payments for families so all kids can thrive.

When we announced our plan, Labour was dismissive and said that it relied on “heroic” assumptions. It’s not enough for us to settle for broken systems — a compassionate system is possible and we’re the only ones with the vision and the plan to make it a reality. This is why the Greens need to be at the table in the next Government. 

We are at a crossroads. We can hit reimagine Aotearoa exactly how we want it. Now, more than ever, we know how much we can achieve when we work together — this is our chance to create change that benefits all of us.

But again Labour has been dismissive of Green tax policy. Grant Robertson:

Robertson is promising no other increases or new taxes, but was asked whether that would stand if Labour needed to negotiate post election for support, with a party like the Greens, that has a more aggressive tax policy.

“This is the policy that Labour is campaigning on and we will only implement the changes that are in this policy,” he said.

So he has effectively told the Greens to get stuffed.

With Labour polling at over 50% he can probably be arrogant.

And with Greens polling mostly close to the 5% threshold and 3.2% in the latest (UMR) poll they may have little or no say in the next Government.

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8 Comments

  1. John J Harrison

     /  10th September 2020

    Robinson is quiet correct in telling the Greens to get stuffed.
    The Greens have shown their blatant hypocrisy in the Green school where the state is funding $12 million to assist millionaires in completing the job they were already committed to finishing.
    Their whining about inequality in New Zealand is beyond pathetic when the Green school is charging the highest annual fees in the country at $43,000 P.A.
    The Greens are nothing but world class hypocrites, soon to be turfed out of parliament.
    It will be hilarious watching them plead for highly paid positions in the private sector to keep them in the style they have become accustomed.
    Perhaps Marama will become a lecturer at Massey on how Maori wahine can reclaim the C word.

    Reply
    • Good luck reclaiming a word that has never been ‘claimed’ in the first place. It was a success with queer, but why would anyone want to refer to themselves by the name of one part of their anatomy ? I don’t have any hangups about cunt being used of that part of the body (The Wife of Bath was proud of hers and said that her husband/s had said it was the best one ever seen) but see little point in calling a person that name.

      Reply
  2. I am not sure why the Greens think after the debacle of them demanding the spending the thick end 12 million of the tax payers money on a school for the woke one percenters, we are prepared to trust them to tax us down to equality.

    Reply
    • The old saying about how if all the money in the world was distributed evenly, it would end up in the same hands again in a short time is probably true.

      We once saw a story about a man in Singapore who’d been rich and lost everything in the then crash. He began making sandwiches (?) and selling them himself from a peddlers’ tray. By the time the item was filmed, he was doing well enough to employ people to make and sell whatever it was. He had kept his dream house although he couldn’t afford to live in it, and I bet that he ended up living in it again.

      Reply
  3. Brian Johnston

     /  10th September 2020

    Robertson may have told the Greens to get stuffed.
    I hope the electorates tell them the same at the election.
    The sooner the Greens and NZ First are gone the better.
    Vote The Outdoors Party.

    Reply
  1. Labour’s underwhelming tax policy | Your NZ

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