Destiny Church demands access to prisons, Ministers respond

Brian Tamaki and his Destiny Church had a rally at Parliament demanding access to prisons with two programmes they have developed, but Tamaki has been told to go through the normal channels and make a formal application, and Minister of Corrections Kelvin Davis has made pointed response.

RNZ: Destiny Church rallies at Parliament for access to prisons

An estimated 2000 Destiny Church supporters rallied at Parliament this afternoon demanding access to prisons for their rehabilitation programmes, and millions of dollars in funding.

The leader of the church, Brian Tamaki, says his Man Up and Legacy programmes have helped hundreds of people turn their lives around, many of whom have spent years in the criminal justice system.

Man Up’s website describes the 15-week programme as a link to a ‘brotherhood’, which helps men identify and understand issues in their lives, and work through them for a more stable future.

The Corrections Department said it had never received a formal application from Destiny Church to deliver Man Up or Legacy in prisons.

The Justice Minister Andrew Little said the church had also never applied for funding.

“I’m not trying to point the finger of blame here, let’s just understand what it is that the issues are for [Mr Tamaki] and his Man Up programme and let’s see if we can pull something together which helps the government achieve its objectives which is reducing family violence and reducing the number of folks going to prison.”

The Employment Minister Willie Jackson said if the Destiny Church went through the proper channels then they could be able to get into prisons and get the funding they needed.

“I think that’s the problem here is that they actually haven’t gone through a formal process in terms of applications, so let’s see what they come up with.”

Brian Tamaki however appeared unwilling to play ball.

“Go through the channels? Well how come the Prime Minister can assign $30 million without even consulting to the Papua New Guinean Government and they misused it, and they have billions of dollars for pine trees and I’m talking about just a little bit of money for people.”

“I’ve been waiting for 20 years and I’m doing the business without taxpayers’ money.”

I guess tithing is different to taxing.

Kelvin Davis responded:

Tamaki says that not allowing his programmes to be used in prisons is a breach of human rights and a breach of the Treaty of Waitangi. He insists he has applied to have them be used.

 

Nation: Willie Jackson on Māori employment

Willie Jackson on Newshub Nation: Employment Minister Willie Jackson talks about his plans to get young people into work and how an economic slowdown could affect the Government’s goal to reduce unemployment to four percent.

Employment Minister Willie Jackson says he would like to get Māori unemployment down to 5%

“There’s statistics and then there are statistics” – Willie Jackson on referring to the unemployment stats for New Zealanders as a whole vs Māori.

Willie Jackson says it is appropriate for Meka Whaitiri to still be co-chair of the Māori caucus

PG raises eyebrows.

Peters pulls rank and blows off two Labour Māori MP initiatives

Winston Peters sounds like he is acting Prime Minister already, throwing cold water on two initiatives being promoted by Labour MPs, a bill to protect Māori seats, and aims to make Te Reo compulsory in schools.

Predictably, Rino Tirikatene’s Māori seats entrenchment bill drawn from the members’ ballot has a promise of failure with both National and NZ First indicating they won’t support it.

Stuff: A bill to entrench the Māori seats won’t get NZ First or National support

A Labour MP’s bill to entrench the seven Māori seats will not have the numbers to pass due to opposition from both NZ First and National.

Rino Tirikatene, who holds the Te Tai Tonga seat for Labour, had his member’s bill drawn out of the ballot last week.

His bill would give the seven Māori seats the same protection as the general seats, meaning a 75 per cent majority is needed to overturn them – currently Māori seats can be abolished with a majority of just 51 per cent.

But NZ First leader Winston Peters who campaigned on a referendum to abolish the Māori seats at last year’s election said his colleague Shane Jones’ position that neither he or any of the party’s MPs would vote in favour of it was a “fair summation”.

It’s understood the National Party also plans to oppose the bill – the Opposition’s position on the Māori seats is that they’ll stay as long as Māori want them but they don’t stand candidates in the seats.

The NZ First caucus will officially decide which way its voting when it meets next week but Peters said entrenching the Māori seats was “not part and parcel of any coalition agreement and we’re here to promote the coalition agreement we’ve got”.

“Views like (Tirikatene’s) can nevertheless be promoted by backbenchers but they cannot command the coalition agreement as a consequence,” Peters said.

Peters is deputy PM at the moment, but it sounds like he is practicing for when he takes over as acting PM next month.

And Labour MPs trying to talk up Te Reo in schools have been been told to ‘watch their words’ by Peters.

Stuff: Winston Peters on compulsory te reo talk: ‘If they want to be in this Government they’ll be on the same page’

NZ First leader Winston Peters says if Nanaia Mahuta and Willie Jackson want to be in the Government they will need to watch their words.

Māori Development Minister Mahuta said compulsory te reo in schools was a matter of “not if but going to be when” on Tuesday morning.

This was a slight shift from the Government’s current policy, which only calls for “universal availability” and integration of Te Reo into the primary school curriculum by 2025. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has specifically avoided the word “compulsory.”

Associate Māori Development Minister Willie Jackson made a similar slip up in December.

Peters, the deputy prime minister and leader of NZ First – who oppose compulsory te reo – issued a sharp rebuke towards Mahuta and Jackson on Tuesday afternoon.

“Neither of them are speaking for the Government policy full stop. If they want to be in this Government they’ll be on the same page.”

If he pushes his deputy weight around like this what will he be like as acting PM?

With Peters at apparent liberty to pick and choose what he won’t support this will make the Greens look like wimps if they roll over for NZ First and Labour and support the flawed and widely opposed waka jumping bill.

 

No Māori representation on Public Media Panel

National MP Nuk Korako has criticised the lack of Māori  representation on a public broadcasting ministerial advisory group, and Associate Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson hoped a Māori representative would be elected.

Korako has hit a raw nerve claiming Labour is paying lip service when it comes to its commitment to Māori, with Minister for Broadcasting Clare Curran saying she’s aware of criticisms.

Stuff:  National MP slams Public Media Advisory Board for lack of Māori representation

National MP Nuk Korako is slamming a public broadcasting ministerial advisory group for having no Māori representation.

The group has been established to investigate setting up a public media funding commission to advise parliament on the state of the media and resourcing needs of public media.

It’s a concern that there’s no Māori voice on the Public Media Panel, Korako says.

“Māori Television, Radio Waatea, Te Hiku Radio, all of these are actually reliant on public funds and they have not got a voice on this advisory group.”

Seems like a good point.

Minister for Broadcasting Clare Curran says she’s aware of National’s criticisms.

Curran says the panel of four has only had two meetings. Te Kāea has been told there is the possibility of another panel position.

“We’re open to adding a Māori representative on that panel,” she says.

It looks like someone has slipped up here.

Associate Minister for Māori Development Willie Jackson hoped a Māori representative would be elected.

Curran should be aware of more than National’s criticisms.

Labour met last night to discuss the future direction of the broadcasting space.

Curran says “We discussed a range of things- mainly big picture- around how we can work together, what some of the pressures are in Māori Broadcasting and right across the broadcasting sector.  We’re absolutely focused on how we can do things better. It’s still early days.”

Curran says she and Māori Broadcasting Minister Nanaia Mahuta expect to meet to discuss how they can work more closely in this space.

Including Māori input in the Public Media Panel would be a good start.

Accusations of Labour shielding Ministers from scrutiny in Parliament

Claims have been made that Labour is protecting some of it’s Ministers from scrutiny in Question Time in Parliament.

The second, directed at Minister of Employment Willie Jackson:

Question No. 11—Employment

11. Hon PAUL GOLDSMITH (National) to the Minister of Employment: Does he still stand by all of his statements?

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS (Minister of Education): on behalf of the Minister of Employment: Yes, in the context in which they were made.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: Does he stand by his statement in the Manukau Courier that there is a “crisis” in New Zealand employment?

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS: Yes.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: How many jobs has the New Zealand economy created in the past year while it has been in crisis?

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS: I don’t have those figures with me.

Jackson did front up for questions from Goldsmith the day before:

The first minister switch yesterday:

Question No. 10—Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media

MELISSA LEE (National): I seek leave for this question to be held over until the next question time when the Hon Clare Curran is available to answer this question.

Mr SPEAKER: Is there any objection to that? Yes, there is.

10. MELISSA LEE (National) to the Minister of Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media: Does she believe it is important for State-owned broadcasters to be independent?

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS (Leader of the House) on behalf of the Minister of Broadcasting, Communications and Digital Media: Yes.

Melissa Lee: Does she agree that maintaining the independence of Radio New Zealand includes full disclosure of any meetings the Minister has with RNZ’s head of content?

Hon CHRIS HIPKINS: Yes, and the Minister has corrected the written answer that she gave, which was referred to in the questions yesterday.

This follows Lee questioning Current on Tuesday:

 

Melissa Lee has been submitting many written questions to Curran.

Petty Parliament

Noted in Open Forum yesterday:

Gezza:

What a complete waste of taxpayers’ money by Labour members in the General Debate.
Instead of debating an issue of governance or legislative importance the tossers spent nearly all their time one after the spouting lame insulting jokes & putdowns with ludicrous speculations on who would be the next leader of the National Party.

Mefrostate:

I agree with you entirely. Far too much parliament time is wasted on cheap shots and distractions, and any Labour MP who has engaged in soapboxing about the National leadership race will lose respect in my eyes.

As an example I just watched Chris Hipkins and he spent an annoying two minutes grandstanding.

Hipkins is Leader of the House, so this is very poor from him, although to his credit he began by acknowledging Bill English:

I want to begin today by acknowledging the Rt Hon Bill English in his decision to stand down from Parliament after close to 28 years of service to this House and to the people of New Zealand. He deserves to be acknowledged. I haven’t always agreed with Bill English—in fact, I have probably disagreed with him more than I have agree with him—but I think he does deserve to be recognised for the service he has given to the people of New Zealand and for the determination that he has shown over that period of time through a number of ups and downs that he’s experienced in this House.

He then went on to shower praise on his Government, not mentioning the awkward situation of Partnership Schools that he is primarily responsible for.

Then he took shots and Nation MPs.

I do believe one of the things that was stated today by one of those contenders, Simon Bridges, when he said “I’m focused on Simon Bridges”. Everybody in the House will believe that Simon Bridges is focused on Simon Bridges. He clearly appears to be appealing to the young fogey contingent within the National Party; that’s his key demographic. A barbecue at Simon’s place has already had the desired effect: the vacancy has been created and he’s off.

It’s the same with Judith Collins. Now it will be interesting to see how Judith Collins fares. It’s a little bit like giving the wicketkeeper a bowl when you’re playing cricket. It means you’ve given up on winning the game. That would be what would happen if Judith Collins was to become the leader of the National Party. It would be like an admission of defeat and they just needed somebody to fill in the shoes.

There is, of course, Amy Adams. She is the ultimate compromise candidate: the worst of everything. She is the worst of everything: no values, no profile, and absolutely nothing that would be attractive to the voters. By the time Amy Adams is done preparing for her race, the race will be over, but she’s certainly in the running.

Then, of course, we’ve got Jonathan Coleman. I have been told on good authority that Jonathan Coleman has secured his first vote to be the leader of the National Party. It is his own, but he has at least determined that he is going to be voting for himself.

Then, of course, we’ve got Steven Joyce. He’s mulling it over. He’s just trying to figure out whether he’s got a ladder tall enough to get himself out of his $11 billion hole so that he can make a run for the top job of the National Party.

But then there is the mystery candidate out the back there: Mark Mitchell, who’s throwing his name into the ring. Mark Mitchell used to be dog handler. Now that could come in handy if he does succeed in becoming the next leader of the New Zealand National Party.

I feel like I’ve watched this movie before, as the National Party tears itself limb from limb as they decide who the next leader of their party is going to be. And it is nice to be part of a strong, cohesive, and unified Government that’s focused on delivering for New Zealanders. We have seen real results in the first three or four months that we have been in Government and we are barely getting warmed up.

This is quite ironic, given the amount of limb tearing Labour went through over their leadership for nearly nine years, and how weak and un-cohesive Labour was during much of that time.

Next up for Labour was Meka Whatiri (Associate Minister of Agriculture):

The first question, though, is what kind of track is this? Hard and fast? Soft and slow? A bit of bounce? That might let someone keen and unexpected charge through the field, like the old show pony “Craving Coleman”, bloodline out of “Naked Opportunity” and “Desperation”. He may still come out of nowhere to surprise, but he will break a leg and will then have to be put down, like the last time he ran.

Then we have “Crusher Collins” in the blue silks, who may also be guilty of interference when that two-year-old “Brylcreem Bridges” tries to pass her on the inside. Look for the illegal use of the whip.

Very silly stuff from the Minister of Customs and Associate Minister of Agriculture, Local Government and Crown/Māori Relations.

Gezza again:

True Mefro. Same. An illustration of the difference today. How have we ended up putting up with this sort of crap (from all parties at times) and paying them to waste time just playing silly buggers & spouting rubbish.

An illustration
Speech 7 – Labour – Jackson

Unbecoming of the Minister for Employment.

Speech 8 – National – Stanford

 I find it so interesting that the only thing the last three Labour MPs could speak about was the National Party leadership race. Do you know why that is? I’ll tell you why that is. That is because they are deflecting, because the issue of the day is charter schools and they don’t want to talk about it. They will do anything in their power not to talk about charter schools.

Stanford looked quite capable -and she showed the preceding Labour Ministers up.

She is a first term MP, taking over the safe East Coast Bays electorate when Murray McCully retired – she had previously worked for McCully in his electorate office, and before that has worked in export sales and producing local television shows. Too soon for her to stand for the leadership, and too soon to judge her capabilities, but she looks promising, especially in contrast to the Labour speakers before her.

The next Labour speaker, Willow-Jean Prime:

What I find interesting is that, in this general debate, I would have thought that the other side would have used this as an opportunity to do their speeches for the leadership campaign. I’m surprised, actually, that they didn’t. They are trying to find somebody who can match the very popular Jacinda Ardern, our current Prime Minister. They are trying to find somebody with youth. They are trying to find somebody who can appeal to a different generation. We’ve seen these tweets and these reports and these updates coming through.

What I challenge the other side to do is to find a leader who has as much heart as our Prime Minister has. We are a Government with heart, versus the Opposition.

Very ironic given the content of her fellow Labour MP’s speeches that did focus on the National leadership, that would hardly appeal to a different generation with heart.

Also guilty of dirty politics are several co-authors at The Standard who posted Who will be National’s next leader?

Mickysavage has built up some credibility with generally thoughtful and reasonable posts over the past year or two, but this drags him back down to trash talk level.

There are times in politics, like when another party is going through a process, that fools should not open their mouths to prove their pettiness.

It is a real shame to see Parliament’s General Debate wasted on petty, pathetic politics. It’s sadly no surprise to see The Standard stoop.

Shift from targeting Maori to targeting the poverty

Bryce Edwards looks at a shift in Government shifting from race-based (Maori) targeting to a more universal approach to dealing with poverty, but they say that as Maori feature in the deprivation statistics they should benefit the most.

Is this related to Winston Peters’ past attacks on Whanau Ora, with Labour now quietly accommodating his preference away from targeting Maori? Where do the Greens stand? Quietly on the sideline?

NZ Herald: The real political controversy of Waitangi 2018

Lost amongst the focus on BBQs, relentless positivity, and eloquent speeches at Waitangi, a fascinating and important shift in Government-Maori relations appeared to be underway. Labour and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern have been signalling that this Government is departing from the traditional culturalist and “race-based” approach to dealing with Maori deprivation and economic inequality.

Instead, a more universal, economic-focused method will be used. The conventional approach of advancing Maori aspirations was epitomised by the Maori Party’s focus on culture, race, and sovereignty issues, and it appears to be on the way out.

Heralding what may be a highly controversial approach to “closing the gaps” in terms of Maori inequality, Jacinda Ardern made her most important speech at Waitangi by stating that the new Government would take a universalistic approach to inequality – by targeting everyone at the bottom, rather than specifically targeting Maori.

Jacinda Ardern strongly emphasised the need to deal with the long list of social ills that have a disproportionate impact on Maori, but signalled that race-based methods were not the best way of moving forward.

Since then, the Finance Minister has confirmed this shift in approach to dealing with inequality. In an interview with Morning Report’s Guyon Espiner on Wednesday, Grant Robertson responded to questions about whether the Government would specifically target Maori in its programmes, saying: “Our focus is on reducing inequality overall” – you can listen to the six-minute interview here: Global market dive: Grant Robertson optimistic.

Espiner sought clarification: “So there won’t be a specific Closing the Gaps type programme that we saw under Helen Clark? We’re not looking at heading off down that path?” Robertson replied: “That’s not the approach that we are taking. But we believe that we will be able to lift a significant number of Maori out of poverty, and increase employment outcomes, because of the approach we are taking.”

Robertson went on to explain that the Government would keep some targeted funding for Maori, but stressed that a more universal approach would dominate:

“Maori will benefit disproportionally from the families package – from those payments, because at the moment, unfortunately, Maori appear in those negative statistics. We’ve got a range of programmes coming down the line that will support Maori and the wider population as well. Where it’s appropriate, where there are programmes – particularly in an area like Corrections – where we know that we can have a real impact on that Maori prison population, then we’ll have a look at them.

“Similarly, with employment programmes. But in the end, Guyon, this is about reducing inequality overall. It’s about providing opportunities for all young people – and we know that Maori will benefit more from that, because unfortunately they are in those negative statistics.”

Essentially, this new approach means directing resources and solutions to poor Maori “because they are poor” rather than “because they are Maori”.

This isn’t popular with some Labour Maori:

In RNZ interviews following on from Robertson’s, both Willie Jackson and John Tamihere reacted negatively against the notion that the Government was shifting in this direction – you can listen to the interviews with Jackson and Tamihere.

Jackson is a Labour MP.

Nor with the Maori ‘elite’:

The Government’s shift away from focusing on iwi property rights has also been signaled by Regional Development Minister Shane Jones. Sam Sachdeva reports: “Whereas English and his predecessor John Key seemed to focus on Article Two of the Treaty of Waitangi and property rights, Jones says the new government will have a greater emphasis on Article Three and the entitlements, rights and obligations of citizenship” – see: A fresh start at Waitangi?.

This might all end up in legal fights. 1News has obtained the letter from iwi leaders to the prime minister complaining about their change in direction, and threatening Supreme Court action if iwi rights to freshwater were not addressed – see TVNZ: Iwi leaders unhappy issues like water ownership aren’t on new Government’s radar.

An interesting observation:

There was nothing about this in the Labour-NZ First coalition agreement.

I wonder what the Greens think. And I wonder how much they have been consulted.

From Green policy: “We would continue to support and strengthen Whānau Ora”

Below average response on average wage

Minister of Employment Willie Jackson got caught out with a basic question for his portfolio today in Parliament.

The original question “Does he stand by his statement in the Manukau Courier, “for 9 years we’ve had Government policy which has offered up little more than lip service to job creation”; if so, can he confirm that in the past 2 years an average of more than 10,000 jobs a month have been created in this country?”

Jackson began with some very general responses to specific questions. Then:

Hon Paul Goldsmith: What is the current average wage?

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: At the moment we know what the average wage is, and that MP needs to do some research.

A very ironic reply.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker.

Mr SPEAKER: Is it a point of order on me for allowing the question?

Hon Paul Goldsmith: No, it’s just I’d like to have an answer. I asked a very simple question and I didn’t get any answer.

Mr SPEAKER: Yes, and I’m not sure of its relationship with the original question.

Hon Gerry Brownlee: I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. I assume you are considering whether or not you will act on that point of order? I mean, to—

Mr SPEAKER: I am considering.

Hon Gerry Brownlee: You are? OK. Well, we we’ll be quiet until we’ve had a bit of consideration.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: For the Minister’s information, the average wage is nearly 60,000 a year—a 28 percent increase on 9 years ago, which is twice the rate of employment. And so, given that, what would his target be for increasing the average wage?

Mr SPEAKER: I would have given some extra questions if in fact we had a question. We did at the end, so what we’re going to do is we’re going to have the Hon Willie Jackson answer that question, but I do want both sides to settle down, and I especially want questions not to have prefaces.

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: Sorry, Mr Speaker. What was the question again?

Mr SPEAKER: Well, I think if the Hon Paul Goldsmith just does the tail end of what he said before.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: So my question to the Minister is: what is his target for increasing the average wage?

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: Our target is to create real jobs with dignity amongst our communities. This is an Opposition that has forgotten a big group of people in New Zealand: the Māori nation and the Pacific Island nation. Shame on you.

Another vague response.

 

Audrey Young: Willie Jackson gets caught out on basic question

It is was a simple question that required a simple answer but Willie Jackson was left exposed and learned a basic lesson as Employment Minister.

National MPs hooted in delight at the fact-free answer and Labour MPs looked unamused.

Clare Curran, sitting in front of Jackson, turned around and muttered something.

Kieran McAnulty sitting nearby pulled out an iPad mini and started frenetically tapping, presumably into Google, but Goldsmith beat him to it.

Goldsmith: “For the minister’s information the average wage is nearly $60,000, 28 per cent increase on nine years ago.”

Jackson’s defence to being caught out was to come back fighting.

More transcript:

Paul Eagle: What has the Minister seen that highlights that the creation of jobs for Māori and Pasifika people are lagging behind those of others?

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: I’ve seen the recent unemployment figures that show under the previous Government Māori and Pasifika people were more than two times more likely to be unemployed than others, and that highlights that the job creation under the previous Government left parts of our community unacceptably behind.

Paul Eagle: What other examples has the Minister seen of lip-service to job creation?

Mr SPEAKER: The member will resume his seat. That is not a supplementary question.

Hon Paul Goldsmith: When he wrote “I’m Minister of Employment to make a real difference, not appease easy stereotypes and lazy journalism”, which journalists did he think were being lazy?

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: There are many fine journalists, particularly the ones who write negative articles about the Opposition.

Hon Iain Lees-Galloway: What impact does he anticipate the Government’s plan to progressively raise the minimum wage to $20 per hour and to enhance workers’ bargaining position in the workplace will have on average wages?

Hon WILLIE JACKSON: Huge, huge impact—huge impact. Workers are so happy with the changes at the moment, particularly after being under attack for the last nine years from a disgraceful Government.

He tried to snap back but the damage had been done.

Full transcript here.

Median salaries by job type here at PayScale.

 

Addressing unemployment stressed by factions

Shane Jones’ push for ‘work-for-the-dole’ schemes to get people off couches and into work has highlighted a number factions that put stress on any policy making and implementing.

The factions include:

  • NZ First Party
  • Labour Party
  • Maori MPs
  • Unions
  • Green Party

Jacinda Ardern has to somehow try to manage all of their interests and mould it into an effective policy to address generational unemployment, especially Maori unemployment.

Richard Harman at Politik: Willie Jackson: Working for dole won’t work

Employment Minister Willie Jackson says he shares Shane Jones’ passion to get Maori unemployment down and he has proposed a package of measures in a paper to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to address the issue.

He met Jones yesterday and agreed to incorporate some of Jones’ ideas in his paper.

But he says he stops short at Jones’ “work for the dole” proposals.

And he says that idea would never be accepted by Labour or “the boss” – Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern.

An idea that also wouldn’t be acceptable to unions, which Labour rely on for funding and support.

Jones’ language was probably provoked by a desire by NZ First to brand themselves as distinct to Labour.

But the imperative for Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is to maintain a seamless unity between Labour and NZ First.

And the Maori caucus and the unions.

So at her post-Cabinet press conference yesterday she said that what Jones was calling “work for the dole”, Labour was calling “ready for work.”

We are essentially talking about the same thing,” she said.

Asked about Jones’ proposal to end dole payments if unemployed didn’t take up jobs she said there already was a sanctions regime in the welfare system.

“That’s provided us with the tools to ensure that people do take up the job opportunities that are available to them.”

The Green Party is strongly opposed to sanctions, another complicating factor.

Jackson though wants to see an employment strategy which strengthens communities and provides real jobs.

“You don’t fix unemployment by following Jonesy’s idea and chucking a few Maori out there cutting scrub for a few months,” he told POLITIK.

“You have to create a real job, jobs with dignity, by forming relationships with local Maori, with trade unions, with businesses.

But these are only minor differences between the two Maori MPs.

“I can work hand and hand with Jonesy,” said Jackson.

“The thing is we have seen inter generational unemployment; both of us.

“I’ve seen it in the urban sense, he’s seen it in the north.

“We are both of the same mind and the same sentiment. It’s just Jonesy has got his own way of expressing things.

“But his sentiment is right; his passion is right, but we have to be careful that we are not penalising our own.

“We came into this Government to offer hope to our people.”

‘Our people’ being Maori people, who have three times the unemployment rate of non-Maori. Jackson and Jones are capable of putting their interests ahead of their parties, but need the MPs of three parties to back their schemes to get people into work.

It will be a challenge, especially with the politics involved, but some sort of solutions need to be tried.

 

Q+A: Labour’s Maori campaign launch

On Q+A this morning:

Labour list hopeful Willie Jackson and Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis ahead of Labour’s Māori campaign launch.

Jackson also had an airing on The Nation yesterday.

Newstalk ZB:  Labour threatens Māori Party with electoral annihilation

Labour’s threatening to wipe the Māori Party off the map, but the Māori Party’s star candidate is calling it an empty threat.

The Labour Party is launching its Māori electorate campaign and a Māori housing policy at Nga Whare Waatea Marae in south Auckland this morning.

They’ve enlisted former TV weatherman Tamati Coffey to stand against Māori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell in Waiariki. It’s the party’s only electorate seat.

Willie Jackson, who is running Labour’s Māori campaign, believes their days in parliament will be numbered if Flavell loses the seat.

“The reality is you can carry on, but their days in parliament will just about be over if they lost the Waiariki seat,” Jackson said.

But the Māori Party’s Shane Taurima, who is running in Tāmaki Makaurau, says his door knocking suggests otherwise.

“I guarantee you there is a big gap between Te Ururoa Flavell and Tamati Coffey in the Waiariki seat,” Taurima said.

Willie Jackson has also made a plea to the Green Party to extend their election alliance to Māori seats, after Greens co-leader Metiria Turei ruled out striking a deal.

Jackson argues that if the Greens want to change the government they shouldn’t be contesting the Māori seats that Labour needs to win.

On The Nation:

Lisa Owen: Let’s talk about you, though. Labour and the Maori seats. Aren’t you worried that your friends in the Green Party could split the vote in some of those seats?

Willie Jackson: Having a talk to them now. Am talking to some of the individuals in the Green Party.

Lisa Owen: What are you saying to them about that, then?

Willie Jackson: That we should work together and we should do a deal because the reality is the Greens are just talking about the party vote, aren’t they? Our Maori MPs went off the list and they’re looking at just winning their seats, so—

Lisa Owen: Are they open to this?

Willie Jackson: Well, I’ve talked to two or three candidates. I can’t name those candidates—

Lisa Owen: Auckland — Tamaki Makaurau — is one of the ones where you could potentially be in strife with splitting the vote there.

Willie Jackson: Well, she’s got popular, hasn’t she, Marama Davidson? So…

Lisa Owen: High profile. So is that one of the—?

Willie Jackson: Well, I can’t divulge the type of conversations we’re having, but, obviously, the Greens should work with us.

Lisa Owen: They haven’t ruled it out, though, Mr Jackson?

Willie Jackson: They certainly haven’t. Talking with different candidates, no, they haven’t worked it out because they are very clear, they just want the list vote.

Lisa Owen: So, in some seats, would your ideal scenario be, before the election, that you will do what Bill English did this week and say, ‘In this electorate, can you please vote for this candidate?’ You want an endorsement from the Greens in some of the Maori seats?

Willie Jackson: Absolutely. I have talked to one or two of them and we’re working this through because, surely, you don’t want to put the Maori Party candidate back in who will be jumping up and down trying to deal—

But Greens have ruled it out:


Jackson concedes that Labour have a battle on in several Maori electorates.

Davis is asked how the Maori seat contests will go when the Labour Party is struggling so much. He doesn’t challenge the ‘Labour struggling’ at all but talks to the positives for the Maori campaign.

Labour are trying to tie their Maori campaign to their wider campaign on housing.

Jackson is asked about talking to Greens in Maori electorates and is told of Turei’s tweet saying there is no dealing – he dismisses that as “she can tweet all she likes”.

They both say that Turei has no show of winning Te Tai Tonga.

Again “Labour is struggling…” – no challenge from either Jackson or Davis.