The Nation – candidates on ‘the big issues’

On The Nation this morning Lisa Owens “talks to more would-be MPs about the big issues”.

The candidates:

Priyanca Radhakrishnan –  union member and a member of the Asia New Zealand Foundation Leadership Network and the National Council of Women (Auckland). Labour candidate for Maungakiekie, 12 on the Labour list so has a good chance of becoming an MP.

Brooke van Velden a public relations consultant and ACT candidate for Auckland Central. The ACT list will be announced this weekend. Interview on RNZ.

Jack McDonald – Ko Taranaki te Iwi. Green candidate for Te Tai Hauāuru and Māori Communications Advisor. at 13 on gthe party list he has a good chance of becoming an MP.

Erica Stanfordstaffer for Murray McCully, has has worked overseas in export sales roles. National candidate for East Coast Bays, should win a safe electorate.

To much to cover on the fly here, but Lisa is putting all four on the spot over personal views and positions versus their party policies and positions. A lot of avoiding of addressing these questions.

They all struggled a bit, it’s the deep end of politics so quite a challenge.

Stanford got feisty at times once she warmed up but tried to disguise what seemed like a lack of general political issues knowledge by focussing on electorate representation, which where she is likely to start her political career.

McDonald was well versed in Green policy and diverted to party speak, avoiding direct answers to most questions. When challenged on Greens lack of focus on environmental issues he quoted the party’s four foundation aims but later comments were on social rather than environmental issues.

When it was suggested that the Greens could and should work with any party on environmental issues he said it was “unfathomable” for the Green Party to work with National in Government.

Priyanca was asked if her being a student immigrant clashed with Labour’s clampdown on immigration which had her scrambling a bit. She mostly recited party mantra.

van Velden looked the most in the deep end, struggling quite a lot. She sometimes switched to ACT policy but had difficulty answering general questions that put her on the spot.

Phil O’Reilly on the panel discussion: “In the Green Room you could cut the ambition with a knife’.

Video: The would-be MPs

Transcript: Lisa Owen interviews new candidates

 

 

Media promoting selected candidates

I have major concerns about how media gives selective and disproportionate coverage for some parties and some candidates.

Media often pre-selects candidates and gives them favourable publicity while they ignore or dismiss others. This is common with the selection of which candidates or parties feature in debates.

This is doing a disservice to the public and to democracy.

In part it is probably little more than headline hunting. The amount of political oxygen they give Winston Peters is probably a major factor in his success, as is media failure to hold Peters to account adequately. They seem more interested in his story creating potential and forget their fourth estate responsibilities.

Media can also have a negative effect, often blowing problems and potential things up out of proportion to their importance.

One simple example is renewed media attention given to dildo news. Journalists like to snigger and promote offensive attacks and threats against politicians without caring about the implications of attaching dildo imagery with the targets. I doubt that media outlets would be so salacious if they were the targets.

Selective reporting can lift lucky candidates out of obscurity. This happened in the boring Auckland mayoral campaign, which was everyone thought was a foregone conclusion with a boring Phil Goff. So the media switched their attention to promote Chloe Swarbrick, seemingly for novelty value and to put some interest into their coverage.

As a result Swarbrick did unexpectedly well in the election, and has since been given more media attention when she became a Green candidate.

The media have also been prominent in the rise of Jacinda Ardern to deputy leadership of the Labour Party.

It’s unclear whether media promotion pushed Andrew Little into pushing Annette King and installing Ardern, or whether Labour or Ardern operators manipulated the media to help orchestrate the coup. Whichever it was it was democratically suspect.


The Spinoff is a new media alternative to the old school ‘mainstream’ media. They describe themselves:

The Spinoff is a New Zealand online magazine covering politics, pop culture and social issues. We also have a custom editorial division which creates smart, shareable content for brands.

There seems to be a confusion there between editorial and brand promotion. I thought that news and advertising were supposed to be kept separate.

Yesterday “Politics editor for The Spinoff” Toby Manhire drew my attention to something via Twitter:

That was an odd call for three new candidates. it referred to a this post:

‘Let’s be honest, I wanted to throw up’: Kiri Allan on taking the Labour message from the doorsteps to the TV studio

In her second candidate diary for the Spinoff, Labour’s candidate for East Coast describes door-knocking in the electorate, meeting fellow diarist Chlöe Swarbrick, fronting a press stand-up after that controversial list announcement, and a big TV appearance.

It seems that Allan (Labour), Stanford (National) and Swarbrick (Greens) are being given an ongoing opportunity to promote themselves and their election campaigns via The Spinoff.

There is no suggestion that money is involved but this looks like a selective promotion of “shareable content for brands”.

Sure, media play an important part in allowing the public to learn about political candidates and parties – but a sound democracy requires this to be reasonably fair and balanced rather than picking winners and giving them disproportionate promotion opportunities.

I sought clarification from Manhire about how their ‘candidate diary for the Spinoff’ thing worked and asked “Is giving all first time candidates the same opportunity to promote themselves? Or just a select few?”

Manhire seemed to be deliberately unclear in his response.

All candidates arefree to comment here at Your NZ, or to submit guest posts or inform me of items of interest, but I’m not going to give special preference to any.

@TheSpinoffTV later also simply answered “No”. It seems like another evasive fobbing off.

Last month Manhire detailed The Spinoff versus the 2017 election: our campaign plans exclusively revealed

Generally that sounds quite good, but…

Candidate diaries

We have enlisted a stellar bunch of first-time candidates to write regular posts documenting their experiences as newbies. We begin today with the first pieces from Erica Stanford, National’s candidate in the electorate of East Coast Bays, and Kiri Allan, Labour’s candidate for East Coast.

Not all of our candidates have East Coast in their constituency names, however; we’re also welcoming Chlöe Swarbrick, the insurgent runner for the Auckland mayoralty, Green candidate for Maungakiekie and 13th placed in the “initial” party list. And, with a bit of luck, someone from NZ First, too.

“Enlisted’ sounds like The Spinoff are recruiting – selecting – a handful of candidates to give them special attention. Just candidates from the four largest parties, who already get substantial campaign advantages.

The three already chosen are all youngish and female. Geographically two electorates are in Auckland, one in the north east of the North island. So these selections are not very representative.

Perhaps all three of these candidates will become MPs and may even eventually become Prime Minister as Manhire proposes. And The Spinoff may pat themselves on the back for successfully picking winners.

But in a fair democracy I don’t think the media should be pre-picking winners and providing them with special attention.

Media has to make enough money to sustain their operations, and to do that they have to provide news and information that interests and attracts readers and listeners and viewers.

But if a democracy is to function fairly the media also needs to meet it’s responsibilities. There are growing signs that they are straying from fair and balanced coverage.

We are nowhere near the media and political mess that the US is in, but the power and ability of media to swing an election is certainly there. They need to be as aware of this as they are aware of the need to make money and look cool by selecting a small number hip looking candidates.

Fair and balanced coverage can be difficult to achieve – but it should at least be given priority.

TOP registered, seeking candidates

The Opportunities Party has now been registered as a political party, and they are now looking for candidates, including electorate candidates.

Candidates for the 2017 General Election – Message from Gareth

We need to assemble a team of candidates to stand for The Opportunities Party in the upcoming general election. Not any old candidates mind you, we’re on the hunt for people with a genuine commitment to build a prosperous nation founded on a non-negotiable principle of fairness.

“A non-negotiable principle of fairness” sounds lofty, and it’s also a bit waffly.

You can’t be ‘fair’ to all of the people all of the time. One person’s fairness can be another person’s unfairness.

It’s as if Morgan means (and he’s not alone with this approach to politics) – what fair for all as deemed by a few.

That’s the philosophical requirement and beyond that we’re genuinely interested in people who have the talent, the intelligence and the compassion to fight for a strong economy and inclusive society that delivers benefit for all.

If you or someone you know is of that mindset please consider submitting a nomination. There’s a form to fill in below but hey, form filling can only tell us so much, go ahead and express freely why you want to play a political role in our team. For us this exercise is all about putting some grunt into political progress in our country, shaking the Establishment parties out of their inertia and getting go forward.

We’re not entering parliament to make up the numbers, to tread water and mark time. For us it’s forward or not at all – no political careerists need apply.

They tend to already have careers.

Where are we standing candidates?

We have yet to decide on either the number of candidates or whether we’ll stand in all, or any electorates. Personally I prefer the List as it’s the nationwide social and economic challenges that have always rocked my boat, rather than the special interests of any single geographic area. And we want colleagues with deep knowledge in these areas of national importance if we are to lead New Zealand forward on the big socio-economic challenges of our time. So the calibre of our List is really important to me.

But since we launched we’ve been approached by some pretty outstanding folk who identify strongly with their local area as well and also want to be part of this. We therefore are happy to consider representation electorate by electorate as an option for this talent. Ultimately, I suspect the decision of whether we run in a particular electorate will come down to whether we have an outstanding candidate available. There is no way we’re putting up 60 electorate candidates just because there are 60 electorates – quality comes first.  How many if any electorates we contest is an open-ended question right now – convince us.

What’s our political objective?

A good objective would be to be a lot less wordy.

TOP’s 7 policy priorities will soon be all announced (2 to go) so what we’re striving for, in Stage 1 of our political life at least, is there for all to see. Purely on tactics though, our goal is to influence the government of the day, to snap them from their natural lethargy and get progress in these areas of TOP importance. We have stated on numerous occasions we’ll work with whoever is the government of the day, all that matters for us right now is our TOP 7.

So naturally for us a cross bench position is most attractive, supporting the government of the day in return for as much progress on our TOP 7 as we can negotiate. We don’t really want day to day positions in a coalition government, our goal is to get these 7 policy projects done. It’s the policy that matters, we have no interest in partisan political tribalism.

I want to persuade people with the appropriate credentials to offer themselves as a potential candidate for the sake of a healthy and dynamic democracy. I recognize it’s a huge leap for someone with real talent to put their reputation up for public scrutiny and possible ridicule, especially from political foes and the trolls that contaminate social media. My take on that has been it’s worth a go, the vulnerable in New Zealand need help and we can make a difference for them. That’s how you need to look at it – the worst case scenario is you look back and can say ‘at least I tried’.

So, if this non-Establishment approach to the politics of policy reform appeals to you, and you have real subject knowledge and sufficient resilience to take the crap of politics, then you might well be the type of talent we need to make New Zealand both fair and prosperous again. Alternatively, you may know of someone who fits the bill and might be interested – we’d be keen to hear about them.

Look forward to hearing from you.

http://www.top.org.nz/candidates_for_the_2017_general_election_message_from_gareth

A problem committing yourself to a new party is that you have no idea until well into the process where you will stand in the list pecking order.

If TOP manages to make it past the threshold it won’t get much more so only the top 6-10 candidates will stand any chance, on top of their already low chances of getting to 5%.

 

Subverting the democratic will of voters?

Is telling voters who they should vote for ‘subverting the democratic will of voters’? Wellington mayoral candidate Nick Leggett thinks so, or he thinks that saying so will attract a bit of attention and a few votes.

All candidates in this election must respect the democratic will of the voters. Tactics like this must not be tolerated.

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I thought it was fairly normal for candidates and campaign teams to try and tell voters who to vote for and how to vote.

If voters are being deliberately misled then there could be cause to grizzle, but I’m not sure that’s the case here.

I’m not even sure what “democratic will of voters” is supposed to mean.

Ethics in election campaigns? That’s a bit of an ask.

What about owning Leggett’s “my supporters”? Is it a subversion of democracy to tell them how to vote? Or is it just other people telling them?

More on this…

Pete, the critical distinction is between advising on ranking and falsely claiming a vote for preferred candidate is wasted.

Don’t forget she’s already sending emails citing staffer-stacked Stuff polls as reason voting for Nick is wasted

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The poll she refers to is a Stuff online poll.

I am not a fan of scientifically meaningless online surveys as a means to eliminate ur opponent.

Did 12 years and countless campaigns under pref voting in Oz. Saw stuff to make your hair curl. Never this.

Worth noting Jo ad links to a doctored front page. Not really the paragon of ethical campaigning.

Sounds like things are getting tense in the Wellington contest.

Unlike Auckland and Christchurch, Wellington seems to be a very close run contest with second and third preference votes being perhaps crucal.

Phil Quin says that a recent online poll has been taken down “due to excessive late-night vote-bombing”.

He has provided an earlier poll:

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Online polls are crap (aka very unreliable as they are non -representative, self selecting and easily manipulated), so basing any campaign on these is highly questionable.

I don’t think Leggett came across very well with his tweet bleat, but it looks like he has good cause to be grumpy with the “Go Jo” campaign.

Mana’s Manukau/Auckland candidates

The Mana Party have announced ten candidates for Tamaki (Auckland) electorates. None are rated a chance to win electorates but will use them to campaign for the party vote.

Joe Carolan – Mt Albert

Unite Union Staff – Joe is the Team Leader for Auckland based Organisers with direct responsibilities Cinemas and Central Auckland Fast Food restaurants.

Guest The Daily Blog post – Joe Carolan – I’m all for left wing unity, but not when the other guys are trying to kill you
Senior Organiser with Unite Union, writer for http://www.socialistaotearoa.org, Mana founding member

@SolidarityJoe
Irish socialist living in Aotearoa.

Socialist Aotearoa

Yvonne Dainty – Manurewa

Independent candidate for Auckland Council – Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board – Tamaki Subdivision

Everyone has a basic human right to live where they choose to make and be part of community as a family. To thrive and prosper under fair and due process and the right to Consultation, Accountability and Transparency.

State Housing is not a privilege it is a right. Social and Economic cleansing is not Social Equality.

Born in Tamaki attended local schools. Represented Auckland Hockey Teams and Waka Ama, and still an active member in the community.

I have written policy in 2009 for Health and Housing.

Community in Unity are families made up of Social Equality without prejudice.

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Dr Sitaleki Finau – Maungakiekie

Sitaleki ‘Ata’ata Finau was born in Masilamea, Tonga. He attended several primary schools at Te’ekiu, Nukunuku, Nuku’alofa and Toloa. He entered Tonga High School in 1961, and Auckland Grammar School in 1967. He later attended the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, graduating in 1975 from the School of Medicine, and in1981 graduated from the University of Otago, New Zealand with a Postgraduate Diploma of Community Health
. Since 1994, he has been a registered public health specialist in New Zealand, Australia and the Pacific.

He had since worked as: Assistant Professor for the University of Hawaii in Pohnpei; the Manager of Community Health Service for South Pacific Commission; Senior District Medical Officer and Public Health Specialist with the Remote Health Services and the Royal Australian Flying Doctors in Alice Spring, Central Australia; senior lecturer at the University of Auckland Medical school; and the Professor of Public Health at Fiji School of Medicine, Fiji in 2001 t0 2006. In June 2006 Professor Sitaleki became the Director of the Pasifika at Massey Strategy to put Pacificans in Massey University and Massey in and among the Pacific populations.Sitaleki is also interested in tennis, rugby, people, and food. He dabbles in writing of poetry and short stories mainly for his three children. He is passionate about all matters Pacific and cultural democracy.

Facebook

Roger Fowler – Papakura

Candidate 2013 – Roger & his wife Lyn have lived in Mangere East for 35 years, bringing up their family of four children and five mokopuna. Currently manager of the Mangere East Community Learning Centre, Roger has been a life-long community activist, and awarded a QSM 1999. A leading civil rights & peace advocate, & unionist since 1969. Occupations have included: bus driver, welder, & citizen journalist. Stood for the ARC in 2007, gaining nearly 11,000 votes in Manukau. Led many community campaigns including shutting down the polluting Airport incinerator. Editor of Fare Free NZ blog promoting free public transport, and Kia Ora Gaza website, Roger led two Kiwi delegations on humanitarian convoys to Gaza. He returned to Gaza on a fact-finding mission last November, & organized the NZ Conference on Palestine 2013. Working with MANA to transform Auckland into a vibrant city where the people & the environment always come first.

KIA ORA GAZA MISSION
Kia Ora Gaza is a New Zealand network dedicated to breaking the inhuman and illegal Israeli siege of Gaza by delivering humanitarian aid, fostering fraternal relations, enhancing understanding of Palestine and the Middle East, and cooperating with others who have similar aims.

Spoke at Socialist Aotearoa Conference 2013

Lisa Gibson – Tamaki

Member of the Tamaki Housing Group

Post on Socialist Aotearoa blog – We shall not be moved.

Spoke at Socialist Aotearoa Conference 2013

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUpi4BRNQ04

John Minto – Mt Roskill

Auckland mayoral candidate 2013 – John Minto for Mayor: “We need a Kiwi socialism”

A major goal of the Minto for Mayor campaign, John explains, is to change the perception of MANA as simply a Maori Party split, with Pakeha (European-ethnicity) leftists merely being supporters of Maori aspirations. John gives this as the reason why, in the last general election in 2011, “all of the MANA candidates in general seats bombed”, and only their main Maori spokesperson, Hone Harawira, was elected to Parliament.

Building “a broader base for MANA in Tamaki” is thus a crucial goal of the campaign. To this end, John mentions the role of revolutionary leftists – in particular the Socialist Aotearoa group – in his campaign, alongside single-issue activists such as the Tamaki Housing Group and some individual Green Party members.

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Makelesi Ngata – Upper Harbour

Candidate 2013  Auckland Council – Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board – Tamaki Subdivision – I was born and raised in Aotearoa (New Zealand), female and 36 years of age, Polynesian descent. I come from a very big but close knit family. I grew up in Glen Innes, from Madeline Avenue to Torrington Crescent. I attended Glen Taylor Primary School, then went on to attend Glen Innes Intermediate and finished my secondary school years at Glendowie College, landing my first job at 3 Guys as a checkout girl.

Studying in various tertiary institutions and working in different roles has taught me a lot, it is time to stand up and say “enough is enough”. Discrimination and segregation derives from unjust policies and unjust law; we need to learn from history, not repeat it! Implement a plan that is fair and just. We are not to ‘oppress but to progress’. The big picture is not to be exclusive but inclusive, regardless of race or social background.

Comment The Daily Blog: I totally support you Joe Carolan as we have one heck of a fight on our hands. In saying that the movement of the people have been fighting and supporting at grass roots level. Now that MP Hone Harawira is taking Mana to another level, politicians want to slam the new alliance. I say “grow up and get over it”! Move on because time waits for nobody nor does the Government’s selling of Aotearoa and the breed of merciless corporate corrupted bodied scumbags, that bring in oil rigs and evil mindsets of gentrification as we see evident today. People out there that still want to vote for National? Better check themselves before they wreck themselves. At the end of the day no kiwis will be able to afford homes in their own country. Let alone securing a job and having to pay back debt on student loans. So if you want all this to go away their is only one way to turn to the left! to the left!

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Pat O’Dea – Epsom

Mana candidate for Epsom 2011.

“Pat O’Dea is an Auckland based Socialist Worker activist and former Communist Party of New Zealand member. He is from an Irish Republican supporting family.” Source

Unity Aotearoa

Facebook Biography
Trade unionist, peace activist and land rights activist Pat O’Dea affectionately known as “protest pat” by his workmates is standing in Epsom where he intends use the electorate as a base to attack the right –wing polices advocated by ACT.

“Their policies designed to appeal to red-neck elements are racist and need to be challenged head on and this is exactly what MANA’s policies and people will do,” Mr O’Dea says.

James Papali’i – Mangere

Mr Papali’i also chaired the Mangere East Labour Branch Party for the past 15 years recently resigning to take up the challenge of standing for Mangere representing the Mana party. He is well known in the Mangere Community and he currently works voluntarily for the Samoan Fesoasoani Trust which was founded by Alan Tanuelu and his dad Thomas Papali’i who passed away in 2000. James currently works for M.U.M.A as their Kaitoko Whanau Worker in the areas of Mangere, Otahuhu and Papatoetoe. Source

GUEST BLOG: James Papali’i – Mangere Peace Festival

Joe Trinder – Manukau East

Candidate 2013 – I live in Mangere and am married with one daughter. I am an average Kiwi and work in Information Technology in the Security Industry. I am passionate about Manukau and want free public transport with free wifi. I want to build 20,000 Council rental homes, a living wage for Aucklanders of $18.40 an hour and Robin Hood rates.

Endorsed by Union Auckland.

Mana Party member Joe Trinder, who is contesting the Manukau ward, says he wants to launch a policy to discriminate against the big foreign restaurants.
He was impressed during a recent visit to San Francisco by the cheap, nutritious and healthy food options being offered by the Hispanic community.
But people in south Auckland are facing “death by fried chicken”, Mr Trinder, of Ngati Awa, says.
He says he would also like to get smaller, local businesses which sell fried chicken to change their menus to offer healthier food, such as burritos.

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See: SOCIALISM 2013 – Socialist Aotearoa Conference

12.00pm – 1.00pm | Te Kapehu Whetū: The Future of Mana
With: John Minto Mana’s Auckland Mayoral candidate; Lisa Gibson, Tamaki Makaurau chair; Roger Fowler, Mangere council candidate and Respect Our Community chair;