Queen has approved suspension of UK Parliament

From Missy in London:


It’s all on now! The Government has asked the Queen to suspend Parliament shortly after they return from Summer recess with the Queen’s speech to be delivered on 14 October.

All eyes are on the Leader of the Opposition to see if he will call a vote of No Confidence next week, or bottle it again.

BBC:  Parliament to be suspended in September

Boris Johnson said a Queen’s Speech would take place after the suspension, on 14 October, to outline his “very exciting agenda”.

But it means the time MPs have to pass laws to stop a no-deal Brexit on 31 October would be cut.

House of Commons Speaker John Bercow said it was a “constitutional outrage”.

The Speaker, who does not traditionally comment on political announcements, continued: “However it is dressed up, it is blindingly obvious that the purpose of [suspending Parliament] now would be to stop [MPs] debating Brexit and performing its duty in shaping a course for the country.”

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: “Suspending Parliament is not acceptable, it is not on. What the prime minister is doing is a smash and grab on our democracy to force through a no deal,” he said.

He said when MPs return to the Commons next Tuesday, “the first thing we’ll do is attempt legislation to prevent what [the PM] is doing”, followed by a vote of no confidence “at some point”.

The Privy Council have announced that the Queen has approved the suspension of Parliament.

Note, this is a long overdue suspension of Parliament, the current session is the longest Parliamentary session (time Parliament has sat without a speech from the throne) since the civil war, and is not that unusual.

There is some debate on social media regarding the suspension time, some suggest that it will only be an extra 3 or 4 days as Parliament would have been suspended for the Party Conference season in a couple of weeks, however, others suggest that this close to Brexit Parliament would have voted to continue sitting and not suspend Parliament. It seems the PM has gazumped those that may have tried to sit through the Conference season.

 

Recommendation of no retrial for Teina Pora

The Privy Council has recommended that there be no retrial of Teina Pora.

Good.

Justice sometimes takes a long time, at great cost to the innocent.

Teina Pora convictions quashed

The privy council has quashed the Tenia Pora convictions. This isn’t a surprise, the more that came out the more of a travesty of justice it looked.

Teina Pora’s convictions quashed but no decision on a third trial

Teina Pora’s convictions for the rape and murder of Aucklander Susan Burdett 23 years ago have been quashed by the Privy Council in London.

In delivering the judgement tonight, Lord Kerr said the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council has concluded “there was a risk of a miscarriage of justice if Mr Pora’s convictions were allowed to stand”.

The Privy Council noted in its formal decision the now famous confessions Pora made to police.

It found: “The combination of Pora’s frequently contradictory and often implausible confessions and the recent diagnosis of his FASD [fetal alcohol spectrum disorder] leads to only one possible conclusion and that is that reliance on his confessions gives rise to a risk of a miscarriage of justice. On that account, his convictions must be quashed.”

The board is seeking submissions within four weeks on the issue of whether there ought to be a third trial for the 39-year-old.

Will the Crown ever admit the stuffed this case up? Now would be a good time.

Teina Pora’s lawyer: He’s probably the happiest man in the country tonight

Teina Pora’s lawyer says he is “absolutely delighted, as is Teina and as are his supporters” following the Privy Council’s decision.

The Privy Council in London tonight quashed Pora’s convictions for the murder and rape of Susan Burdett in south Auckland in 1992.

Pora’s lawyer Jonathan Krebs says his client was “initially speechless” when he learned he was now a free man and would no longer be subjected to “very strict parole conditions”.

“But as it sank in he’s probably the happiest man in the country tonight.

It’s good to see he’s finally got something to be happy about. And his lawyer…

He said the Privy Council had not automatically ordered a retrial, which he says usually happens in cases where a conviction is quashed on appeal.

“What they have done instead is called for submissions from the lawyers as to whether there should be a retrial and over the next four weeks we as a team will be working on those submissions and naturally our argument will be that there should be no retrial.”

It’s not over yet and it’s hard to see how Pora can have a normalish life of freedom, but I hope compensation from the Crown is sought.