State of National Emergency extended again

Separate to but associated with the Covid-19 Alert levels, the National State of Emergency has been extended for another week. It gives the State extra powers deemed necessary to deal with the pandemic.

“The powers activated by the State of National Emergency enable critical work to be carried out during this time including managing roads, traffic and public places; providing first aid, food, shelter and accommodation.

“Use of these powers has included authorising local councils to restrict vehicle access to roads or streets to support social distancing, directing freedom campers to relocate, requisitioning a carpark for COVID-19 testing, stopping people from lighting outdoor fires to reduce the risk of fire related emergencies, and allowing necessary maintenance to happen at a waste water treatment plant.”


State of National Emergency extended

The State of National Emergency to support the COVID-19 response will be extended a fifth time, for a further seven days.

The initial declaration was made on March 25, and the seven-day declaration can be extended as many times as necessary. It does not change the COVID-19 Alert Level.

“On the advice of the Director of Civil Defence Emergency Management and after consultation with the Prime Minister, I consider the State of National Emergency should remain in place to support the COVID-19 response,” Minister of Civil Defence Peeni Henare said.

“It is important that we continue to have the powers and support enabled by the State of National Emergency available as we transition to Alert Level 3 to help maintain the level of success we have seen to date in stopping the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

“The powers activated by the State of National Emergency enable critical work to be carried out during this time including managing roads, traffic and public places; providing first aid, food, shelter and accommodation.

“Use of these powers has included authorising local councils to restrict vehicle access to roads or streets to support social distancing, directing freedom campers to relocate, requisitioning a carpark for COVID-19 testing, stopping people from lighting outdoor fires to reduce the risk of fire related emergencies, and allowing necessary maintenance to happen at a waste water treatment plant.

“Since we went into lockdown most New Zealanders have done the right thing by following the rules and staying home. Getting this far has required a collective effort and we should be enormously proud of what we have achieved.

“So we do not lose the gains we have made, it is vital that everyone complies with all Alert Level 3 restrictions to support all New Zealanders to stay strong and help finish what we started – kia kaha Aotearoa,” Peeni Henare said.

The State of National Emergency and the COVID-19 Alert Levels are two distinct and separate things. The Alert Levels specify the range of measures that we are taking against COVID-19.

A State of National Emergency provides the people managing the response in an emergency, in this case COVID-19, access to powers they would not normally have, but might require now to implement and enforce these measures.

This declaration by the Minister of Civil Defence extending the State of National Emergency here: https://gazette.govt.nz/ .