Open Forum Friday

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42 Comments

  1. Corky

     /  16th October 2020

    TV news was having a little fun at Winstons expense last night. While I’m no fan of Winston, theses pricks really need to be called to account in some way. They did the same to Muldoon as he left parliment. The irony. The connection…and the fact it seems liberal media has not changed in the intevening years.

    Reply
  2. Corky

     /  16th October 2020

    Geez, this is incredible. So many Maori have suddenly discovered politics.

    Quote:

    ”Some believe it’s because there’s real competition.” 😏😄

    https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/early-voter-turnout-in-m-ori-seats-up-incredible-99-new-figures-show.html?auto=6200797156001

    Reply
    • Corky

       /  16th October 2020

      ‘SAP Tower in Queen St.”

      I could see myself coming out the front entrance in a business suit… big noting on my way to the Porsche.

      Reply
    • Alan Foster

       /  16th October 2020

      Yes, with no CGT, definitely the way to go.

      Reply
  3. Patzcuaro

     /  16th October 2020

    The ex Republican Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie apologies for not wearing a mask and encourages people to follow the CDC guidelines on COVID 19 after spending a week in ICU with COVID 19.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/10/15/politics/chris-christie-covid-19-statement/index.html

    Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  16th October 2020

      Seems a fair balanced statement to me. Of course CNN just highlights the side they find politically attractive.

      Reply
      • Patzcuaro

         /  17th October 2020

        I thought it was a balanced as well. If they all wore masks thing would improve faster than currently but a return to pre COVID normality is some distance away. You can return to your Fox nirvana.

        Reply
        • Alan Wilkinson

           /  17th October 2020

          Masks reduce infectivity, they don’t eliminate it. It’s still a lottery. They work on populations by reducing the statistics but individuals can still be unlucky. Even in an environment where everyone is tested daily as Christie noted. You can return to your CNN politicised stupidity.

          Reply
          • Patzcuaro

             /  17th October 2020

            They might have been tested daily but that only tells you, within the limitations of the test, whether you are positive or negative. Testing tells you about the past but also allows you to quarantine if you are positive. Wearing a mask is a proactive way of limiting the spread of the virus.
            Politicians due to the nature of their job especially in election years are more exposed to the virus and should have been wearing masks for everybody’s benefit but Trump ridiculed those that did.

            Reply
            • Alan Wilkinson

               /  17th October 2020

              Surgical masks reduce transmission rates by 50-70%. Cloth masks less. If your aim is risk minimisation politicians should simply hide away and meet no-one. That’s what Trump was ridiculing.

            • Patzcuaro

               /  17th October 2020

              @Alan while COVID is uncontrolled the new norm is social distancing so politician are going to need to pull back to reduce their exposure especially as they tend to be older.
              Trump might be ridiculing them for that reason but in reality those politician are just being sensible and Trump is being a bully.

  4. Reply
    • It would be unpardonable interference for any government to legislate what people can ask for houses or what houses are worth. Forcing house owners into negative equity would be crassly irresponsible.

      Reply
      • Fight4nz

         /  16th October 2020

        But ok to force them into wildly over inflated houses is not crassly irresponsible?

        Reply
        • As no one IS doing that, it’s a meaningless question. How are people being forced into this ?

          If people refused to pay the high prices, they would soon go down. Two houses that I know of were on the market for ages because the owners wanted what were then ridiculously greedy prices. They both wanted to move to a more expensive town, but people were not willing to pay for them to do so.

          Reply
          • Fight4nz

             /  16th October 2020

            Yes someone DID do that. Policy allowed it. All very nice, altruistic free market type policy. You know the one that says governments are idiots and unfettered activity of the wealthy means homes for all. Probably with complimentary unicorns thrown in.

            Reply
    • Fight4nz

       /  16th October 2020

      I would like to see those graphs done using multiple of median income.
      The speculation on houses got underway in the 90s so certainly crosses all recent governments. However the Clark government hikes came off a low base, so didn’t start to look ominous until the end of their tenure.
      I still contend that the Key govt was the one that ignored the issue that became glaring. In fact exacerbated it by their ‘economic strategy’ of selling NZ residency and property to all comers.
      This governments most significant failure has been to do nothing about it and simply adopt the build-more mantra.

      Reply
    • Alan Wilkinson

       /  16th October 2020

      Well known that house prices rocketed under Clark. Her 2004 Building Act was a significant contributor. Those blaming Key are just ignorant idiots or political liars.

      Reply
      • Fight4nz

         /  16th October 2020

        I said they rose under Clark. I do seriously question statistics purporting to show it was worse than under Key. And regardless it was under Key it should have been stopped, not made the country’s central economic driver.

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  17th October 2020

        [Deleted NZ political comments. PG]

        Reply
      • Blazer

         /  17th October 2020

        [Deleted – this is NZ political comments, I have specifically asked not to go here today. PG]

        Reply
  5. lurcher1948

     /  16th October 2020

    Doing a study of serial WHINERS, FARMERS or rightwing voters….who are the saddest serial WHINERS

    Reply
  6. Alan Wilkinson

     /  16th October 2020

    Brilliant article in the Telegraph. The author is a black teacher:

    Woke teaching has been a disaster for working class kids

    Critical Race Theory may be cloaked in the language of equality but it has benefited only a narrow elite

    CALVIN ROBINSON
    15 October 2020 • 1:10pm

    The dangers of teaching Critical Race Theory (CRT) in schools are becoming more apparent. Terms such as “white privilege”, quite rightly criticised by Prof Matthew Goodwin at the Education Select Committee this week, are often used to explain perceived systemic racism in education. But not only does this racism not exist, the language of CRT is serving merely to hold back working class pupils of all ethnic backgrounds.

    As Prof Goodwin noted, white working class boys are at or near the bottom of every measurable chart of attainment or progress throughout primary and secondary education, behind every other ethnic group with the exception of travellers and gypsies. How can it possibly help matters for them to be lectured about being “privileged” because of their skin colour and gender when their lives look anything but?

    Meanwhile, statistics from the Office of National Statistics, as well as the Department for Education, clearly demonstrate that black African children are excelling throughout education and are twice as likely as white British children to get into university. If our state education system is institutionally racist, it’s certainly not in the way activists are claiming.

    This is seemingly a case of well-meaning legislation causing more harm than good. The Equalities Act 2010 identifies “protected characteristics” which allow for the provision of “positive action”. It has become socially acceptable, and now legal, to promote support for young black boys, but it would be considered outrageous to offer any overt support to young white boys. We’re beginning to see the results of these double-standards, and it’s not pretty.

    By branding people as privileged based on the colour of their skin, we’re overlooking a whole host of socioeconomic factors at play. The attempt to assign blame for complex societal issues solely on the basis of race is both damaging and insulting.

    There has been very little academic research into the effects of CRT, implicit bias training and similar racist ideologies. A recent study in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General did, however, show that these theories end up reducing empathy for disadvantaged white people while having no impact on the treatment of black people. There’s a cruel irony in an approach which is supposed to improve the life chances of one ethnic group but in fact ends up being entirely detrimental to another.

    There’s an irony too in the way that CRT, in the name of anti-racism, also contrives to hold back disadvantaged black youngsters. How can we expect children from non-white backgrounds to aspire in school if they are being fed a constant narrative of victimhood which tells them that their odds of success are slim to non-existent and that the racist society of which they are a part will never allow them to attain their ambitions?

    This dovetails with the soft bigotry of low expectations as well-meaning liberals, obsessed with the idea that black people face such insuperable struggles that it is unfair to compare them to their white peers, stop expecting the same rigorous standards of disadvantaged black pupils as they do of wealthy white children. Those who are well-off, attend good schools or have the benefit of supportive parents and/or teachers are more likely to see this nonsense for what it is. I fear for those who do not have such advantages and may fall for the lie that they should not aspire to great things.

    Identity politics is toxic and divisive, that much is evident. Indeed, we must do all we can to keep these methodologies out of the classroom; otherwise, we may end up with a generation of white working class pupils with no sense of self-worth and black children dissuaded from reaching their full potential by a narrative of victimhood.

    Instead, we should be teaching all of our young people about the things that unite us. The beauty of being British is that it’s inclusive. It’s more than a nationality, it’s a people with a common culture. A sense of Britishness brings us together, no matter our race or religion. It’s high time the Left reclaimed their sense of patriotism – that’s one quality that once united the Left and Right. The Labour party, when it truly was the party of the working classes, celebrated British patriotism just as much as the Conservatives. If the Labour party hadn’t lost this connection, perhaps the Red Wall might not have fallen in the last general election.

    The questions we should be asking are why the hard-Left is so keen on stirring up racial tensions where there are none to begin with, and why they are so eager to blame every societal injustice on white people. There’s nothing productive to be gained from any of this. If the left truly wants to address inequalities they’d be better off pointing the finger at the class system. But then with Labour MPs more likely to have been to university than their Tory counterparts and their new leader being a barrister, Oxbridge graduate and Knight of the Realm, perhaps that’s a game they no longer feel they can comfortably play. Maybe it’s time to move on from identity politics altogether. Wouldn’t that be a fine thing.

    Reply
    • Fight4nz

       /  16th October 2020

      Which is it?
      “ black African children are excelling throughout education and are twice as likely as white British children to get into university”

      “ CRT, in the name of anti-racism, also contrives to hold back disadvantaged black youngsters”

      Might be some useful truth there somewhere behind the illogical self contradiction. Bit like Collins, throw any mud you can think of and hope something will stick.

      Reply
      • Alan Wilkinson

         /  17th October 2020

        Possibly irrespective of race some children are disadvantaged? And those are the ones worst affected by defeatist woke culture and expectations?

        If you think harder things become clearer.

        Reply

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