Cannabis poll: high support for use, not for supply

The NZ Drug Foundation has just released the results of a cannabis poll, carried out from 2 July 2018 until 17 July 2018

Participants stated whether an activity should be illegal, decriminalised, or legal.

Growing and/or using cannabis for medical reasons if you have a terminal illness

  • 10% – illegal
  • 17%  – decriminalised.
  • 72%- legal

Growing and/or using cannabis for any medical reasons such as to alleviate pain

  • 13% – illegal
  • 17%  – decriminalised.
  • 70%- legal

So high support for use of cannabis for medical reasons.

Growing a small amount of cannabis for personal use

  • 38% – illegal
  • 29%  – decriminalised
  • 32%- legal

Possessing a small amount of cannabis for personal use

  • 31% – illegal
  • 32%  – decriminalised
  • 35%- legal

More wanting to keep it illegal for personal (recreational) use but still about two thirds in support for legal change.

Growing a small amount of cannabis for giving or selling to your friends

  • 69% – illegal
  • 18%  – decriminalised
  • 12%- legal

Selling cannabis from a store

  • 60% – illegal
  • 9%  – decriminalised.
  • 29%- legal

Here there is much higher support for staying illegal for ways of getting cannabis apart from growing your own.

Source: NZ Herald Cannabis issues poll

The poll was conducted by Curia Market Research

943 respondents agreed to participate out of a random selection of 15,000 phone numbers nationwide

Trump protests in London – exclusive coverage

Missy has provided coverage of protests against Donald Trump in London.

There were two protests today in London against Trump, both came past my work. I thought the first was big, but the second was massive in comparison.

Video – this starts looking up Haymarket swinging around to Trafalgar Square

Taken about 5 mins later is looking towards Trafalgar Square swinging back around to look up Haymarket.

This was a much bigger protest, we watched it for almost 2 hours from our building and it was still going when I left work.

It was estimated there were about 700,000 – 750,000 people in attendance. That is huge, many of my colleagues were saying it is the biggest protest they had seen in years (for some not since the Iraq War).

I am not sure how many of you are familiar with London, but essentially all of Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross Road on the other side and the Church steps appeared to be full, also it looked like people were crowding in down Northumberland Ave on the other side of Trafalgar Square as well – and Haymarket was also fill of people. To me it looked like more people than what has been there at New Year’s!

One thing that often gets overlooked in these protests is the tremendous pressure they put on the police services.

The police forces in the UK have over the years faced tremendous cuts, they are already stretched with the increase in violent crime and then these protests come along which require a huge police presence.

I am not saying that people should not protest, indeed in a modern democracy it is their right and whether we agree or not with their protests we should always support their democratic right to do so, but also these same people should keep in mind the pressure that is put on police resources when they do organise these large scale protests.

Today’s protests were well behaved, and good natured, indeed there was almost a carnival atmosphere and the police were being open and friendly, in fact the police officer who was directing the protestors was very good natured, in each and every megaphone announcement he began with ‘good afternoon lovely to see you…’ and he finished with ‘…have a lovely day’. I don’t think there is anywhere else in the world the police would be that polite at a protest – especially when the officer in question would be working two weeks without a day off because of the protest.

Earlier in the day I was talking to the officer who was on the megaphone, he was saying today was meant to be his day off, he had just come off seven days straight (three on night shift) and was about to go on eight days straight. He also stated he had been brought in from another borough (along with a number of his colleagues) leaving his borough less protected. Despite all this, and his obvious frustration, he still managed to keep good humour and be polite and friendly, including at one point saying hello (via the megaphone) and waving to me and my colleagues on the balcony at our work. I am in awe of these men and women who do these kind of jobs (whether they be police, fire, ambulance, defence etc) that work under such incredible pressure but still manage to put forward such a positive face to the public when most of us would probably be ready to lose our cool.

Also:

  • BBC: Trump’s UK visit and protests
    On the second day of his visit to the UK, President Trump has met Prime Minister Theresa May at Chequers and the Queen at Windsor Castle. A number of protests against his visit also took place. Here are the day’s events in pictures.
  • BBC: Aerial view of London protest
    Thousands of protesters are marching through central London in protest of Donald Trump’s visit.

And: Donald Trump: US-UK trade deal ‘absolutely possible’

A US-UK trade deal “will absolutely be possible”, Donald Trump has said, after he told The Sun Theresa May’s Brexit plan could kill an agreement.

Speaking after talks at Chequers, Mr Trump said the US-UK relationship is “the highest level of special”, while Mrs May said they had discussed plans for an “ambitious” trade agreement.

As usual Trump is all over the place on trade and on his wild swings from criticism to optimism and praise.