Barbecue ban would stretch out LPG resources

Barbecues may be completely banned this year.

For many years now open fire (wood or charcoal) barbecues have effectively been banned in most places – you need to get a fire permit to light one, and who can plan that far ahead with the fickleness of New Zealand weather?

The Government ban on new oil and gas exploration permits means that clean burning gas will be at a premium, with estimates that it may only last another seven years at current rates of use – see ‘Hasty’ lawmaking may lead to increased emissions.

Banning domestic LPG use – for most people this means gas for their barbecues – will stretch out the life of LPG for essential uses.

There should be an added benefit in further reductions in emissions, due to a reduction in males drinking (beverages with gas) and burping around the barbecues.

So a ban on barbecues would have a number of benefits for the environment.

But there could be a conflict with the Greens, if people are required to have gender equality in cooking time. Currently barbecues are the main avenue for males to cook, and that’s usually only in weekends.

There is a fear that without barbecues men might switch to cooking more baked beans, and that would just switch to a different emission problem.

The barbecue ban has been kept quiet for fear of another adverse effect – a rise in hot air on talkback radio.