Covid-19 world roundup

Get rid of ‘old stale’ ideas: Prime Minister wants a new way out of the COVID-19 crisis for Australia

Scott Morrison is ready to hear ideas for economic reform but is a long way away from choosing the path ahead.

The Prime Minister is in what some call a “harvesting phase” on big reform options like tax, industrial relations and deregulation.

He wants business and community groups to come up with proposals but is not going to be prescriptive about the solution – whether that means changes to workplace rules or a company tax cut.

Morrison’s message is not so concrete because nobody can be certain of the depth of the economic chasm the country is falling into. To be blunt: the country is yet to hit the bottom. Nobody can be certain of the scale of the reforms needed to lift the country out.

Countries are wary of relaxing restrictions too quickly.

Merkel warns Germany is on the ‘thinnest ice’ as Europe realizes social distancing is here to stay

Germany risks squandering the gains it has made in slowing down the spread of the novel coronavirus if the country opens up too quickly, Chancellor Angela Merkel warned, joining leaders across Europe who have cautioned that any easing of lockdown restrictions would likely be gradual.

The country is “still at the beginning” of the coronavirus crisis and will have to live with the virus for a long time, Merkel told Germany’s parliament. “Nobody likes to hear this but it is the truth. We are not living through the final phase of this crisis,” she added.
German federal and state governments recently agreed to loosen some of the social distancing restrictions implemented to combat Covid-19, including allowing smaller shops to reopen. But Merkel warned against moving too fast. “This interim result is fragile. We are on thin ice, one could even say on thinnest ice,” Merkel cautioned.

Germany has a relatively low death rate compared to neighbouring European countries.

Belgium has the highest death rate at 540 per million of population, total deaths 6,262 (their population is 11.5 million, 2.35 times New Zealand’s population).

First patients injected in UK vaccine trial

The first human trial in Europe of a coronavirus vaccine has begun in Oxford.

Two volunteers were injected, the first of more than 800 people recruited for the study.

Half will receive the Covid-19 vaccine, and half a control vaccine which protects against meningitis but not coronavirus.

Prof Gilbert previously said she was “80% confident” the vaccine would work, but now prefers not to put a figure on it, saying simply she is “very optimistic” about its chances.

EU leaders agree huge rescue package

A plan for injecting billions of euros of emergency aid into Europe’s struggling economies has been agreed by EU leaders.

At a video conference they agreed to set up a massive recovery fund, to be closely tied to the bloc’s seven-year budget. The European Commission now has to work out the details.

They also confirmed that €540bn (£470bn) of financial support would be released through existing mechanisms, to ease the economic pain caused by coronavirus, from 1 June.

European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said the future recovery fund would mobilise €1 trillion of investment.

Nearly 3 million New Yorkers have had coronavirus, antibody study suggests

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo revealed Thursday that preliminary results from a coronavirus antibody study show the statewide infection rate is 13.9 percent, which would mean around 2.7 million residents could have carried the disease.

“These are people who were infected and who developed the antibodies to fight the infection,” Cuomo said. “They had the virus, they developed the antibodies and they are now ‘recovered’.”

@NYGovCuoma:

Percent positive by demographic:

  • Female: 12%
  • Male: 15.9%
  • Asian: 11.7%
  • Black: 22.1%
  • Latino/Hispanic: 22.5%
  • Multi/None/Other: 22.8%
  • White: 9.1%

Another clash between Trump and a top official:  Trump disregards science as chaos overtakes coronavirus response

In another bizarre twist, Trump produced Robert Redfield, director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to walk back his remarks that the coronavirus challenge could be more difficult in the fall.

Trump claimed that Redfield had been “totally misquoted” by the media. But under questioning from reporters, Redfield confirmed that he had in fact made the remarks that angered Trump.

“I’m accurately quoted in The Washington Post,” he conceded, as Trump countered that the headline was wrong. It accurately described Redfield warning that if a coronavirus resurgence came at the same time as the flu season, hospitals could be overwhelmed.

The President also openly clashed with his top public health officials on the likelihood of the virus returning for another assault in the fall — saying only “embers” of disease were likely that could be easily put out.

And more mixed messages:

The President did break with Georgia’s Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, saying he “strongly disagrees” with aggressive plans to open businesses including hair salons on Friday as pro-Trump southern states look to ease stay-at-home orders.

But his rebuke followed days of Trump all but goading southern conservative states to open up, even though many don’t yet meet White House opening guidelines. And a source familiar with calls between Trump and Vice President Mike Pence and the Georgia governor said that both men expressed support and praise for Kemp’s move to reopen businesses.


The British government’s chief medical adviser says the restriction will likely last into next year, saying it would be “wholly unrealistic” to expect things to return to normal any time soon.

United States President Donald Trump says there is “pent up demand” to ease social restrictions, but has conceded the measures may need to stay in place until at least the summer.

https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/415014/covid-19-live-updates-from-new-zealand-and-around-the-world-on-24-april

Can chemtrails protect against vaccine injuries?

The Science Post: Chemtrails may protect against vaccine injuries, study finds

PROVIDENCE, RI – In a new study coming out of Brown University, researchers concluded that being sprayed with chemtrails actually has a positive effect when it comes to vaccine injuries.

“We sprayed chemtrails over 3 different cities in Rhode Island and then followed children in those cities for 4 years,” said Dr. Frank Defano. “We saw a strikingly lower rate of vaccine injuries in the children from the chemtrail laden cities than the normal population.”

While not all the data are available from the study just yet, it appears as though only 20% of the children who were severely sprayed with chemtrails ended up developing autism after their vaccines; a much lower rate than the 80% who normally get autism from vaccines.

Governments have been secretly spraying their own countries with toxic chemtrails for decades and it is only thanks to brave mavericks with the ability to make YouTube videos that the general population is finally being informed.

This news hasn’t been reported by Breitbart yet so Donald Trump hasn’t picked up on it.

It’s worth keeping an open mind about what one finds online.