New Zealand Covid comparison

Worldwide Covid cases may have peaked but new daily cases are still running at 2-300,000 a day, and deaths are still averaging over five thousand a day.

Total cases are over 28 million, and total deaths over 900,000.

New Zealand has generally been praised over our dealing with Covid. We tend to quibble over relatively minor restrictions, and a small resurgence, but comparatively we have done very well to date.

This is how New Zealand ranks with the world (on Worldometer which includes some regions as well as countries):

  • Population: 5,002,100 – 122nd
  • Active cases: 114 – 160th
  • Total cases: 1,793 (includes probable) – 150th
  • Cases per 1 million population: 358 – 164th
  • Total deaths: 24 – 152nd
  • Deaths per 1 million population: 4.8 – 160th
  • Total tests: 848,420 – 59th
  • Tests per 1 million population: 169,313 – 37th

This shows that we are doing relatively well, and I think we can be assured that our statistics are reasonably accurate.

There are 213 countries or territories on the list so quite a few have better statistics, but some of those may not be as complete or accurate.

But we have relatively minor things to complain about here.

Jobs and businesses and the economy are issues and we may not have seen the worst effects yet, but so far things aren’t too bad.

Leave a comment

10 Comments

  1. Alan Wilkinson

     /  12th September 2020

    Being the most geographically isolated significant economy in the world has its advantages.

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  12th September 2020

      Heard of airports ?
      Those in the EU might not have much control over the borders, but most other countries can
      Even India and Canada closed their borders to non citizens
      Israel has practically sealed borders with its neigbours…145,000 cases , 1000 deaths…and one you love a right wing government. They have about 9 million people

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  12th September 2020

        Wait for the stats on excess deaths 2020&21. That is going to be the measure of success and failure.

        Reply
  2. John J Harrison

     /  12th September 2020

    The GDP numbers out on the 17th will give us an idea as to the economic carnage to date.
    It’s the numbers for the next two quarters that will tell the real story of our going to level 4 two weeks later than the MOH recommended.
    [Deleted – that’s an assertion that you can’t claim as fact unless you know Ardern’s thinking (as opposed to claims by critics) – PG]
    The MOH recommendation was for 4 weeks at level 2 which would only adversely affect 20% of businesses, as opposed to 80% being affected under level 4.
    Queensland did it right with level 2.
    Far better health outcomes, no massive borrowings and no economic carnage.
    In New Zealand it’s all about politics.
    The politics of fear !

    Reply
    • Duker

       /  12th September 2020

      The MOH never recommended 4 weeks of level 2 instead of level 4
      Thats another falsehood that should be deleted
      This shows the cabinet papers for after level 4 completed

      A late-May paper from DPMC shows that Health Director General Ashley Bloomfield wanted the country to spend quite a lot longer at alert level 2.
      Bloomfield was keen to spend 28 days at “the full version” of alert level 2, with gatherings restricted to 100 people.
      This only began at 29 May – meaning Bloomfield wanted most of June itself to be in level 2.
      But amid many days with no new cases and a big push from business, National, and NZ First, New Zealand ended up moving to alert level 1 much sooner on June 8.

      https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/121458848/coronavirus-arguments-for-and-against-moving-to-alert-level-2-next-week

      harrison doesnt mention other countries GDP change for June quarter..Australia was 7%, UK was in the 20’s
      The reality was the GDP loss mostly comes from decrease in CONSUMER SPENDING , not production and thats was mostly in ‘services’ not goods. Discretionary in other words

      Reply
  3. duperez

     /  12th September 2020

    In New Zealand it’s all about politics. “The politics of fear!” and the politics of ‘what if?’

    How much better would things have been:

    If there’d been no lockdowns?
    If there’d been no ‘levels’ system?
    If some politicians didn’t make it all about the politics?
    If right from the outset we said we were just going to do what Australia does because
    ‘they’re Big Bro and they always know best.’

    If right from the outset we said we were just going to do exactly what Sweden does because
    ‘they sound like an exotic place, Scandinavian countries are so onto it and they always know best’?

    If from the outset the Government and it’s officials chose a totally different set of experts to take advice from?

    If the Government only took advice from collations from online blogsites?
    If the Government acted without question in implementing every bit of advice from experts.
    If the Government acted by totally ignoring every bit of advice from experts.
    If a relatively small number of people who did stuff up or didn’t realise the seriousness of doing their job properly had done better?
    If the idiots who blatantly acted selfishly hadn’t been so idiotic?
    If Simon Bridges had been the PM?
    If Michael Woodhouse had been Minister of Health?

    It might be all about the politics, not just the politics of fear though. The politics of partisanship and ignorance and selfishness come into it. We don’t know how lucky we are.

    The rationale now for those who think things should be so much better is a picture of irrationality painted on a backdrop of history, and experience and decisions made in new circumstances. The longest lasting side effect and downstream ones might be in overdeveloped bleating glands.

    Reply
    • The number who stuffed up the border testing may be small, but they have a lot to answer for.

      How could anyone be so stupid as to not realise how serious the consequences could be ? Did no one check the numbers done or ask why they were so tiny?

      I can’t believe that there seems to have been so little investigation done or so few questions asked.

      The people in charge can’t not have realised how serious this issue was.

      Reply
      • duperez

         /  12th September 2020

        I suppose some go to the beach and find an upsetting piece of sand determinedly ignoring the 70,000 gazillion ordinary pieces or the 90 trillion gazillion wonderful pieces.

        On a security guard not being aware of an ecaper among workers at an isolation site in Auckland some wanted the head of the PM, the Minister of Health and the Director General of Health. Were you one of those?

        In the situation of the Woodhouse ‘homeless man’ in an Auckland isolation hotel some wanted the head of the PM, the Minister of Health and the Director General of Health. Were you one of those?

        It’s a pity the rugby tournament isn’t going on down south later in the year. All we wanted was just one case arise there and you could have asked, “How could anyone be so stupid as to not realise how serious the consequences could be?” If not you, it would definitely have been others chanting.

        Reply
  4. David

     /  12th September 2020

    Despite Bloomfield we have done very well, we are a compliant lot and Ardern finally realized shutting the borders would be the go just in the nick of time.
    All of the minor issues we have had are because of Bloomfields weak leadership and I dont know if anyone has read the Herald piece but having someone with that much anxiety in charge explains the lapses…along with 3 pretty ordinary ministers.
    Ardern has done well.

    Reply

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