Smoking to be banned in cars with children in them

The Government has announced that they will introduce legislation that will ban smoking in cars that have children under 18 in them.

NZ Herald:  Smoking to be banned in cars when children under 18 are present, Govt announces

Smoking will be banned in cars when children under 18 are present minister, Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa has announced.

Vaping will also be included in the prohibition and it will apply to all vehicles both parked and on the move.

“Public education and social marketing campaigns over many years have had some impact, but the rate of reduction in children exposed to smoking in vehicles is slowing. It is now time to do more by legislating,” Salesa said.

She expected the Smoke-free Environments Act 1990 to be changed by the end of this year.

Once changed, police will be able to require people to stop smoking in their cars if children (under 18) are present.

They will also be able to use their discretion to give warnings, refer people to stop-smoking support services, or issue an infringement fee of $50.

It’s sad that a law for this is seen as necessary.

Will it be an effective deterrent? It’s still common to see people using cellphones while driving since that was made illegal.

New Zealand politicians as cars

From Reddit:

From comments:

The Andrew Little van is a Hiace, not aa Hilux.

Iain Lees-Galloway- Citroën Visa

  • Great to pick up dodgy looking hitchhikers in

  • Hard to maintain properly so doesn’t bother

  • Rear view mirror is great to groom beard in instead of reading boring files

  • Only a five seater but once crammed 11 people in and 3 on the roof

Iain Lees-Galloway – Chevrolet Corvair Gen I

  • Sharp looking

  • Not road-worthy

If David Seymour was a form of transport he would definitely be a new and untested, yet surprisingly feasible but also not entirely thought out form of transport.

Judith Collins is more a Ford Ranger.

Who’s the Outback/Legacy? Gotta be Bill English

Gareth Morgan – gen1 Toyota Prius

  • smug self-superiority and endless virtue signalling

  • thinks the only reason you don’t like him is because you hate the planet

  • actually a good idea with lots of positive hype, actually runs like shit when the chips are down

Some comment on Chloe Swarbrick:

I think this is a bit mean to Chloe, is she really that hated?

She’s completely my brand of politics but she still pisses me off. Would totally vote for her, regardless.

I think a lot of people like her (including me) but a few are pissed off, and I guess the creator just made everything about everyone more dramatic.

I wouldn’t say hated, but she slightly annoys me. I’d still vote for her, she has good ideas.

She’s a bit smug imo. As someone who voted green I would have rather had her further down the list to make room for the prior competent green MPs who didn’t make it back in like Mojo Mathers

I don’t hate her, I’m just bored and exasperated.

This must have been picked up from Facebook.

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, text

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, car and text

 

Dunedin City fraud

Otago Daily Times have combined information from a police investigation file released yesterday under an Official Information Act request and Deloitte’s full report (of their investigation) that was leaked to ODT last month.

Two escape Citifleet prosecution

A police report suggests Brent Bachop’s death and a right to silence may have helped two others escape prosecution following the Dunedin City Council’s $1.5 million Citifleet fraud.

The police investigation was launched last year after Deloitte found Mr Bachop, the former Citifleet team leader, to be at the centre of the decade-long fraud.

He was found to have sold 152 council vehicles, while pocketing proceeds, and police concluded in June there was insufficient evidence to charge anyone else in relation to the fraud.

But the police investigation file, released yesterday following an Official Information Act request, questions the actions of two other parties – a Dunedin car dealer and an unnamed woman – who were not charged.

There was evidence both parties had ”potential culpability”, one for receiving stolen goods and the other for conversion of a council vehicle.

However, the death of Mr Bachop – who was not named directly in the police report – and the right to silence meant both had a defence that could not be overcome, it said.

That conclusion came despite the actions of one of the parties – a salesman at an unnamed Dunedin car dealership – being considered ”highly suspicious”, the police report said.

The ODT goes on to explain the reasoning by the Police for not prosecuting, and they name the woman and the car dealership. They didn’t name the salesman himself but I’ve seen his identity revealed online previously.

While these two individuals have escaped prosecution the burden of their exposure as highly suspect will live with them.

And Dunedin City Council has a severely stained reputation on this as well. One hundred and fifty two cars not being accounted for over ten years shows extremely lax asset management. Several senior staff have resigned since this was publicised.

Stuff also reports: Police raised possibility of others involved in Dunedin City Council Citifleet fraud.

The police investigation followed a Deloitte’s report which suggested six potential areas of criminal activities: 152 missing vehicles, credit card/fuel card spending, purchase of a motorbike, council vehicle conversion and cashing cheques for refilling parking machines.

The subsequent police investigation was to determine if anyone other than Bachop was involved in fraudulent activity, and if anyone had culpability as to the offending, or as a receiver.

Police spoke to all but three of the people who bought one of the 152 vehicles. Those three people could not be traced.

“Almost without exception the purchasers of the vehicles stated that they believed (Bachop) was entitled to sell the vehicles and had no reason to believe that he was not forwarding their money onto council,” the report noted.

So it remains unknown whether any of the car purchasers had any inkling they were getting bargains at the expense of ratepayers or not.

And the ‘negligence’ of the Council is pointed out.

The report also concluded that the council’s finance department was “negligent” in the way they maintained the fixed asset register.

“There is no evidence that anyone deliberately turned a blind eye to the errors on the register, nor is there any evidence that anyone in the finance department would have any motivation to complicit in (name withheld) offending.”

Negligence is a mild description for a finance department that did not detect that an average of fifteen significant assets per year for ten years were disappearing from their books.

And this may not be all. The Council decided to not investigate further back than ten years due to difficulties in checking through records. What records? It’s basic stuff accounting for assets.

Brent Bachop took over management of Dunedin City’s vehicle fleet from someone who was referred to as ‘Arthur Daly’.

The known level of fraud and the lack of confidence that it was the only fraud is a very bad look for Dunedin.

We can only hope that the Council now has rock solid accounting and accountability.