Kavanaugh unsuited for Supreme Court

While there is a concerted campaign by Brett Kavanaugh supporters to play down accusations and to discredit accusers, his suitability for the Supreme Court looks increasingly untenable.

There are valid points about ‘innocent unless proven guilty’ to some degree, but a judge of the Supreme Court of the United States must meet higher standards. Kavanaugh’s manner at the Senate hearing last week alone raised questions about his demeanour and his political bias. And claims of drunken behaviour and belligerence keep emerging.

Ana Navarro (CNN): For the good of us all, Brett Kavanaugh should step aside

The ideology of a nominee, and factors like race, gender, ethnicity and creed, are all solely the President’s choice. But there are other requirements for a Supreme Court appointment that should not be optional. A Supreme Court Justice should have intellectual heft, judicial temperament and lifelong fitness of character.

There is no doubt Kavanaugh meets the intellect requirement.

In his first hearings, he came across as calm and deliberative — a cross between a Boy Scout and an altar boy.

That all changed once Professor Ford’s allegations emerged.

Let me say clearly and unequivocally, I believe Christine Blasey Ford.

I believe her because she is not a partisan activist. I believe her because during his hearing, Kavanaugh lied about little things he didn’t need to. I believe her because his good friend, Mark Judge, wrote a book called, “Wasted: Tales of a GenX Drunk,” which mentions a character named “O’Kavanaugh” he frequently got wasted with.

(See FBI interviews Kavanaugh friend Mark Judge)

A lot of people think we should not define a person’s entire life because of grave mistakes made as a teenager. I tend to agree with that. Kavanaugh is certainly not alone in doing things as a teenager that most of us as adults would rather forget.

But his nomination is for the Supreme Court. It is different than any other position in government. Once named, you can’t be fired. You are not accountable to voters or even a President. It is a lifetime appointment. And unlike appointments to lower courts, there is no retirement age and impeachment is almost unheard of. All of this makes the standard for confirmation higher.

I now believe Kavanaugh lacks the judicial temperament and character to serve on the Supreme Court. In the last hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee, he was screaming, crying, disrespectful and partisan.

In his testimony in front of the committee, Kavanaugh was a partisan attack dog. He showed resentment and disdain for Democrats. He questioned Senator Klobuchar about her drinking habits. He brought Trump’s election into it. He blamed Professor Ford’s allegations on Clinton allies seeking revenge for his role in the Starr investigation.

But again, this is for the Supreme Court. Justices are supposed to be free from external political pressures. Given what we heard from Kavanaugh and the emotional scars this process will leave him with, given his animosity for Democrats and his indebtedness to Republicans, would he ever be capable of judicial independence? Every Senator, regardless of party, should ask themselves that question.

If Kavanaugh is appointed to the Supreme Court there will always be questions about his character and his political bias.

Mike Godwin is an attorney, author, and creator of Godwin’s Law.

And more and more facts against Kavanaugh are emerging.

NZH: Brett Kavanaugh and his staff reportedly sent text messages to cover up indecent exposure allegations

Last week, a separate report claimed he exposed himself during a drunken dormitory party in the same period, with various former classmates now publicly weighing in on his alleged out-of-control drinking habits in detail.

And now it has emerged that Kavanaugh and his staff were allegedly sending text messages to silence reports of indecent exposure — before the story had even broken.

Late last month, The New Yorker published a story in which Kavanaugh’s former classmate Deborah Ramirez claimed he exposed himself to others at a party in the early 1980s.

In the report, Ramirez, 53, claimed Kavanaugh exposed himself “at a drunken dormitory party” where she alleged he “thrust his penis in her face, and caused her to touch it without her consent as she pushed him away”.

The story noted she had “gaps” in her memory from drinking, and that she couldn’t clarify his role “with certainty” for six days after first speaking with the journalists who published the story.

Kavanaugh denies the claims.

“This alleged event from 35 years ago did not happen,” he wrote in a statement. “The people who knew me then know that this did not happen, and have said so. This is a smear, plain and simple. I look forward to testifying on Thursday about the truth, and defending my good name — and the reputation for character and integrity I have spent a lifetime building — against these last-minute allegations.”

But it’s now emerged that Kavanaugh, 53, and his staff were reportedly sending text messages to former Yale classmates to underplay these allegations — before the story was actually published.

In one message, Yarasavage said Kavanaugh asked her to go on the record to defend him. Another two messages show communication between Kavanaugh’s team and former classmates before The New Yorker story broke, suggesting Kavanaugh knew about Ramirez’s allegations in advance.

A judge trying to influence potential witnesses should raise legal eyebrows.

A one-time classmate of Kavanaugh said he was a habitual heavy drinker, challenging the judge’s Senate testimony to the contrary.

“I can unequivocally say that in denying the possibility that he ever blacked out from drinking and in downplaying the degree and frequency of his drinking, Brett has not told the truth,” Chad Ludington told reporters.

The North Carolina State University professor, who said he had contacted the FBI with his information, indicated on Sunday in a statement that Kavanaugh was “belligerent and aggressive” when he drank.

A separate report published by The New York Times today claims Kavanaugh has a history of alcohol-related violence during this period of his life.

Sure, valid criticisms can be made of how Democrats have politicised the nomination – but so have Republicans and Trump.

But partisan crap aside, Kavanaugh is looking increasingly risky for, if not outright unsuitable for, a position on the US Supreme Court,