French outrage over Trump comments on Paris attack

President Trump has offended the French after making some typically bizarre comments in a speech to the National Rifle Association  in Dallas, Texas.

Trump is well known for making stupid and insensitive comments. This just adds to the list.

RNZ: French outrage after US President Trump mimics Paris attackers

What did Trump say exactly?

“Paris, France, has the toughest gun laws in the world…” he told the NRA.

“Nobody has guns in Paris, nobody, and we all remember more than 130 people, plus tremendous numbers of people that were horribly, horribly wounded. Did you notice that nobody ever talks about them?

“They were brutally killed by a small group of terrorists that had guns. They took their time and gunned them down one by one. Boom! Come over here. Boom! Come over here. Boom!

“But if one employee or just one patron had a gun, or if just one person in this room had been there with a gun, aimed at the opposite direction, the terrorists would have fled or been shot.”

The French foreign ministry…

…called for the victims’ memory to be respected.

“France expresses its firm disapproval of the comments by President Trump about the attacks of 13 November 2015 in Paris and asks for the memory of the victims to be respected,” the foreign ministry said.

François Hollande, who was French president at the time of the attacks…

…said Mr Trump’s remarks were “shameful”. They “said a lot about what he thinks of France and its values”, he added.

Manuel Valls, who was France’s prime minister in 2015…

…tweeted: “Indecent and incompetent. What more can I say?”

That may sum up Trump very well.

He also prompted responses from London after saying:

“I recently read a story that in London, which has unbelievably tough gun laws, a once very prestigious hospital, right in the middle, is like a warzone for horrible stabbing wounds,” he said. “Yes, that’s right, they don’t have guns, they have knives, and instead there’s blood all over the floors of this hospital. They say it’s as bad as a military warzone hospital.”

Trump stabbed the air several times with an imaginary knife and muttered: “Knives, knives, knives.

Guardian: Trump’s knife crime comments are ridiculous, says London surgeon

The suggestion by Donald Trump that guns are part of the solution to knife crime in London is ridiculous, a trauma surgeon in the capital has said. The US president told the National Rifle Association convention in Dallas on Friday that a “once very prestigious hospital” in London was like a “warzone”.

He appeared to be referring to reported comments by Martin Griffiths, a lead trauma surgeon at the Royal London hospital in Whitechapel, who likened the spate of stabbing victims coming through the doors to scenes in a military hospital.

Prof Karim Brohi, another surgeon at the hospital and the director of London’s major trauma system, said knife violence was a serious issue for London. “We are proud of the excellent trauma care we provide and of our violence reduction programmes,” he said in a statement on Saturday. “The Royal London hospital has cut the number of our young patients returning after further knife attacks from 45% to 1%.

“London hasn’t been used to that. They’re getting used to it. Pretty tough. We’re here today because we recognise a simple fact. The one thing that has always stood between the American people and the elimination of our second amendment rights has been conservatives in Congress willing to fight for those rights. We’re fighting.”

Charlie Falconer, a former justice secretary, said:

“Trump makes Londoners dislike him more, and the US dislike London more. Mutual dislike is not good as the UK leaves the EU. Trump gives the impression he couldn’t give a fig.”

Trump’s reception when he visits England in July was always expected to be far less receptive to him than the NRA or the staged ego stroking rallies he has in the US.

Ardern wearing a korowai in London

Jacinda Ardern got the full royal treatment by the Queen, Prince Charles, various leaders and the media covering her trip to the United Kingdom last week to attend a Commonwealth Heads of Government summit. At one event she wore a korowai (Māori cloak), which prompted mostly praise but also some criticism.

It’s hard to know what all that was supposed to mean.

BBC: Why Ardern’s Maori cloak, worn to meet the Queen, delighted New Zealand

When New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern wore a traditional Maori cloak to meet the Queen, it had quite a few people scratching their heads – and most New Zealanders glowing with pride.

It’s a korowai, a garment woven with feathers and steeped in history, tradition and cultural significance.

The photos of Ms Ardern wearing the korowai have generated a wave of pride, enthusiasm and support online, with people praising it as “stunning” and “beautiful”, while New Zealanders have been filled with pride and respect.

“It makes me really emotional,” Ranui Ngarimu, a senior weaver with the Nga Tahu Maori tribe, told the BBC. “It’s a real acknowledgment of the prestige and power of a woman.”

“To wear something that is so intrinsically of this place here, and for her to wear it at that event knowing that she would be photographed from every angle, that’s a real acknowledgment of her relationship with the Maori people and with New Zealand.

“Korowai are a very special form of cloak,” explains Vini Olsen-Reeder, himself a Maori and a lecturer at Victoria University. “There are lots of different kinds of cloaks, but the korowai is the one with the highest prestige.”

Traditionally, it would be awarded only to people from the upper echelons of Maori society, or given as a gift to people from outside the community if they were thought to be of equally high standing.

In this case the korowai was given to Ms Ardern by a Maori group in London, for her to wear at the Commonwealth Summit.

“The significance of the garment is the prestige that comes with it,” agrees Donna Campbell, lecturer in Maori studies at Waikato University in Hamilton.

“What it represents is the mana of a person, that’s the prestige and power of the person wearing it. So for Jacinda to be wearing it at this event is completely fits with the weight of the occasion; from a Maori point of view, this garment is entirely appropriate.”

It is not unprecedented for non Māori women to wear korowai:

Queen Elizabeth II wearing a korowai, 1954

Queen Elizabeth II wearing a korowai, 1954

Queen Elizabeth II was gifted a korowai (woven cloak) during her first tour of New Zealand in 1953–54. New Zealand does not have a specific national dress, but Māori cloaks are often worn by dignitaries as a symbol of the country.

There has been some criticism, like Cultural Appropriation Much? Jacinda Ardern’s Maori Cloak

Cultural appropriation is where the members of a dominant grouping in society use and – well, appropriate – take the signifiers of the culture of an oppressed or dispossessed part of society.

We do, after all, have to insist that the Maori are oppressed in New Zealand society. Absolutely nothing at all about politics there makes sense without agreeing with that point. Ardern is one of the oppressing class, descended as she is from Northern Europeans doing all that oppressing. And her wearing a Maori cloak is obviously appropriation from that non-dominant culture.

This also got an airing at Reddit:

Something I don’t see addressed here is the origin of the cloak, I work in an organisation with a strong Maori presence and culture, in many cases people outside of Maori culture in the organisation have been gifted similar items by the Maori people for their service, this is where it stops being appropriation and becomes appreciation.

If she bestowed it on herself or other white people bestowed it on her though then that’s a whole shit show.

While Ardern was given the korowai to wear on the occasion it is quite common seeing them worn at graduations, and you can ‘bestow a korowai on yourself’ – Academic Dress Hire: Korowai

We are now selling Korowai, which are stunning cloaks that look great on graduation day, and make a fantastic family heirloom. The cloaks come with an export certificate should you wish to take them overseas. The cloaks come in various colours and there is a significant amount of work that goes into each Korowai.

It is worn as a mantle of prestige and honor. Everyone has different reasons for wearing Korowai on their graduation day whether it be a sense of identity, a graduation acknowledgement, a congratulatory gift, a connection to our NZ heritage or family tradition.

We are pleased to offer them to you at $700.00 incl.

The Māori dictionary suggests that usage has changed over time.

1. (noun) cloak ornamented with black twisted tags or thrums – the illustration is of the korowai, Te Whiringa Rongomaiwhiti, woven by Gloria Taituha of Ngāti Maniapoto. The feathers of the korowai are of pūkeko (dark blue) and kererū (white).

2. (noun) cloak – in modern Māori this is sometimes used as a general term for cloaks made of muka (New Zealand flax fibre).

He whero ngā huruhuru o te taha whakararo o ngā parirau o te kākā. Ka rangaa he korowai mō te tāngata whakahirahira i ēnei huruhuru (Te Ara 2014). / The feathers under the wings of kākā are red. These feathers were woven into cloaks for important people.

Korowai became popular in the 1800s, and were made out of things like dog skins and the feathers of birds like kiwi, kererū , kākāpō, tūī, kākāriki and kākā. I presume they use other things now.

I guess the koro in korowai comes from ‘term of address to an older man’ and not ‘bay, cove, inlet’ or ‘noose’.

‘Wai’ can mean ‘water’, ‘stream, creek, river’, or ‘tears’.

What may stand out on this occasion is that the Prime Minister wore one at an overseas political summit. I can’t recall or find anything about John Key being given a korowai to wear. Neither Helen Clark, nor any other Prime Minister.

But Ardern seems to have quickly become the queen of symbolism. Time will tell whether she and her Government become known for substance on Māori and other issues – and that will need to be earned by Ardern, not gifted.

Big overseas trip for Ardern – and for the Government

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has set off on an international trip for a couple of weeks. It began with a visit to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast yesterday. She then goes to Europe to meet with the leaders of Germany and France, and then on to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in London.

She is also scheduled to visit the Queen – that’s right up Ardern’s celebrity PR style alley.

Trade will be high on Ardern’s political agenda.

It will be interesting to see how things play out here in her absence, given the difficult last month for the Government.

Craig McCulloch (RNZ): CHOGM great chance for PM to be gone

The trip comes at a pivotal time in international relations – roughly one year ahead of the United Kingdom’s final departure from the European Union. Much of the focus then will be on trade.

New Zealand is ready to jump into bed with the EU as soon as the member states hit the green-light on negotiations.

Officials here hope that could come in the next few months and former Trade Minister Todd McClay understands a date is set for late May.

As for the UK, it’s already signalled New Zealand will be one of the first cabs off the rank for a trade agreement.

But official negotiations can’t Bregin till Britain formally Brexits (sorry) in March next year.

At that point, the UK will go into a 21-month transition phase during which it can finally start negotiating deals.

CHOGM has always been regarded as one of the less-important global events – a bi-annual gab-fest between former British colonies.

…it’s the first since the Brexit vote and the first in London in more than three decades.

Leaders from all but two of the 53 Commonwealth countries are to attend. In previous years, as many as half didn’t turn up.

CHOGM is unlikely to hit many headlines.

The photo opportunities too will be priceless for the Prime Minister. Her media team will be hanging out for that shot of her alongside the similarly-youthful Emmanuel Macron. And don’t forget the Queen. Never forget the Queen.

The media are unlikely to let anyone forget the Queen, who is old enough to be Ardern’s grandmother. Irrelevant pap is likely to get the most attention.

Both Ms Ardern and Foreign Minister Winston Peters will use the opportunity to do the rounds and meet some new faces.

With both Ardern and Peters overseas (a problem when you have the deputy PM as Foreign Minister) who will be fronting up for the Government here?

Labours deputy leader Kelvin Davis? he has been virtually anonymous since performing poorly after his sudden promotion during the election campaign last year.

He may have done some homework since and be able to answer the occasional question. It will be interesting to see how he shapes up. he may get to be acting PM a bit over the next few months with Ardern out of action for a few weeks and Peters in charge but still with international duties.

Facts on US embassy move in London

After cancelling a visit to London to open the  new US embassy Donald Trump said:

“Reason I cancelled my trip to London is that I am not a big fan of the Obama Administration having sold perhaps the best located and finest embassy in London for ‘peanuts,’ only to build a new one in an off location for 1.2 billion dollars. Bad deal. Wanted me to cut ribbon-NO!”

Reuters looks at the facts in Was the sale of the U.S. embassy in London a ‘bad deal’ done for peanuts?

The old United States Embassy in London…

…was situated on a historic square in the exclusive Mayfair neighborhood, home to some of the city’s most valuable real estate.

The U.S. embassy has been based on the square since 1938 and the area was known as “Little America” during World War Two as General Dwight D. Eisenhower’s military headquarters were housed on the square.

 

In 2008, when George W. Bush was president…

…the United States signed a conditional agreement to acquire a site for the construction of a new embassy in the Nine Elms area of Wandsworth, southwest London.

The new 12-storey building on the south bank of the river is at the heart of a huge regeneration project in a former industrial zone.

In 2009…

…the US embassy building in Mayfair was listed as a Grade II building including for “special architectural interest for the strongly-articulated design and dynamic facades, well-detailed stonework and consistency of detail.”

This would make it difficult to make certain alterations to the building and can reduce the value of properties.

Lydia Muniz, director of the Bureau of Overseas Building Operations at the State Department, told the New York Times in 2015 that renovating the building would have cost $730 million and still would not have provided state-of-the-art security.

In 2009, when Barack Obama was president…

…the United States agreed to sell its embassy in Mayfair to the Gulf investor Qatari Diar for an undisclosed sum to help fund a new embassy.

The embassy says the new building was funded entirely by the proceeds of the sale of other U.S. government properties in London, not through appropriated funds.

So the old embassy wasn’t sold ‘for peanuts’.

The move was planned while George W Bush was president.

Washington Post adds: ‘As usual, he’s dead wrong’: Former U.S. ambassadors explain London Embassy move after Trump criticism

“As usual, he’s dead wrong,” said former ambassador Louis Susman, who served under the Obama administration between 2009 and 2013. “He’s 100 percent wrong.”

“We didn’t have a choice,” Susman said. “We had to move.”

The decision to move the embassy came down to practical concerns, the most important of which was safety. After the al-Qaeda bombings of U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya in 1998, the State Department imposed new safety standards that required embassies to be set back 100 feet from any adjacent roads due to the risk of car bombs and other attacks.

For embassies that were in densely populated neighborhoods like Mayfair, that posed a major problem and often necessitated a move.

The Grosvenor Square building was a particular problem. Not only was it a listed building, meaning that any alterations to its structure required approval from the British government, it is also in a dense area full of residential buildings. There were often long lines outside the building, and neighbors began to complain about the threat to their homes.

Bob Tuttle, who was served as U.S. ambassador to Britain from 2005 to 2009, said that when he was prepping for his confirmation hearing, it became apparent to him the embassy would need to move.

“There were two narrow side streets by the embassy. They are very slim, and if someone came down there with a truck, a la the Oklahoma City bombing, it would not only blow up half the embassy and kill half the people in it but it would also kill half the people in nearby residences.”

Realizing the high value of the properties, Tuttle said a decision was made to sell the 999-year lease to the embassy building.

Though Trump blamed the Obama administration for the “bad deal,” much of the work was done by Tuttle — a political appointee under the Bush administration.

Tuttle would go on to take the lead in finding a new location for an embassy, eventually looking at 60 to 70 different possibilities, while his Obama-appointed predecessor Susman arranged most of construction of the new building

“I’m very proud of what we did, and I think we did the right thing,” Tuttle said.

And the ambassador appointed by Trump also supports the move.

ROBERT JOHNSON US Ambassador (Evening Standard):  Our Nine Elms US embassy is the most advanced we’ve ever built

I agree with President Trump that Grosvenor Square, in the heart of London, was a perfect location for our embassy. Security concerns after September 11 meant we had to move to a location that could better protect American citizens and our British neighbours.

On Tuesday we will open the doors of our brand-new embassy to the general public in Nine Elms, a site selected under a previous administration.

…the new embassy is not just bigger, it is better and capable of meeting the complex challenges of the 21st century and beyond. It is the most secure, hi-tech and environmentally friendly embassy that the United States has ever built.

That couldn’t have been achieved in the old embassy building.

Purchased and built from the sale of our London properties, the new embassy did not cost the US taxpayer a cent. Yet is one of the most advanced embassies we have ever built.

That’s not an accident. The United States is re-investing in the Special Relationship. President Trump has told me he views the UK as one of the closest friends and partners of the American people we serve. Our new embassy reflects not just America’s special history with the UK but the special future ahead of us as we advance the prosperity and security of both our nations.

But not special enough for Trump to attend the official opening.

London Finsbury Park Mosque attack

Tensions have been raised and complicated by what is being treated as a terrorist attack with a van that hit people coming out of a mosque in London.

BBC:  ‘Major incident’ as van hits worshippers

Summary

  1. One man has died and 10 people have been injured
  2. Home Secretary Amber Rudd says it is being treated by police as a “terrorist incident”
  3. Muslim Council of Britain says van intentionally ran over worshippers
  4. A 48-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder
  5. The Metropolitan Police describe it as a “major incident”
  6. The area was busy with worshippers leaving evening prayers at Finsbury Park Mosque

Alleged attacker ‘acted alone’ – police

Asked about reports of a number of suspects running away from the van, the Met police said that was a key line of inquiry at the start of investigation.

“But from what we are seeing and what witnesses are reporting to us there was nobody else in the van, it appears that this time this attacker attacked alone,” Dep Asst Commissioner Basu said.

“This is not to say we are not investigating the full circumstances of how he came to be where he was but at this point in time there was nobody else in the van.”

Not the first terror attack against Muslims

This is not the first time that Muslims have been targeted in an apparent act of terrorism in the UK – and all the signs are that this terrible incident is nothing short of that.

The threat from extreme right-wing groups has been growing in recent years – 16% of all terror arrests in the year to March were classed as “domestic extremism”.

Those who have turned to violence have tended to go for visible Muslim targets – namely mosques.

In 2013 an extreme right-wing Ukrainian man murdered a Muslim grandfather in Birmingham and tried to bomb three mosques.

The following year saw the jailing for 10 years of a man from the north-west who was researching bomb-making and mosques to target.

And just last December the Home Secretary banned “National Action”, a group whose supporters have been investigated for planning violence.

It was probably just a matter of time before there was some sort of retaliatory attack in response to Muslim suicide attacks, but again innocent people have been targeted.

Difficult times for people in London and throughout England.

Any attack like this that targets random and innocent people must be condemned, no matter who the perpetrator is and no matter who the targets are.

 

24 story tower fire in London

A disaster has been unfolding in London overnight (afternoon NZ time) with a 24 story block of flats engulfed in flames.

The Telegraph  Grenfell Tower fire: Huge blaze engulfs London flats with people feared trapped

Where was the fire?

It took place in the 24-storey Grenfell Tower in Kensington, West London. The residential highrise was built in 1974 and contains 120 homes.

The fire broke out shortly before 1 am, with London Fire Brigade saying it was called at 12.54 am.

What caused it?

The cause of the fire is unknown. London mayor Sadiq Khan has said the fire has been declared a “major incident”.

How many people have been injured?

The picture is still unclear. Thirty people have been taken to five hospitals, but many people are understood to be accounted for.

Police have since said a number of people are being treated for a range of injuries. It is still unclear whether everybody has been evacuated and there are fears that some people could be trapped.

From reports it looks likely there could be a number of casualties.

London fire commissioner Dany Cotton’s statement:

This is an unprecedented incident. In my 29 years of being a firefighter I have never ever seen anything of this scale. Firefighters are working very hard at the moment.

This is a major fire that effected all floors of this 24 storey building from the second floor upwards. I have over 200 of my firefighters and officers attending this incident, with 40 fire engines and a range of specialist vehicles, including 14 fire rescue units. We declared this a major incident very early this morning … the first call coming in at 12.54. Our first fire engines were on the scene in under six minutes.

Crews wearing breathing apparatus and extended duration breathing apparatus have been working in extremely challenging and very difficult conditions to rescue people and bring this major fire under control.

London Ambulance Service have confirmed that 30 people have been taken to five hospitals.

I am very sad to confirm that there have been a number of fatalities. I cannot confirm the number at this time due to the size and complexity of this building. It would clearly be wrong for me to speculate further.

Equally the cause of this fire is not known at this stage.

We are working very closely with our colleagues in the Metropolitan Police and the London Ambulance Service to bring this situation under control.

Further information will be made available shortly including advice for those concerned about those who are working here and people who live her.

Police name London terrorists

From Missy:


Police have named two of the three terrorists who were part of Saturday night’s attack, including one that is being reported as being the Ring Leader.

The Telegraph: Khuram Butt and Rachid Redouane named as London Bridge terrorists – everything we know about them

The ringleader of the London Bridge terror attack who was photographed on the ground with canisters strapped to his body was today named by police as Khuram Butt

Butt, 27, of Barking, East London, is believed to have led the trio of terrorists who ploughed into pedestrians using a hired van, before stabbing revellers in pubs and bars on Saturday night.

Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley said Butt was known to police and MI5 but said there had been no evidence of “attack planning” and he had been deemed as a ‘low priority.’

A second man Rachid Redouane, 30, also from Barking was named by police as one of the other two attackers.  Redouane was unknown to police.  The third man is not a UK citizen.

Today it emerged that Butt had appeared in the Channel 4 documentary The Jihadis Next Door, which warned of the rise of extreme Islam in London.

Khuram Butt is another one that was known to police and had been reported to police, however, police say that whilst he was known there was no evidence of attack planning.

There are a lot of people saying that it is a failure of security services and police, but I think this case shows the complexity and difficulty there is in dealing with extremism.

If someone is reported the police can only watch them unless there is evidence that they have done – or are planning – something illegal. We can’t go around arresting people for what they think or believe. A lot of people believe things that would be considered radical extremism of some form or another, we see it every day on blogs and twitter, but we can’t round them all up based on what they believe – and I wouldn’t want to live in a society that does.

This leads me to another problem with these people, they aren’t using large networks, there are often no signs, or indications, of attack planning – all they need is a knife and a vehicle. This creates challenges for the security services that they are obviously still working through on how to manage – with tragic consequences.

Behind all of this the Security Services and police are very much constrained to a degree by legislation, especially in the EU which is very pro privacy and balks at a lot of state surveillance, and has strong beliefs in Human Rights regardless. I am not saying this is right or wrong, just the way it is.

The UK have been hamstrung with regards to dealing with known hate preachers and members of ISIS through the European Human Rights legislation, and the ECJ. There have been a number that they have been trying to deport – including ring leaders of the Rochdale sex abuse ring – but these people appeal to the European Courts and have their case upheld, meaning the UK can’t do anything about it.

This is a point many apologists for Islamic Extremism either don’t understand – or don’t want to understand. It is our liberal views on the world, our importance on Human Rights and Privacy, and our laws on racism and discrimination that they use against us for their own benefit allowing themselves to stay in the country.

And this makes me very angry, because these are the same people that are today slamming the Government for police cuts and not doing enough to stop terrorism, when it is THEIR liberal beliefs and opposition to the measures the Government might want to bring in that has contributed to the situation as much.

 

 

Theresa May: ‘enough is enough’

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has given a speech after the London terror attacks.

Guardian: Theresa May says ‘enough is enough’ after seven killed in London Bridge attack

Theresa May has warned that there has been “far too much tolerance of extremism” in the UK and, promised to step up the fight against Islamist terrorism after the London Bridge attack, saying “enough is enough”.

The prime minister set out plans to crack down on extremism after chairing a meeting of the Cobra committee following the attack in the centre of the capital in which seven people were killed by three attackers.

In a sombre address outside 10 Downing Street, May said internet companies must not allow extremism a place to exist, but added that there was also a need to tackle “safe spaces in the real world”, which would require “difficult” conversations.

The prime minister also suggested the idea of increased prison terms for terrorism offences, even relatively minor ones.

Islamist militancy was the thread that linked the otherwise unconnected attacks in London Bridge, Westminster and Manchester, she said.

“It is an ideology that is a perversion of Islam and a perversion of the truth,” she said. “Defeating this ideology is one of the great challenges of our time. But it cannot be defeated through military intervention alone.”

“It is time to say enough is enough. Everybody needs to go about their lives as they normally would. Our society should continue to function in accordance with our values. But when it comes to taking on extremism and terrorism, things need to change.”

May said the recent spate of attacks showed the UK was “experiencing a new trend in the threat we face”.

“As terrorism breeds terrorism and perpetrators are inspired to attack, not only on the basis of carefully constructed plots after years of planning and training, and not even as lone attackers radicalised online, but by copying one another and often using the crudest of means of attack.”

“While we have made significant progress in recent years, there is – to be frank – far too much tolerance of extremism in our country.”

“So we need to become far more robust in identifying it and stamping it out across the public sector and across society. That will require some difficult, and often embarrassing, conversations.

“But the whole of our country needs to come together to take on this extremism, and we need to live our lives not in a series of separated, segregated communities but as one truly United Kingdom.”

But an election is imminent (May has confirmed it won’t be postponed) and opponents have criticised May’s speech.

The statement’s content has concerned senior Labour figures who believe it is a breach of a cross-party agreement to put aside political campaigning and is insensitive to people only just discovering that they have lost loved ones.

The shadow foreign secretary, Emily Thornberry, said May’s statement appeared to be a breach of an agreement with Labour to put aside political campaigning until Sunday night.

Thornberry told BBC Radio 4’s The World This Weekend the statement was insensitive to the needs of those who were just becoming aware that their loved ones had died.

She said: “None of the things [May] is proposing in the four-point plan are immediate steps, and so I regret the timing of this. There is an agreement between the parties that there will not be party political campaigning until this evening or tomorrow.

“I think that [what May has said] is drawing us into a debate – I think there is time enough to discuss these issues. To come out on to the steps of 10 Downing Street immediately in the aftermath of a terrible outrage would not be something that would be expected.

“[May] has said ‘enough is enough’. Well I thought enough was enough after 9/11, I thought that enough was enough after 7/7. I didn’t think we should be taking any more of these attacks on our people, we all agree on that.

“We need to do more but we also need to be sensitive to the fact that there are people who are only just discovering that their loved ones have died.”

A very tense and difficult time in the UK.

Corbyn on London attacks

The BBC on Jeremy Corbyn’s response to the London terrorist attack.

‘They want our election to be halted’Commenting on his return to campaigning, Mr Corbyn said the election had now turned into more than a fight between the Tories and Labour, calling it a “struggle between terrorism and democracy itself”.

“The mass murderers who brought terror to our streets in London and Manchester want our election to be halted,” he said.

“They want democracy halted. They want their violence to overwhelm our right to vote in a fair and peaceful election and to go about our lives freely.

“That is why it would be completely wrong to postpone next Thursday’s vote, or to suspend our campaigning any longer.”

Corbyn: Police should ‘take whatever action is necessary’

Jeremy Corbyn has said Labour’s priority is public safety, pledging to “take whatever action is necessary and effective” to protect the UK.

He said he agreed with giving “full authority” to the police to use “whatever force is necessary to protect and save life, as they did last night [and] in Westminster in March”.

Mr Corbyn then reiterated his party’s manifesto pledge to recruit another 10,000 police officers.

And Corbyn has gone political on it too:

Can’t protect public ‘on the cheap’

In an attack on Theresa May, Mr Corbyn said “you cannot protect the public on the cheap” and called for the police and security services to “get the resources they need, not 20,000 police cuts.”

“Theresa May was warned by the Police Federation but she accused them of crying wolf”, he added.

The election is in a few days time.

Trump in London attack controversy

Donald Trump has become embroiled in disputes and controversies after tweeting about the London terror attacks.

From the Telegraph

A spat has broken out between Donald Trump, the Mayor of London, and other politicians over tweets sent by Donald Trump.

Sadie Khan’s statement this morning said that the Terrorists would not win, and that Londoners would see an increased police presence and not to be alarmed by it.

Trump responded by saying ‘At least 7 dead and 48 wounded in terror attack and Mayor of London says there is “no reason to be alarmed!”‘.

Trump got the message from Khan wrong – he was saying not to be alarmed at the extra police presence, some of which would be armed.

BBC: Mayor Sadiq Khan dismisses Trump criticism

The mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has dismissed criticism from US President Donald Trump over his response to Saturday’s terror attack.

The attack in London Bridge and Borough Market killed seven and injured 48.

Mr Trump accused Mr Khan of downplaying the attack by telling Londoners there was “no reason to be alarmed”.

Mr Khan’s team said he had “more important things to do than respond to Mr Trump”, who had “deliberately” taken his remarks “out of context”.

“The Mayor is busy working with the police, emergency services and the government to co-ordinate the response to this horrific and cowardly terrorist attack and provide leadership and reassurance to Londoners and visitors to our city,” Mr Khan’s spokesperson added.

On Saturday night, following the attack, Mr Trump tweeted a message of support to the UK, but also sparked controversy after he called for his travel ban on visitors from six predominantly Muslim countries to be upheld by US courts.

On Sunday, he criticised Mr Khan, writing: “At least 7 dead and 48 wounded in terror attack and Mayor of London says there is ‘no reason to be alarmed!'”

His tweet angered many in the UK, who pointed out Mr Khan had been referring to increased police numbers on the streets.

During an interview earlier on Sunday, Mr Khan had said: “Londoners will see an increased police presence today and over the course of the next few days. No reason to be alarmed.”

This has created controversy in the US:

Fox Insiders: CNN Host: Trump ‘A Piece of S–t’ for His Response to London Attack

The hosts of “Fox & Friends Weekend” blasted a CNN host for posting an expletive-laden tweet directed at President Trump, moments after the London terror attack unfolded.

Reza Aslan, an Iranian-American religious studies expert who hosts a Sunday program on the network, called Trump a “piece of [expletive]” for saying America must get “tough” on terror.”We need to be smart, vigilant and tough. We need the courts to give us back our rights. We need the Travel Ban as an extra level of safety,” Trump tweeted.

Aslan responded by calling Trump the obscenity, as well as an “embarrassment to America and a stain on the presidency.”

Previously, Trump retweeted an alert from Matt Drudge’s “Drudge Report” which said there had been a terror attack on the London Bridge.

Fox News: Trump assails ‘political correctness’ in tweet on terror attacks

“We must stop being politically correct and get down to the business of security for our people. If we don’t get smart it will only get worse,” Trump tweeted first.

Trump also posted on Twitter about the attacks: “Do you notice we are not having a gun debate right now? That’s because they used knives and a truck!”

It’s ok for Trump to tweet things as he sees them but not others? Aslan was not being very politically correct.

CNN: Trump criticized for tweet about London Mayor after attack

Trump’s tweets have been heavily criticized by a number of British politicians, who are currently preparing for the country’s general election which is scheduled to take place on Thursday.

Conservative politician Penny Mordaunt tweeted the transcript of Khan’s interview and said: “I’m standing with resilient London and him.”

Labour politician David Lammy said Trump’s tweet was “cheap, nasty and unbecoming of a national leader.”

Wes Streeting, another Labour politician, called for Trump’s state visit to Britain to be canceled.

Trump was also fiercely criticized by Brendon Cox, the husband of former British lawmaker Jo Cox, who was murdered by a right-wing fanatic in November 2016.

“You represent the worst of your country, @SadiqKhan represents some of the best of ours,” Cox wrote on Twitter.

Also from the US:

Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, ranking Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, said on CNN’s “State of the Union” that he had also been troubled by Trump’s tweets.

“I believe in many ways the Muslim-American community is better integrated into our society. I think that’s always been our secret sauce here,” Warner said. “That’s why it troubles me so much to see the type of tweets the President has put out in the last 12 hours or so.”