Fox promotes the violent left

Fox news has been pushing quite a bit on ‘left bad, right good’ following the shooting of Republican House Whip Steve Scalise by a Bernie Sanders supporter.

This is all on their current twitter feed:

That’s toned down?

They do have the occasional attempt on balance and conciliation:

But the division goes on. just tweeted:

Levels of rhetoric, division and violence look likely to continue unabated, despite what should have been a wake up call for politicians on both sides of the chasm.

Scalise shooting – unity and recriminations

It is no surprise to see condemnation of the shooting of the republican House Majority Whip Steve Scalise from across the political divide.

CNN: GOP House Whip Steve Scalise remains in critical condition

But there have already been political swipes.

Dan Balz: After the shootings, calls for unity amid recriminations and finger-pointing

In the charged environment of 2017, it took only a few hours for a baseball diamond to be transformed from a peaceful practice field to a horrific crime scene and then to a vivid symbol of the tensions between the angry politics of our time and the better angels of the American people.

From President Trump to congressional leaders of both parties to ordinary citizens came calls for prayers for the victims of the shootings in Alexandria, Va., praise for the Capitol Police officers who prevented an even worse tragedy and, above all, words of reconciliation and unity.

But barely on the edges of those remarks was another round of recriminations and a renewed debate about what has brought the country to a point of such division, what is to blame for what happened on that baseball field shortly after 7 a.m. Wednesday and what, if anything, can be done to lower temperatures for more than a few minutes.

Large taps of anger can’t be just turned off, even after wake up calls as serious as the shooting of a politician.

The country has been in this place before, perhaps too many times after violence that has left Americans feeling shaken and insecure. At those times, elected officials have reached across the aisle, embracing one another in friendship and unity. Ordinary citizens have rallied behind those leaders as one nation, vowing to put aside partisanship and recalling what it means to be an American.

The 911 attacks united and galvanised the country, for a while.

Trump spoke as other presidents have done in times of tragedy or terrorism, saying, “We are strongest when we are unified and when we work for the common good.”

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) called on his colleagues to set an example. “Show the world we are one House, the people’s House, united in our humanity,” he said.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) implored her colleagues to make the Congressional Baseball Game an occasion “that will bring us together and not separate us further.”

But their are too many people in the US with their own entrenched agendas.

But with past as prologue, other voices and other emotions threatened to drown out the words of the nation’s leaders. Six years ago, after the shootings that left then-Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) badly wounded and six others dead, it was the political right that was on the defensive.

Those on the left charged that the incendiary rhetoric aimed at then-President Barack Obama and his supporters during his early years in office gave rise to a climate that made violence possible.

But the sides have changed.

On Wednesday, it was the political left that became a target from some on the right. The gunman, James T. Hodgkinson III, who was pronounced dead at a hospital after the shootout, was a longtime critic of the Republicans and a particularly harsh critic of the president. His Facebook page included angry and vulgar words aimed at Trump.

Some Republicans viewed the shootings as evidence that the president’s critics have crossed the line of decency in their opposition and fostered a climate that could produce what happened on Wednesday morning.

Former House speaker Newt Gingrich and a strong supporter of Trump:

Speaking at midday on Fox News Channel, decried what he called “an increasing hostility on the left,” whether from comedians, from artists, from politicians or from ordinary citizens posting their views on social media.

“You’ve had a series of things that send signals that tell people it’s okay to hate Trump,” he said. “And now we’re supposed to rise above it?”

Some major irony there as he justifiably condemns hostility from the left against Trump, but ignores Trump’s own record of hostility against opponents and critics, notably but not only directed against Hillary Clinton – and also Trump’s deliberate efforts to stir up hatred against Clinton and promoting some fairly extreme consequences.

Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), whose many past statements have inflamed the debate about illegal immigration, was near the Capitol when the shootings took place.

Without referring to the shooter, he said critics of the president have created a climate of hate that threatens the country. He pointed to the massive demonstrations in Washington and elsewhere the day after Trump was inaugurated, and protests that have continued since.

Without referring to the shooter, he said critics of the president have created a climate of hate that threatens the country. He pointed to the massive demonstrations in Washington and elsewhere the day after Trump was inaugurated, and protests that have continued since.

“America has been divided, and the center of America is disappearing and the violence is appearing in the streets and it’s coming from the left,” he said.

Some of it is certainly coming from the left, but division and intolerance has also come from the right as well.

Just last week: Fearing for her life, Iowa Democrat abandons race to unseat GOP Rep. Steve King

The Democratic candidate running against anti-immigrant Republican Congressman Steve King (IA) announced Saturday that she is dropping out of the race for her own safety.

In a Facebook post published Saturday night, Kim Weaver wrote, “Over the last several weeks, I have been evaluating personal circumstances along with the political climate regarding this campaign. After much deliberation, I have determined that the best decision for me is to withdraw my candidacy for the US House race in Iowa’s 4th Congressional District.”

She explained that beginning during her 2016 campaign, she has been receiving threats of physical violence and murder, and said that “recent events at my home” were forcing her to re-evaluate her decision to run against King.

“While some may say enduring threats are just a part of running for office, my personal safety has increasingly become a concern,” Weaver said.

King didn’t mention this when criticising hostility from the left.

Back to the Balz article:

Rep. Rodney Davis (R-Ill.), whose district cuts across central Illinois to the Mississippi River just above Hodgkinson’s home town of Belleville, was on the baseball field when the shootings took place.

Davis condemned what he called “political, rhetorical terrorism” practiced by both sides. He appealed passionately for everyone to step back and find a better way to hash out and then resolve their differences.

“Is this America’s breaking point?” he asked on CNN. “It’s my breaking point. We’ve got to end this.”

But when it again becomes a blame game between left and right the end looks nowhere in sight.

Wednesday’s shootings can act as a temporary circuit breaker to some of the hostilities, and Thursday’s Congressional Baseball Game can become an emotional and poignant coming together.

But will that be enough to prevent a swift return to the kind of debilitating political conflict that has become so accepted as the norm? History shows how difficult that could be.

Some of the reactions to yesterday’s shooting also show how difficult it could be.

 

Mass shooting, but so what?

Five dead at a shooting in Mexico in a tourist town, at least one Kiwi present at the night club.

RNZ: Mexico shooting: Five dead in Playa del Carmen music festival nightclub shooting

At least five people have been killed, three of them foreigners, when a gunman opened fire outside the Blue Parrot nightclub in the Mexican resort town of Playa del Carmen during the BPM electronic music festival, police say.

More than 2000 people were said to be in the club at the time of the attack, many of them Australians. The festival is popular with foreign tourists.

In contrast to some shootings there doesn’t seem to have been any jumping to conclusions. Whale Oil hasn’t posted on it and there doesn’t seem to be any mention in comments – they mustn’t care about Mexicans and non-Israeli tourists.

Fort Lauderdale shooting

Here we go again.

Boston Globe: At least 5 people dead in Fla. airport shooting

At least five people are dead and eight are wounded after a shooting at a Fort Lauderdale airport, the Broward County sheriff’s office said Friday.

The shooter is in custody and appears to have acted alone, Broward County Mayor Barbara Sharief told CNN Friday.

“At this time the airport is shut down,” she said.

Eight people were injured and brought to the hospital, the sheriff’s office said in a tweet.

Motive currently unknown but there was one report that the killer was wearing a Star Wars t-shirt.

As usual the speculation is likely to run rampant ahead of facts becoming known.

See Missy’s comment here.

Telegraph live updates:

  • Shots fired in Fort Lauderdale airport
  • Five dead, 13 injured
  • Suspect named by Florida senator as Esteban Santiago, who had military ID
  • Terminal evacuated a second time 90 mins after first incident
  • People seen running across tarmac, crouching behind fire engines
  • Mayor of Broward County: ‘No second gunman’

UPDATE: There are now reports of a second shooter at Fort Lauderdale.

A sheriff is now being reported saying there was no second shooter.

It’s now being reported that the suspect flew into Fort Lauderdale from Alaska and picked up a checked-in bag containing firearm at the airport, and then started shooting. He apparently had a license to carry it (but not in flight).  With the proper paperwork for this is legal.

This may well force a rethink of the right to carry arms in the US. Or it should.

Update: there are now reports the suspect was involved in an altercation or argument on the flight before landing in Fort Lauderdale.

Attack in Munich

Several days after an attack in a train in Bavaria that injured several people before the attacker was shot dead there is news of a shooting in a shopping mall in Munich.

Spiegel Online: Tote in München – Polizei spricht von Terrorverdacht

Die Welt: München ruft “Sonderfall” wegen einer “Amoklage” aus

CNN: Munich shooting: Police operation underway, report says several killed at mall

A police operation is underway after gunfire erupted at a shopping center in Munich Friday. CNN affiliate NTV reports several are dead and others are wounded. Authorities shut down public transportation and warned people to stay home or seek protection.

Here’s what we know so far:

  • At least one shooter is still on the loose after a shooting inside a McDonald’s across from the Olympia shopping mall, police spokeswoman Claudia Küntzel said. “There could be several dead and one or even several shooters are on the loose,” Küntzel said. The shooting at the McDonald’s happened around 5:50 p.m. (11:50 a.m. ET), she said. It’s unclear whether shootings have occurred at other locations, and whether the gunfire has stopped.
  • Gunfire also broke out inside the mall, witnesses said.
  • On Facebook, police said gunfire was reported in several locations, and that witnesses report seeing three different people with firearms.
  • “At the moment, we have not been able to arrest any perpetrators. The manhunt is underway at high speed,” police said. “Because of the unclear situation we ask all people in the city area to stay at home or to look for protection in any nearby building. The operation of public transportation service has been stopped.”

Guardian: Munich shooting: at least three people killed – live updates

  • German interior ministry confirms three deaths
  • Witnesses report three gunmen in area around shopping centre
  • Authorities declare emergency and advise residents not to leave home

What I don’t know and I don’t know if anyone knows is whether the recent attacks in Nice, Wurzburg and now Munich have any connection as some sort of campaign, or whether they are a spate of individual attacks with one perhaps precipitating the next independently.

Newstalk ZB seem to be overhyping their headlines: Many killed in Munich shopping mall shooting

But: “German NTV is reporting the Bavarian interior ministry has confirmed three people have died in the shooting” and “German NTV is reporting the Bavarian interior ministry has confirmed three people have died in the shooting”.

Guardian updates:

Six dead, German police say
German police confirm that there was a shooting in Hanauer Street, adjacent to the shopping centre. Six people have been killed and an unknown number injured.

Police are now saying that there are nine people are dead. They do not know at this stage – and are checking – whether the additional person is one of the gunmen.

Asked if this was a terror attack, a police spokesman said: “If a man with a long gun in a shopping centre opens fire and eight people are dead, we have to work on the assumption that this was not a normal crime and was a terrorist act.”

He confirmed that the police were looking for three perpetrators and said officers were getting support from elite units but have not found any weapons.

Another death confirmed but a suggestion it could be an attacker.

There are now unconfirmed reports in local media that about 20 people are injured; some of them very gravely. Earlier, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, the German foreign minister, said that local authorities were doing all the could to save lives.

Guardian: Here’s where things stand at 3:30am GMT

Nine people were shot and killed, and a further 21 injured, in an attack at a shopping center in Munich on Friday evening
Despite early reports of multiple attackers, there was only one gunman, whom police identified as an 18-year-old with dual German and Iranian citizenship.
The gunman shot himself, bringing the death toll to ten
His motive is still “fully unknown”, the chief of Munich police told a press conference in the early hours of Saturday morning
Sixteen people remain in hospital, police said, three of whom are in “serious” condition

Another police shooting

For the second time this week the police have shot someone. The first was killed in a drug raid in Hamilton on Tuesday, and another was shot and seriously wounded in Rotorua yesterday.

Rotorua shooting: Tasered three times before being shot, police suspect man was high on methamphetamine

And this has already renewed debate about the arming of police officers.

Stuff: Two police shootings in a week renew calls to limit officers’ access to firearms

The latest figures released under the Official Information Act show police have shot 22 in the last decade – nine of them fatally.

Greg O’Connor from the NZ Police Association said the fatal police shooting of Nicholas Marshall in Hamilton Tuesday night was the end of an unfortunate spiral where a successful businessman’s life was destroyed by crystal meth.

Pepper spray and tasers were apparently ineffective. The armed man was running into a busy area in the middle of the day.

Police have a very difficult job to do, trying to protect the community against some of the worst and most dangerous people in our society. But it is always going to be contentious when someone is shot by the police.

I think it’s too soon to judge whether either shooting was justified or not. They will be investigated in time.

The figures show nine people were killed by police and another 13 people injured when police have discharged a firearm in the last 10 years. But police records only go back to 2007.

Professor Greg Newbold, a professor of sociology at Canterbury University, has been keeping his own records since 1941. His records detail the deaths of 34 people shot by police.

He also notes accidental killings by police including a choking in 1989, suffocation in 1994, running a man over with a car in 1994 and the 2009 killing where police shot bystander Halatau Naitoko, 17, at an AOS callout.

Since 2011, police have had firearms in all frontline vehicles. But routinely arming police on patrols is another step.

It has been claimed that drugs were significant factors in both this week’s shootings. Methamphetamine does seem to be a growing problem.

US police have killed more people in the last month than all New Zealand shootings since World War II. According to The Washington Post, US police have killed 518 people so far in 2016 and 990 people in 2015.

I’m not sure that using the US as a comparison is a good idea. We don’t want to go anywhere their level of firearm use by the police or by the public.

A Kiwi officer is justified in using “necessary force” to overcome someone resisting police unless a warrant, or process, can be carried out in a less violent manner or an arrest made by other reasonable means.

Should the police be routinely armed? Or should they use firearms less?

I think these are difficult questions to answer.

Parliament speaks on Orlando shooting

Rt Hon JOHN KEY (Prime Minister): I seek leave to move a motion without notice to express sympathy with the victims of the Orlando shooting.

Mr SPEAKER: Is there any objection to that course of action being followed? There is none.

Rt Hon JOHN KEY:

I move, That the House express sympathy with the victims of the Orlando shooting. This is a shocking atrocity, and on behalf of all New Zealanders, I would like to express our country’s sincere condolences to those affected by it.

As I said yesterday, no innocent person should have to worry about such violence when going about their daily lives or be persecuted for their beliefs or because of who they are.

The evening vigils that took place in Auckland, Wellington, and elsewhere were a tangible demonstration of the depth of people’s very real feelings at the scale of this atrocity.

Over the days and weeks ahead, we will learn more about the motivations behind this senseless tragedy, but right now there are many people grieving: the victims’ families and friends, and the gay and lesbian community in Florida and around the world.

All too often we see these hateful attacks and mass shootings taking the lives of innocent victims. New Zealand stands with the United States and other countries in the fight against violent extremism.

Yesterday I wrote to President Obama to express condolences on behalf of all New Zealanders.

Our thoughts are with the victims, their families and friends, and with those who responded to this tragic attack, and we wish those injured a speedy recovery.

ANDREW LITTLE (Leader of the Opposition):

The Labour Party joins with the Government in expressing its horror at this atrocity and its love and sympathy with the victims and their families. Our thoughts are with the people of Orlando and the United States, as well as their representatives here in New Zealand.

This was an atrocious and hateful act. It was an act of terror. It was also an act of hate. It was a targeted attack at the LGBTI community. It was the deliberate mass-murder of LGBTI people because of who they were and whom they loved.

These young people were attacked and murdered in a place that was meant to be safe for them. It was meant to be a haven where they could go to dance and have fun and be themselves. This was a place where they would not be subject to homophobia or violence or hatred. And in that place, in that sanctuary, they were murdered in cold blood.

Like millions of people around the word, we have all seen the heart-breaking details of what emerged about this shooting. The stories of first responders arriving at the scene to a chorus of ringing cellphones, as the families of those hurt and killed desperately tried to contact their loved ones.

The story of Eddie Justice, who was able to hide in the bathroom of the nightclub long enough to send his mother a text telling her that he loved her and whose mother then had to read the horrifying words: “He’s coming. I’m going to die.”

This attack has broken hearts around the world, but while we mourn and grieve, we must also rededicate ourselves to the great universal values of humanity, which attacks like this seek to deny and destroy: inclusion, openness, respect, love.

We must reaffirm our commitment to a society where everyone is free to love whom they choose, worship how they choose, and to be themselves without fear of violence or repression.

We must reaffirm our commitment to ending bigotry and intolerance and hatred wherever we find it, because that is what the path of true freedom demands.

While we grieve and we mourn, we remind ourselves that love is love and that love is stronger than hate, and that together we will not let hate win.

KEVIN HAGUE (Green):

I rise to support the Prime Minister’s motion and to thank him for it. The Green Party wishes to express its profound shock and sorrow at what has occurred, and its sympathies to the victims themselves, to their families, to their friends, and to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex communities in Orlando and around the world.

An attack against one of us is an attack against all of us. I want to name this as an act of homophobic violence.

For those of us who are in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex communities, we know that just below the level of taunts and name-calling and subtle prejudice, there is an undercurrent of violence.

In this particular case, in Orlando, America’s absurd gun laws have been a unique enabler for the mass murder that has occurred. But New Zealand also has a history of homophobic violence; one thinks, for example, of Jeff Whittington , who just over 17 years ago was murdered in this town.

It should not be that when I and my partner or any from our communities are out in public, we should have to check who is around before we kiss or hold hands, and yet it is so.

At this time I want to ask everyone in this House and everyone listening to this debate now to pay particular attention to the needs of young and vulnerable members of our communities.

For older members of the gay community, for example, like me, we have the privilege of being able to choose whom we associate with. We have the relative privilege of being able to make ourselves as safe as we can be.

But a younger person does not have that privilege. They are particularly vulnerable; they need our support and they need our love, right now.

I also want to extend a hand of friendship and of love to Muslim communities around the world. We understand that what this man did is not representative of your communities, and we seek relationships that are based on peace and mutual respect.

A belief that gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and intersex people are not entitled to what we call universal human rights, or, worse, a belief that we deserve death for being who we are, cannot be allowed to stand in the world.

In closing, we in the Green Party and, I hope, this House commit ourselves to act against homophobia and homophobic violence and, indeed, transphobic violence, wherever it occurs in the world, and we seek to be a constant voice in the world for universal respect for basic human rights. Thank you.

Peters:

Peters’ speech was widely regarded as highly inappropriate and disgraceful,  so the transcript won’t be posted.

He devoted most of his speech ignoring Orlando and trying to score political points on New Zealand immigration. About two MPs slow clapped his speech, it looks like he stunned or embarrassed even the NZ First MPs.

Hon TE URUROA FLAVELL (Co-Leader—Māori Party):

No transcript has been supplied by Parliament for Flavell’s speech.

Hon PETER DUNNE (Leader—United Future):

No words, no spin, and no gloss can carry over the events that occurred in Orlando yesterday. The slaughter of nearly 50 innocent people is unacceptable by any moral or ethical standard.

Equally unacceptable, I think, is the sort of intolerance and the bigotry—because that is what it is—that gets paraded at a time like this as people start to attempt to explain these unacceptable actions.

I believe that bigotry begets bigotry, and that in turn begets the type of extremism that we saw exemplified in Orlando yesterday.

This is not an issue where one makes a moral judgment about anybody. The fact is that these young gay and lesbian people were out socialising, something they should have been able to do in perfect freedom, in perfect security, and in perfect confidence.

A madman—because that is the one thing that is certain about the perpetrator—cruelly ended that, and the questions will go on for some time as to why and how.

There will be questions about the United States’ attitude to the possession of handguns. There will be questions about the motivation of the individual. None of those actually remove the tragedy of what happened. None of those restore any of those lives, rebuild any of those families or those friendships, or rebuild those shattered communities.

We are a long way away, and I am sure that the people of the United States are not sitting by their televisions now hanging on our every words, but our expression of sympathy and solidarity with them at this time of grief counts in that it shows that as members of the world community we actually share some basic values about integrity, we share some basic values about freedom, and we share some basic values about people being able to live their lives and express their personalities to the fullest extent.

Every time we see an event like this it is a challenge to all of those values that we hold dear, even if we may not be immediately near the scene of the crime.

So I share with others the sense of outrage and the expression of condolence and sympathy to the people of the United States, and Orlando in particular, on this horrific occasion. But to start to go beyond that to draw spurious conclusions at this early stage I simply think starts to light the fuse for the next horrible outrage, and that is unacceptable.

DAVID SEYMOUR (Leader—ACT):

I would like to add the ACT Party’s sympathy and condolences to those messages from other leaders who have made dignified and factual contributions to this debate.

It is a great tragedy, and our thoughts are with the victims, with their families, with their communities, and particularly with the LGBTI communities of Orlando, who appear to have been deliberately targeted.

Let us remain strong in the knowledge that free and open societies have the resilience to sustain these tragedies to support each other and to grow stronger again together. Thank you.

Gun law questions inevitable after shootings

It was inevitable that questions would be asked about our gun laws after the  Bay of Plenty shootings and siege.

I don’t know how tightening firearm laws would prevent isolated incidents like this. It’s impossible to predict which individuals might make stupid decisions.

Perhaps it’s more important to seriously reconsider our cannabis laws.

Stuff: Kawerau siege: Is it time to look at our gun laws?

While the Kawerau siege ended peacefully, the alleged shooting of four police officers has raised the issue of whether cops need better access to firearms, as well as questions about New Zealand’s gun culture. Can anything be done to stop similar situations?

The last major change to police firearms access came in 2012, when police were given access to a lock-box of firearms in every frontline car.

The Kawerau siege is not an ideal example for those pushing for easier police access to guns: the police shot were not unwitting constables taken by surprise, but members of the elite Armed Offenders Squad, sporting extensive training and body armour which saved their lives.

Tellingly, the idea of police officers toting guns on their hips isn’t a vote-winner, either with politicians or ordinary Kiwis.

But is it a vote loser?

And should votes be the deciding factor?

Police Association president Greg O’Connor, a long-term supporter of greater police access to guns, says talking about the topic now would distract from the main issue – how criminals are getting guns in the first place

O’Connor says no police officers are surprised by the Kawerau shooting, coming on the back of a notable rise in firearms-related incidents which police have faced in recent years.”There have been so many near-misses, so many times police officers have been shot at…this time, four officers weren’t lucky.”

He says the real arms race is taking place between criminals, with police the “collateral damage”.

But is ‘criminals getting guns’ the issue in the Kawerau incident?

I think one of the biggest questions from this shooting is:

Another issue which the Kawerau siege raises is the country’s drug laws, and the dangers that police face in enforcing them.

In Napier, Christchurch and Kawerau, it was a cannabis search or operation which led to a violent outcome in each case.

The amount of resources involved in policing cannabis and the risks involved should be balanced against the risk of using the drug – which are relatively low. Illegality aside cannabis causes far fewer problems than alcohol.

The Kawerau incident is more failed cannabis policies (political and police). Firearms were a prominent factor but gun laws don’t seem to be the issue here.

Four police shot

It has recently been reported that 3 police officers have been shot in the Bay of Plenty near Kawerau.

New Zealand Police
@nzpolice

Police can confirm a fourth officer was shot in this unfolding incident and is currently receiving medical treatment

Not good.

NZH: Police officers shot in Bay of Plenty

Four police officers have been shot during an armed incident at a rural property in the Bay of Plenty.

The injured officers had been taken to hospital and a “major police operation” is under way.

Cordons are in place at both ends of Onepu Spring Road, near Kawerau, and police were searching cars leaving the area, The Whakatane Beacon reports.

WHAT WE KNOW: 
* Four officers have been shot. They are being treated in hospital. Their injuries are not life-threatening.
* Cordons are in place at both ends of Onepu Spring Road, near Kawerau.
* Police are holding a press conference at 6pm.

From the media conference:

Police confirm 2 police officers have been shout and are in a stable condition, a third is in  a serious and stable condition, and the fourth officer has a minor hand injury.

The best information the police have is that it is a sole assailant who was at a rural property. No arrest yet, seems to be still being dealt with.

NZH update from 7:29: The scene remains a “live situation” with the shooter yet to be arrested.

Police UPDATE: Statement from Acting Commissioner, Mike Clement:

While Police staff work in a dynamic and at times dangerous environment, it is always distressing to us all when officers are injured while doing their duty to keep the community safe.

Police are still building a picture of the events around today’s incident, but here is some information we can provide:

At around 10.45am today, three shots were heard by Police staff who were in the Otakiri, Bay Of Plenty, area on an operation involving the use of aircraft.

At around 11.30am, another shot was fired at an aircraft being used by Police and armed Police staff then cordoned a rural property in Onepu Springs Road, Otakiri, about 70km from Rotorua.

AOS staff were then deployed from Rotorua and were in place at the address shortly after 1pm.

At around 3.45pm it was confirmed that three Police officers had been shot and injured at the address.

Our priority was then to ensure the safety of these injured staff and they were safely removed from the addresss and were transported to hospitals in Whakatane and Rotorua.

Two of the officers are in stable condition, a third is in a serious condition in hospital.

Following this event, a fourth officer also received a gunshot injury to their hand in a separate incident at the scene. He is currently receiving medical treatment.

Police are continuing to cordon and contain the situation, and we have more specialist armed staff on their way to assist. At this stage it is assumed that the alleged offender is still inside this address.

We have asked the New Zealand Defence Force for assistance and they have provided one NH-90 tactical lift helicopter and three Light Armoured Vehicles (LAVs).

In addition a no-fly zone is in place around the scene.

We are also providing close support to the injured officers and their families, and our thoughts are with them.

I can assure the public that there will be full and detailed investigation into today’s events. Members of the public are advised to avoid the area as there are a number of cordons in place.

The IPCA will also be advised.

 

Otago shooting threat – hoax or not it’s a problem

Yesterday an anonymous person posted a threat on the 4chan bulletin board of a shooting massacre at Otago University on Wednesday. It was then copied to Reddit and Facebook.

OtagoShootingThreat

Whether this is a stupid hoax or a serious threat it is causing a lot of problems and anxiety.

What is 4chan?

4chan is a simple image-based bulletin board where anyone can post comments and share images. There are boards dedicated to a variety of topics, from Japanese animation and culture to videogames, music, and photography. Users do not need to register an account before participating in the community.

Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured 17 at Virginia Tech in 2007.

This afternoon the police put out a statement:

Otago University threat

National News

Dunedin Police are aware of a threat made via an online post that relates to the University of Otago.

Specialist staff are actively investigating the post with assistance from the High Tech Crime Group in Wellington.  Police are also working closely with the Vice-Chancellor and the University.

“Police would like to reassure University staff and students, and the wider Dunedin community, that appropriate measures are being taken in relation to the post,” says Inspector Mel Aitken, acting Area Commander: Otago Coastal.

“Police take any threat seriously while its source and authenticity is being assessed.

“Our advice at this time is to be alert and vigilant but not alarmed while our investigation is ongoing.

“Police will be maintaining a high visibility presence in the area and taking other appropriate steps which we are unable to discuss publicly.

“We are also asking those in the University area to report any suspicious behaviour immediately to Police.

“We understand that a threat of this nature could be concerning to some people. Police, University of Otago and Campus Watch staff will be available to speak with anyone who has concerns.

“Police is experienced at assessing a range of threats and we investigate any matter of concern which comes to our attention. We are also mindful of the possibility of “copy cat” threats following high profile events which occur overseas.   We will deal firmly with any individuals associated with any such copy cat threats.

“Police will communicate any further advice necessary as our investigation progresses, and we will continue to work closely with the University of Otago.” said Inspector Aitken.

So will life go on as usual in Dunedin tomorrow? There are many students and staff at Otago, some of them will have some real concerns for obvious reasons. I know people personally with close associations with the University who have concerns.

Whatever the intent and motives of the person who posted the threat the effects of something like this can be huge.

It shows that in a normally boring old backwater like Dunedin one person can cause major problems without even doing anything real.

And if the person is serious the problems increase substantially.

A state of peaceful living can be easily and quickly be overturned.