2019 was second warmest year on record

The heating up of the world seems too be confirmed by 2019 records (and debate is likely to remain hot).

AFP: 2019 second hottest year on record

The year 2019 was the second hottest ever recorded and a virtual tie with 2016, the warmest El Nino year, the European Union’s climate monitor says in its round up of the hottest decade in history.

Data released by the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) showed that worldwide temperatures were just 0.04 degrees Celsius lower than 2016, when temperatures were boosted 0.12 degrees Celsius by a once-in-a-century El Nino natural weather event.

The five last years have been the hottest on record, and the period of 2010-2019 was the hottest decade since records began, C3S said.

Globally temperatures in 2019 were 0.6 Celsius warmer than the 1981-2010 average. Earth’s temperature over the last five years was 1.1C-1.2C warmer than pre-industrial times.

The year was just 0.04C cooler than 2016, which saw temperatures boosted by a once-in-a-century strength El Nino.

– ‘Alarming signs’ –

C3S also said that atmospheric carbon concentrations continued to rise in 2019, reaching their highest levels on record.

CO2 concentrations are now the highest they have been for at least 800,000 years.

Last year saw the most pronounced warming in Alaska and other parts of the Arctic, as well as large swathes of eastern and southern Europe, southern Africa, and Australia.

In Europe all seasons were warmer than average, with several countries registering both summer and winter temperature highs. December 2019 was 3.2C warmer than the 1981-2010 reference period, C3S said.

Australia was also three degrees hotter than historic averages in December, its Bureau of Meteorology said.

Drought and high temperatures in Australia have contributed to a catastrophic fire season which continue unabated – Fire danger increases again in Victoria as conditions worsen

Rising temperatures, dry lightning and a wind change are expected to cause fires to flare up and even spark new blazes this afternoon, as communities in East Gippsland and the north-east barely begin to count their losses.

Prior to 2019 being added to the warmest year records: The 10 Hottest Global Years on Record

The 10 Hottest Global Years on Record

2019 will add to that at just below 2016, making the ten hottest years now all in this century, with the five hottest being the last five years 2015-2019.

RNZ: The places in New Zealand for which 2019 was the warmest year on record

Parts of New Zealand experienced their warmest year on record in 2019, with some records going back more than a 150 years.

Across the country, the Chatham Islands lead the way, recording temperatures 1.7 degrees above average.

The Chathams started recording their temperatures in 1878, and have never had a year warmer than 2019.

Local fisherman Jamie Lanauze said kingfish, which were common further north, were being seen more often in the Chathams.

The islands weren’t wasn’t alone – Blenheim, Dunedin, Rotorua and Invercargill all had record years.

Back on the mainland near Dunedin – which also had its warmest year since records began 1867 – fishermen are noticing the changes.

Port Chalmers Fishermen’s Co-operative Society president Ant Smith said the fishing quota system needed to reflect the effects of climate change, and believed that was currently not the case.

In the deep south, Invercargill was one degree above it’s average temperature of 8.9 degrees, its warmest since year since records began in 1911.

Rising sea temperatures will have particularly affected the Chatham Islands.

The last five winters or so have been noticeably less cold (fewer frosts and snow) than in the past in Dunedin.

  • Chatham Islands 1.7 degrees above average (records began 1878)
  • Blenheim 1.2 degrees above average (records began 1932)
  • Dunedin 1.1 degrees above average (records began 1867)
  • Rotorua 1.1 degrees above average (records began 1886)
  • Invercargill 1.0 degree above average (records began 1911)