A ‘top secret list’ of people being monitored by the police

This should be no surprise – Stuff reports that the police have a ‘top secret list’ (as it should be) of people they are monitoring, including “white supremacists, Muslim converts and people left disgruntled by the Christchurch terror attack” and “disaffected” people with firearm licences, and others with racist and radical views.

As long as there are genuine concerns about these people and the police are operating legally this should be a reassuring thing?

Stuff – Christchurch terror attack: More than 100 people being monitored by police

More than 100 people – including white supremacists, Muslim converts and people left disgruntled by the Christchurch terror attack – are being actively monitored by police.

Stuff has obtained part of a top secret list that names those who are of concern to police following the March 15 terror attack. Stuff has chosen not to name anyone on the list or contact them for security reasons.

It should be a given that Stuff doesn’t name anyone on the list, it would be highly reckless and inappropriate to do so.  Stuff seems have made a habit of praising themselves for doing what is expected (and required) of media.

The list, which is understood to have included more than 100 people, includes “disaffected” people with firearm licences, and others with racist and radical views. Police appear to be placing a large focus on social media, with one person making it onto the list for posting “concerning information”, including how to make their own live feed on social media.

Police deputy commissioner Mike Clement…

…told Stuff the operation was designed to reassure New Zealanders.

This includes raising awareness through increased visibility on the streets, and visits to thousands of schools, religious places, businesses and community centres.

“While the number of reports has increased since the Christchurch attack, fundamental to being safe and feeling safe is the willingness of people to report behaviours that concern them.

“As a result of the help of the community [we have] spoken with many individuals across New Zealand and in a few instances interventions including arrests have been undertaken.”

Canterbury district commander Superintendent John Price…

…also declined to comment on the list’s existence, but confirmed there was a group of people whose actions and behaviour had concerned police. He said the intelligence phase of the operation was focused on trying to understand other people who are of interest in the community.

“There may be some concerns around their ideologies, or the fact they may have access to illegal firearms, so that’s a large part of that, determining and then acting on that information”.

I think that if the police are aware of illegal firearms and access to them then they should be acting on that, not just monitoring them.

“A lot of it is generated through people telling us, looking through social media and other information streams that come into the mix. You scan your information sources, you then analyse those information sources and get to a point you can assess the risk of the threat level.”

“If we consider that people may have access to illegal firearms that would raise a concern, it may be that the people are expressing views that we may think is not aligned with our way as New Zealanders”.

“If we think there’s an inherent risk through that intel we will act on it depending on how considered the threat is to the community as a whole.”

Not surprisingly, there is nothing much new about this apart from increased efforts after the mosque killings.

The intelligence model was nothing new, with police regularly using it for other areas of heightened focus to establish more informed information, including family harm, burglaries, volume crime and organised crime.

Clement asked that people remained “vigilant”.

“Be aware of your surroundings and if you see something that doesn’t look right or is suspicious, report it to police. We would sooner investigate those concerns in a preventative way even if those concerns were unfounded.”

If any of your saw things said of concern online would you report it to the police?


More from Gezza:

A Wellington convert who describes himself as “probably the most radical Muslim” in the city says he is happy to co-operate with police and understands their concern.

The man, in his 30s, said he was probably on a top secret list, obtained by Stuff, that names some of more than 100 people police are monitoring since the March 15 attack.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/christchurch-shooting/112302738/radical-muslim-convert-happy-for-police-to-do-due-diligence

Alleged offences far more serious than downloading massacre footage

It isn’t surprising to see that one of the people charged with downloading footage of the Christchurch massacres is alleged to have committed more serious offences than just that.

Stuff: Teen on footage charge allegedly planned mass shooting at school

A high school student who allegedly downloaded footage of the Christchurch massacre also allegedly discussed plans of how best to conduct a mass shooting at his school with fellow students.

The 17-year-old appeared in the Hamilton District Court on Tuesday afternoon on a charge of possession of objectionable material, where he was granted interim name suppression.

The charge against the teenager reads that on April 8 at a location in the Waikato he, “without lawful authority or excuse, had in his possession an objectionable publication, namely camera footage of the Christchurch mosque shootings, knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that the publication is objectionable”.

The portion of the police summary that can be reported reveals that police allege they were called to the boy’s high school by the principal on Monday, after he was found to be in possession of a USB stick containing footage of the mass killings in Christchurch on March 15.

According to the police summary, he had allegedly been talking to other students about how easy it would be for a mass killing to take place at the school.

His alleged plan involved activating a fire alarm, which would prompt the students and staff to evacuate and congregate on the school fields, where they would be an easy target for a shooter.

The portions of the summary Bourke divulged in court also revealed the teenager had allegedly searched for footage of the Christchurch shooting using the Google search engine. However Google prevented this, so it is claimed he found “alternative ways” of accessing several files of the footage.

He allegedly showed the footage to other male students and the USB stick was passed around, however the teenager did not know whether any of those other students had made copies of the files.

So based on this there seems to be good cause for the police to have arrested and charged him.

Thousands of people will have accessed the video and the manifesto, and most of them won’t be investigated or charged. Only those who appear to pose more serious risks will (or should) attract the attention of the police.